tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2017-06-22T23:30:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/does-anything-really-matter-essays-on-parfit-on-objectivity/ 2017-06-22T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-22T23:30:00-0400 Does Anything Really Matter?: Essays on Parfit on Objectivity Peter Singer (ed.) <p>2017.06.25 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/does-anything-really-matter-essays-on-parfit-on-objectivity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Peter Singer (ed.), <em>Does Anything Really Matter?: Essays on Parfit on Objectivity</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 300pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199653836.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Andrew Sepielli, University of Toronto</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a volume of essays on meta-ethical themes from Derek Parfit's magisterial book <em>On What Matters</em>. It boasts an impressive list of contributors, most of whom, we learn from Peter Singer's introduction, were chosen because Parfit saw fit to criticize their views at length. Predictably, then, most of them are established "big names", and many of their essays are defensive in character. As a result, the volume is a bit too intellectually conservative to meet the editor's stated goal of "reinvigorat[ing] discussions of objectivism in ethics". Nonetheless, it helps to clarify these discussions, and to bring out the deeper concerns that animated Parfit's bold and at times controversial stances in meta-ethics.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Several of the... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/does-anything-really-matter-essays-on-parfit-on-objectivity/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/god-and-the-meanings-of-life-what-god-could-and-couldnt-do-to-make-our-lives-more-meaningful/ 2017-06-22T22:30:00-0400 2017-06-22T22:30:00-0400 God and the Meanings of Life: What God Could and Couldn't Do to Make Our Lives More Meaningful, T. J. Mawson <p>2017.06.24 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/god-and-the-meanings-of-life-what-god-could-and-couldnt-do-to-make-our-lives-more-meaningful/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">T. J. Mawson, <em>God and the Meanings of Life: What God Could and Couldn't Do to Make Our Lives More Meaningful</em>, Bloomsbury, 2016, 240pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781474212540.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Craig G. Bartholomew, Redeemer University College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The last twenty-five years or so have witnessed a remarkable renaissance of interest among a minority of analytical philosophers in the question of the meaning of life, and this monograph provides a substantial contribution to that discussion. T. J. Mawson explains and affirms the legitimacy of the renaissance of interest in this question (Chapter 1), rightly insisting that the question cannot and should not be reduced to emotion and subjectivity, and helpfully positions his views throughout within the current debate. As the plural "Meanings" in the title indicates, a significant concern of Mawson's is to tease out and assess the variety of questions involved in the question of the meaning of life (Chapters 2-4).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Mawson... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/god-and-the-meanings-of-life-what-god-could-and-couldnt-do-to-make-our-lives-more-meaningful/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/modal-justification-via-theories-3/ 2017-06-21T21:45:00-0400 2017-06-21T21:45:00-0400 Modal Justification via Theories Bob Fischer <p>2017.06.23 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/modal-justification-via-theories-3/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Bob Fischer, <em>Modal Justification via Theories</em>, Springer, 2017, 135pp., $89.99 (hbk), ISBN 9783319491264.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Stephen Biggs, Iowa State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This book<em> </em>develops Bob Fischer's theory-based epistemology of modality<em> </em>(TEM), a significant contribution to the literature on modal epistemology. In addition to those working on modal epistemology, the book should interest many philosophers working in philosophy of science and metaphysics (since Fischer discusses the epistemology of both the physical and metaphysical modalities), as well as epistemologists working on inference to the best explanation or theoretical virtues (since Fischer discusses these in some detail, and quite insightfully, while explaining how we should choose among competing modal epistemologies). The book also could serve as a resource for those beginning to explore modal epistemology (since Fischer engages effectively, albeit often briefly, with many other contemporary modal epistemologies).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/modal-justification-via-theories-3/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/aesthetic-pursuits-essays-in-philosophy-of-art/ 2017-06-20T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-20T23:39:45-0400 Aesthetic Pursuits: Essays in Philosophy of Art Jerrold Levinson <p>2017.06.22 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aesthetic-pursuits-essays-in-philosophy-of-art/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Jerrold Levinson, <em>Aesthetic Pursuits: Essays in Philosophy of Art</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 197pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198767213.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Derek Matravers, The Open University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Although he has published a monograph (<em>Music in the Moment</em> (Cornell University Press, 1998)) the journal article is Jerrold Levinson's favoured vehicle for disseminating his research. The present volume is the fifth collection of such articles. This does enable him to spread his interests far and wide, and this volume has papers on a wide variety of topics. Six are broadly on the nature of aesthetics: 'Farewell to the Aesthetician?', 'Aesthetic Contextualism', 'Towards an Adequate Conception of Aesthetic Experience', 'Artistic Achievement and Artistic Value', 'Artistic Worth and Personal Taste', and 'Beauty is Not One: The Irreducible Variety of Visual Beauty'. Two are essay-length reviews of others' books: 'Emotional Upheavals' (on Martha Nussbaum's <em>Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of the Emotions</em>... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aesthetic-pursuits-essays-in-philosophy-of-art/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/machiavelli-on-liberty-and-conflict/ 2017-06-20T18:10:00-0400 2017-06-20T18:10:00-0400 Machiavelli on Liberty and Conflict David Johnston, Nadia Urbinati, and Camila Vergara (eds.) <p>2017.06.21 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/machiavelli-on-liberty-and-conflict/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">David Johnston, Nadia Urbinati, and Camila Vergara (eds.),<em> Machiavelli on Liberty and Conflict</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 423pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226429304.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Kenneth Winston, Harvard University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This volume originated at a conference in 2013 at Columbia University to celebrate the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of <em>The Prince</em>. It was an opportune occasion, as the editors note, to examine the foundations, meaning, and legacy of Machiavelli's thought. The result is an engaging, insightful collection of sixteen essays by scholars from Australia, England, France, Italy, and the United States presenting contemporary lines of research and interpretation. In subject matter, they range widely: from small-scale readings of selected texts, to historical and contextual studies of leading ideas, to assessments of Machiavelli's continuing influence.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The editors have divided the essays into four sections: on Machiavelli's relation to previous, especially ancient, political thinkers; Machiavelli's political realism and moral... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/machiavelli-on-liberty-and-conflict/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/phenomenology-of-sociality-discovering-the-we/ 2017-06-19T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-19T20:00:00-0400 Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the 'We' Thomas Szanto and Dermot Moran (eds.) <p>2017.06.20 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/phenomenology-of-sociality-discovering-the-we/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-weight:normal">Thomas Szanto and Dermot Moran (eds.), <em>Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the 'We'</em>, Routledge, 2016, 337pp., $148.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138918795.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Hans Bernhard Schmid, University of Vienna</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Phenomenology was big at the beginning of the 20th century, but it started to lose its leading role to other strands and movements of philosophical research in the second half -- resulting not just in a change of methods and styles, but also in a change of topics. Over the past few decades, however, one after another of the classical phenomenological research topics have reappeared on the philosophical agenda -- starting with intentionality and consciousness, current "phenomenological" issues extend to such topics as social cognition and emotion, collective intentionality, joint action, group agency, and social ontology. These issues, however, are often explored without reference to -- or perhaps sometimes even knowledge of -- the rich phenomenological tradition. As a particularly... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/phenomenology-of-sociality-discovering-the-we/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/does-history-make-sense-hegel-on-the-historical-shapes-of-justice/ 2017-06-18T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-18T23:30:00-0400 Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice Terry Pinkard <p>2017.06.19 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/does-history-make-sense-hegel-on-the-historical-shapes-of-justice/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Terry Pinkard, <em>Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice</em>, Harvard University Press, 2017, 272pp., <span style="background:white">$49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674971776.</span></span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Christopher Yeomans, Purdue University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Terry Pinkard's long-awaited contribution to the debate over the interpretation and contemporary significance of Hegel's theory of history does not disappoint. In many respects, this seems the book Pinkard was destined to write for us, combining as it does the masterful storytelling of both his Hegel biography and his book on Hegel's<em> Phenomenology </em>with his post-Kantian reading of Hegel's core thoughts on self-consciousness (e.g., in <em>Hegel's Naturalism</em>).<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> When one considers Pinkard's recent work alongside Paul Redding's on Hegel's philosophy of religion<a href="#_edn2" name="_ednref2" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[2]</span></span></a> and Robert Pippin's recent work on modern art,<a href="#_edn3" name="_ednref3" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[3]</span></span></a> one feels that the dominant program in Hegel studies over... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/does-history-make-sense-hegel-on-the-historical-shapes-of-justice/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-ethics-and-politics-of-immigration-core-issues-and-emerging-trends/ 2017-06-18T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-18T18:00:00-0400 The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends Alex Sager (ed.) <p>2017.06.18 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-ethics-and-politics-of-immigration-core-issues-and-emerging-trends/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Alex Sager (ed.), <em>The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends</em>, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016, 276pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN </span><span style="font-weight:normal">9781783486137.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Stefan Schlegel, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">It is not an easy task to give focus to a book with the title "<em>The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends</em>". Alex Sager does a great job of framing such a vast issue in the first and the last chapter. The setting in which he stages the book is one in which migration is still seen as something pathological, and nations not only as natural and given but also as largely benevolent institutions. As he notes in his introduction, "the history of humanity is a history of mobility, but political philosophy has often operated under the assumption of stasis in which migration is ignored or treated as pathological and exceptional". In the final chapter, he... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-ethics-and-politics-of-immigration-core-issues-and-emerging-trends/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/from-stoicism-to-platonism-the-development-of-philosophy-100-bce-100-ce/ 2017-06-15T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-15T20:00:00-0400 From Stoicism to Platonism: The Development of Philosophy, 100 BCE-100 CE Troels Engberg-Pedersen (ed.) <p>2017.06.17 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/from-stoicism-to-platonism-the-development-of-philosophy-100-bce-100-ce/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Troels Engberg-Pedersen (ed.), <em>From Stoicism to Platonism: The Development of Philosophy, 100 BCE-100 CE</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 399pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107166196.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Lloyd P. Gerson, University of Toronto</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The present volume is the fruit of a conference in Copenhagen in 2014. The occasion was the vision of the editor, Troels Engberg-Pedersen, to provide something like a synoptic account of philosophy in the so-called post-Hellenistic period of about 100 BCE to 100 CE, roughly from Panaetius (185-109 BCE) to Plutarch of Chaeronea (c. 45-125 CE). The hypothesis that Engberg-Pedersen offered to the conference participants was twofold: first, the title of this book with a question mark and second, that there is an asymmetrical relationship between the two major philosophical schools in this period, Stoicism and Platonism. A bit of context will perhaps help here. The period under investigation stands between the so-called Hellenistic period of ancient philosophy, roughly between... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/from-stoicism-to-platonism-the-development-of-philosophy-100-bce-100-ce/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/phenomenology-of-thinking-philosophical-investigations-into-the-character-of-cognitive-experiences/ 2017-06-14T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-14T23:30:00-0400 Phenomenology of Thinking: Philosophical Investigations into the Character of Cognitive Experiences Thiemo Breyer and Christopher Gutland (eds.) <p>2017.06.16 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/phenomenology-of-thinking-philosophical-investigations-into-the-character-of-cognitive-experiences/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="ndpr2bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12.0pt"><strong><span style="font-weight:normal">Thiemo Breyer and Christopher Gutland (eds.), </span></strong><em>Phenomenology of Thinking: Philosophical Investigations into the Character of Cognitive Experiences</em><strong><span style="font-weight:normal">, Routledge, 2016, 224pp., $148.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138901704.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by John J. Drummond, Fordham University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The debate concerning cognitive phenomenology in analytic philosophy of mind has centered around, first, the question of whether we consciously experience cognitive states. If one answers affirmatively, a second question arises: do cognitive states have phenomenal character in their own right, independent of the phenomenality proper to any associated or incorporated states? If so, a third question concerns the nature of cognition's phenomenal character.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The editors state that the purpose of the book is "to broaden the scope of this debate by fostering dialogue between the philosophy of mind and the phenomenological tradition inaugurated by Edmund Husserl" (1). For thinkers in the phenomenological tradition, however, the phrase "phenomenology of thinking" evokes not merely the cognitive... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/phenomenology-of-thinking-philosophical-investigations-into-the-character-of-cognitive-experiences/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/moses-mendelssohns-living-script-philosophy-practice-history-judaism/ 2017-06-14T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-14T18:00:00-0400 Moses Mendelssohn's Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism Elias Sacks <p>2017.06.15 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moses-mendelssohns-living-script-philosophy-practice-history-judaism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Elias Sacks, <em>Moses Mendelssohn's Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism</em>, Indiana University Press, 2017, 316pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253023742.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Corey W. Dyck, Western University/Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In 1783, Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) published his <em>Jerusalem: or on Religious Power and Judaism</em>, an extended argument for the limits of the state and religion with respect to individual conscience, as well as an impassioned defense of the reasonability and modernity of Jewish religious practice. In connection with his discussion of the latter in the second part of <em>Jerusalem</em>, Mendelssohn writes:</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The ceremonial law itself is a kind of living script, rousing the mind and heart, full of meaning, never ceasing to inspire contemplation and to provide the occasion and opportunity for oral instruction. What a student did and saw being done from morning till night pointed to religious doctrines and convictions.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moses-mendelssohns-living-script-philosophy-practice-history-judaism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-moral-and-political-philosophy-of-immigration-liberty-security-and-equality/ 2017-06-13T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-13T20:00:00-0400 The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality José Jorge Mendoza <p>2017.06.14 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-moral-and-political-philosophy-of-immigration-liberty-security-and-equality/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">José Jorge Mendoza, <em>The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality</em>, Lexington Books, 2017, 141pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498508513.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Douglas MacKay, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Four months into the presidency of Donald Trump, it is a common refrain that the Trump administration is "not ready to govern." Many take some comfort in this; the Trump administration's incompetence has arguably made the realization of Candidate Trump's campaign promises less likely -- e.g. repealing the Affordable Care Act. However, the Trump administration has made significant progress towards fulfilling Candidate Trump's promises regarding immigration enforcement. Trump has signed two executive orders that, among other things, direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to use state and local police officers to enforce immigration law, and widen the scope of undocumented immigrants prioritized for removal. These executive orders appear to have been effective. As Caitlin Dickerson reported in <em>The New York... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-moral-and-political-philosophy-of-immigration-liberty-security-and-equality/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/wisdom-won-from-illness-essays-in-philosophy-and-psychoanalysis/ 2017-06-12T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-12T23:30:00-0400 Wisdom Won from Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis Jonathan Lear <p>2017.06.13 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/wisdom-won-from-illness-essays-in-philosophy-and-psychoanalysis/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Jonathan Lear, <em>Wisdom Won from Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis</em>, Harvard University Press, 2017, 328pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674967847.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brian O'Connor, University College Dublin</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Jonathan Lear writes about a diverse range of topics with a steady mix of persuasion and provocation. The book, made up of previously published papers, includes chapters on issues in psychoanalysis, the interpretation of Plato, contemporary literature (J. M. Coetzee, Marilynne Robinson), and one on <em>As You Like It</em>. Among the psychoanalytic parts is a consideration of the significance of Aristotelian moral psychology in framing the objectives of the therapeutic process. (Lear defends himself from the charge of anachronism with brio.) There is also an ingenious reading of Freud's maddening Rat Man case. Lear occasionally illustrates his theoretical claims through notes from his own clinical practice. To the psychoanalytic outsider those short vignettes offer a tantalizing glimpse of the analytic... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/wisdom-won-from-illness-essays-in-philosophy-and-psychoanalysis/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/procreation-parenthood-and-educational-rights-ethical-and-philosophical-issues/ 2017-06-12T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-12T18:00:00-0400 Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights: Ethical and Philosophical Issues Jaime Ahlberg and Michael Cholbi (eds.) <p>2017.06.12 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/procreation-parenthood-and-educational-rights-ethical-and-philosophical-issues/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="ndpr2bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12.0pt"><strong><span style="font-weight:normal">Jaime Ahlberg and Michael Cholbi (eds.), Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights: Ethical and Philosophical Issues</span></strong><strong><span style="font-weight:normal">, Routledge, 2017, 277pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138206229.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Archard, Queen's University Belfast</strong></p> <p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Do we have rights to create and to rear children? If so, what are their source, nature and scope? In recent years there has been a huge volume of new writing in this area, and the present book contributes a further set of pieces that seek to answer the basic questions stated. The volume considers procreative ethics, what it means to be a parent, and how to balance parental and children's interests in a defensible specification of how children should be brought up and educated. It is a mixed bag with some pieces that argue for distinctive and substantive positions, others that muse on the difficulties in reaching agreement to answers, and others that are on the whole only suggestive... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/procreation-parenthood-and-educational-rights-ethical-and-philosophical-issues/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/lockes-science-of-knowledge/ 2017-06-11T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-11T20:00:00-0400 Locke's Science of Knowledge Matthew Priselac <p>2017.06.11 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/lockes-science-of-knowledge/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="ndpr2bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12.0pt"><strong><span style="font-weight:normal">Matthew Priselac, </span></strong><em>Locke's Science of Knowledge, </em><strong><span style="font-weight:normal">Routledge, 2017, 240pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138918832.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Georges Dicker, The College at Brockport, State University of New York</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This study of Locke's epistemology in <em>An Essay Concerning Human Understanding</em> is an original, ambitious, and complex monograph that also shows command of the relevant recent Locke scholarship. Although Matthew Priselac expounds Locke's epistemology as a whole, especially as presented in Books II and IV of the <em>Essay</em>, he says that his chief concern is Locke's "account of knowledge of the external world" (15; compare 9-11, 52, 60), and indeed his multi-layered book's most striking aspect, though by no means its only theme, is a defense of Locke's position on knowledge of the external world, or what Locke calls "sensitive knowledge." Such a defense faces at least two questions: (1) how can Locke avoid skepticism, given his doctrine that all... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/lockes-science-of-knowledge/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/continuants-their-activity-their-being-and-their-identity/ 2017-06-08T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-08T18:00:00-0400 Continuants: Their Activity, Their Being, and Their Identity David Wiggins <p>2017.06.10 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/continuants-their-activity-their-being-and-their-identity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">David Wiggins, <em>Continuants: Their Activity, Their Being, and Their Identity</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 239pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198716624.</p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Harold Noonan, University of Nottingham</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book of twelve essays is a selection of David Wiggins's writings from the last four and a half decades on the topics of substance and identity. The earliest is from 1968 and the last from 2016. They are deliberately not substantially rewritten so that readers can appreciate Wiggins's progress. However, as Wiggins puts it, he has pursued a policy of local repair and improvement, to do justice to the Aristotelian insight from which he once began. The book also contains a very useful bibliography of Wiggins's writings between 1964 and 2016.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The revision and additions take different forms for the different essays: straightforward revision, additional critical commentary, new material, abbreviation and reorganization. But in... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/continuants-their-activity-their-being-and-their-identity/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-ethics-of-human-enhancement-understanding-the-debate/ 2017-06-07T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-07T23:30:00-0400 The Ethics of Human Enhancement: Understanding the Debate Steve Clarke, Julian Savulescu, C. A. J. Coady, Alberto Giubilini, and Sagar Sanyal (eds.) <p>2017.06.09 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-ethics-of-human-enhancement-understanding-the-debate/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Steve Clarke, Julian Savulescu, C. A. J. Coady, Alberto Giubilini, and Sagar Sanyal (eds.), <em>The Ethics of Human Enhancement: Understanding the Debate</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 269pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198754855.</p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Stephen M. Campbell, Bentley University, and Sven Nyholm, Eindhoven University of Technology</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Humanity is rapidly developing technologies that hold the promise or peril (depending on your perspective) of reshaping what it means to be a human being. Should we embrace human enhancement technologies, or should we resist them? This is the primary question underlying the human enhancement debate. So-called "bioliberals" and "transhumanists" tend to optimistically welcome the arrival of human enhancement. "Bioconservatives" have in-principle objections to it. Others -- who are less easily labeled -- take a more moderate position, which often involves having different reactions to different types of enhancement.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This collection offers an overview and assessment of various facets of the human enhancement debate. According to the editors, this debate has reached an impasse, and... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-ethics-of-human-enhancement-understanding-the-debate/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/n-defense-of-moral-luck-why-luck-often-affects-praiseworthiness-and-blameworthiness/ 2017-06-07T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-07T18:00:00-0400 In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness Robert J. Hartman <p>2017.06.08 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/n-defense-of-moral-luck-why-luck-often-affects-praiseworthiness-and-blameworthiness/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Robert J. Hartman, <em><span style="border:none windowtext 1.0pt; padding:0in">In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness</span></em>, Routledge, 2017, 152pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138293441.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"> </p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Steven D. Hales, Bloomsburg University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The central thesis of this book is a traditional one: that there are kinds of resultant, circumstantial, and constitutive luck that help determine a person's praiseworthiness and blameworthiness (p. 90). In other words, moral luck is a real thing and matters for moral assessment. Of course, this idea has been picked at from various quarters ever since 1971, and there is a lot of material to review and rebut. Robert J. Hartman's book is packed with argument, and he seems to have read -- and determined to respond to -- the entirety of the moral luck literature. The plus side is that anyone with some interest in moral luck will find a discussion of their corner of the debate. There... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/n-defense-of-moral-luck-why-luck-often-affects-praiseworthiness-and-blameworthiness/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/pacificism-a-philosophy-of-nonviolence/ 2017-06-06T23:30:00-0400 2017-06-06T23:30:00-0400 Pacificism: A Philosophy of Nonviolence Robert L. Holmes <p>2017.06.07 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/pacificism-a-philosophy-of-nonviolence/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Robert L. Holmes, <em>Pacificism: A Philosophy of Nonviolence</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 346pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781474279833.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Cheyney Ryan, University of Oxford</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Recently, America's top commander in Afghanistan stated that without more troops, the conflict "threatens to become a stalemate". He was speaking of a conflict 15 years old and counting. A former Pentagon official (Rosa Brooks) titles her much discussed book <em>How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything: Tales from the Pentagon</em>, evoking Charles Beard's description of today as "permanent war for permanent peace". War vanished for a while from political philosophy at the end of the Cold War. The few papers on the topic at APA meetings were shunted off to sessions on "military ethics", a reflection of the emerging mindset that militaries had little relation to ordinary citizens and their political concerns. But the events of 9/11... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/pacificism-a-philosophy-of-nonviolence/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-fourfold-reading-the-late-heidegger/ 2017-06-06T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-06T18:00:00-0400 The Fourfold: Reading the Late Heidegger Andrew J. Mitchell <p>2017.06.06 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-fourfold-reading-the-late-heidegger/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Andrew J. Mitchell, <em>The Fourfold: Reading the Late Heidegger</em>, Northwestern University Press, 2015, 372pp., $34.95 (pbk), IBSN 9780810130760.</p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Gary E. Aylesworth, Eastern Illinois University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In this volume, Andrew J. Mitchell examines the fourfold (<em>das Geviert</em>) as the key to Heidegger’s later thinking. This motif is introduced for the first time in the <em>Bremen Lectures</em> of 1949 (which Mitchell translated into English), in reference to the thing as a gathering of earth, sky, mortals and divinities. Mitchell extends this conception of the thing as a gathering of relations to show that the later Heidegger steps beyond his treatment of things in <em>Being and Time</em>, and that he conceives things, not just <em>Dasein</em>, as ecstatically open and exposed to one another in the mirror-play of the world.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">For Mitchell’s reading, it is crucial to understand the technological essence (<em>das Gestell</em>) as... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-fourfold-reading-the-late-heidegger/" >Read More</a> </p>