tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2017-10-19T20:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/unequivocal-justice/ 2017-10-19T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-19T20:00:00-0400 Unequivocal Justice Christopher Freiman <p>2017.10.20 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/unequivocal-justice/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Christopher Freiman, <em>Unequivocal Justice</em>, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN </strong><strong>9781138628229.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Andrew I. Cohen, Georgia State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">John Rawls famously defends two principles of justice as those to which free and equal persons would agree. These principles apply to the basic structure of society. The basic structure includes the norms and institutions determining fundamental "rights, liberties, and opportunities" that any person needs, regardless of her particular aims.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> In his engaging and provocative book, Christopher Freiman argues that Rawlsians often wrongly dismiss free market systems as vehicles for realizing justice. Rawlsians are guilty of a "self-obviating idealization" (11): they assume an injustice makes robust redistributive states necessary, but ignore how that injustice perverts state institutions. Though Freiman might not convince many Rawlsians, he poses an important methodological challenge for liberal political... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/unequivocal-justice/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-age-of-responsibility/ 2017-10-18T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-18T20:00:00-0400 The Age of Responsibility Yascha Mounk <p>2017.10.19 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-age-of-responsibility/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Yascha Mounk, <em>The Age of Responsibility</em>, Harvard University Press, 2017, 280 pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674545465.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Scott Anderson, University of British Columbia</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is an impressive, frequently charming, and partly successful attempt to illuminate the way a distinctive understanding of “personal responsibility” — one which might be described as “responsibility as accountability” — has taken on an increasingly large and problematic role in Western politics and political thought over the last 50 years or so. It seems aimed to appeal well beyond the philosophical community, with hopes of motivating a thoughtful and concerned readership to revamp the way our conception of “personal responsibility”<sup>[</sup><sup><a href="#n1" id="1" name="1">1</a></sup> functions in political and social life. The book employs a fair amount of extant philosophical work to provoke a change in our public discourse and practices, while also performing some creative philosophical work that might be... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-age-of-responsibility/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/mathematics-and-its-applications-a-transcendental-idealist-perspective/ 2017-10-17T22:00:00-0400 2017-10-17T22:00:00-0400 Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective Jairo José da Silva <p>2017.10.18 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/mathematics-and-its-applications-a-transcendental-idealist-perspective/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jairo José da Silva, <em>Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective</em>, Springer, 2017, 275pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9783319630724.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mirja Hartimo, University of Jyväskylä, Finland</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Jairo José da Silva formulates a transcendental-idealist approach to mathematics. Appropriating (he is explicit about <em>not</em> engaging in any kind of exegesis) some central notions of Husserl's phenomenology, da Silva holds that mathematics is "intentionally posited" in the mathematical community, in communal work that has been carried out for centuries. "Intentional acts," such as intuiting or empty intending, put something with characteristic features and properties in front of the subject (28). If such positing is consistent, the intended object comes into existence (29). This allows viewing the existence of formal objects "on their own terms," as intentionally posited by the mathematicians. This leads da Silva to embrace a structuralist, and also Platonist, view of formal objects, corresponding not to metaphysical... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/mathematics-and-its-applications-a-transcendental-idealist-perspective/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/responsible-belief-a-theory-in-ethics-and-epistemology/ 2017-10-17T18:00:00-0400 2017-10-17T18:00:00-0400 Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology Rik Peels <p>2017.10.17 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/responsible-belief-a-theory-in-ethics-and-epistemology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p><strong style="font-weight:bold">Rik Peels, <em>Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288 pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190608118.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Gunnar Björnsson, Stockholm University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Rik Peels provides a comprehensive, original account of intellectual duties, doxastic blameworthiness, and responsible belief. The discussions, relating to work in epistemology as well as moral responsibility, are clear and often provide useful entries into the literature. Though I disagree with some of the main conclusions, the arguments are carefully laid out and typically merit a good amount of thought, even where one remains unconvinced. After providing an overview of the contents, I will specifically suggest that Peels' theory fails to account for one important kind of doxastic obligation and doxastic blame.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">In Chapter 1, Peels defends his understanding of the phenomena that are central to his inquiry. In line with a broadly Strawsonian tradition,... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/responsible-belief-a-theory-in-ethics-and-epistemology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-social-turn-in-moral-psychology/ 2017-10-16T22:00:00-0400 2017-10-16T22:00:00-0400 The Social Turn in Moral Psychology Mark Fedyk <p>2017.10.16 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-social-turn-in-moral-psychology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Mark Fedyk, <em>The Social Turn in Moral Psychology</em>, MIT Press, 2017, 246 pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262035569.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Adam R. Thompson, University of Nebraska</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Mark Fedyk is on a mission to correct the way we incorporate empirical research, especially social scientific research, into moral psychology and ethics. For those interested in philosophical methodology, many chapters, if not the entire book, are essential reading. And, interestingly, Fedyk's arguments may extend beyond the bounds of ethics into other fields. That's the good news, on which I'll expand shortly. First, some bad news.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Though the work pays off, it is sometimes frustrating to discern what exactly Fedyk is up to in the beginning and at stops along the way. For instance, for such a concise book, he does not offer a succinct statement of his project or overall argument. One bit of... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-social-turn-in-moral-psychology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/beyond-vision-philosophical-essays/ 2017-10-16T18:00:00-0400 2017-10-16T18:00:00-0400 Beyond Vision: Philosophical Essays Casey O'Callaghan <p>2017.10.15 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/beyond-vision-philosophical-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Casey O'Callaghan, <em>Beyond Vision: Philosophical Essays</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 203pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 97801987882964.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mark Eli Kalderon, University College London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a collection of eight essays that extends the project of Casey O'Callaghan's earlier monograph, <em>Sounds: A Philosophical Theory.</em> If visuocentrism is the vice of overgeneralizing from vision to the nature of perception more generally, then its costs are perspective-induced distortion and omission. Approaching the nature of perception from the perspective of vision alone results in a distorted conception since the senses differ importantly from one another, and the nature of perception properly conceived should allow for such diversity. And it results in omission since in focusing exclusively on vision such an approach is blind to such diversity. O'Callaghan aims to uncover lessons from beyond vision, not just about the diversity of the senses, but also about the ways... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/beyond-vision-philosophical-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-cambridge-companion-to-ancient-ethics/ 2017-10-15T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-15T20:00:00-0400 The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Ethics Christopher Bobonich (ed.) <p>2017.10.14 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-cambridge-companion-to-ancient-ethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Christopher Bobonich (ed.), <em>The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Ethics</em>, Cambridge, 2017, 395 pp., $29.99 (pbk) ISBN 9781107652316.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brad Inwood, Yale University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The blurb on the back of the book says that "the field of ancient Greek ethics is increasingly emerging as a major branch of philosophical enquiry," but that claim is too cautious. Ancient ethics has been an important area of philosophical work for quite a long time already, so there is all the more reason to welcome the appearance of a well-planned and well-executed <em>Companion</em> in the familiar Cambridge mode. Christopher Bobonich has assembled a strong team of established and emerging authorities in the field; in eighteen chapters (of remarkably consistent size, about 15 pages each) the book covers a wider range of topics than one might have expected, though some readers (like this one) will look for more. Something... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-cambridge-companion-to-ancient-ethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/art-mind-and-narrative-themes-from-the-work-of-peter-goldie/ 2017-10-12T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-12T20:00:00-0400 Art, Mind, and Narrative: Themes from the Work of Peter Goldie Julian Dodd (ed.) <p>2017.10.13 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/art-mind-and-narrative-themes-from-the-work-of-peter-goldie/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Julian Dodd (ed.), <em>Art, Mind, and Narrative: Themes from the Work of Peter Goldie</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 271pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198769736.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Cain Todd, Lancaster University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">It can be a challenge to provide a general sense of the contents of philosophical anthologies -- and hence to avoid a mere summary -- unless they are particularly constrained and unified by their theme. Even then, it is impossible to do anything like equal justice to all of the contributions. In the case of this volume, the collected papers are unified to the extent that they all focus on Peter Goldie's main philosophical concerns. Although these concerns were extremely wide ranging, they were more or less connected by the themes of narrative, art, and emotion, and by Goldie's distinctive recognition of the complexity and relative disorder of our mental lives. Few other philosophers have managed so convincingly, and elegantly,... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/art-mind-and-narrative-themes-from-the-work-of-peter-goldie/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/i-me-mine-back-to-kant-and-back-again/ 2017-10-11T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-11T20:00:00-0400 I, Me, Mine: Back to Kant, and Back Again Béatrice Longuenesse <p>2017.10.12 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/i-me-mine-back-to-kant-and-back-again/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p style="margin-bottom:8pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong>Béatrice Longuenesse, <em>I, Me, Mine: Back to Kant, and Back Again</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 257pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN </strong><strong><span style="background:white">9780199665761.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Patricia Kitcher, Columbia University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book makes important contributions to three interrelated projects: contemporary work in philosophy of mind that draws on the Strawsonian and Wittgensteinean traditions of Kant interpretation, the interpretation of Kant's complex theories of the 'I think,' and the relation of Kant's theories to 20<sup>th</sup> and 21<sup>st</sup> century psychological accounts of mental unity and development. Béatrice Longuenesse's goal is to show that Kant's analyses of the necessary role of 'I' representations and thoughts in cognition are philosophically correct by contrasting them with the best contemporary alternatives. She then uses later work in psychology to show that his theories cannot be dismissed as noumenal fairytales. This ambitious project involves notoriously difficult issues, such as 'self,' 'thought,' and 'consciousness,' but Longuenesse can draw... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/i-me-mine-back-to-kant-and-back-again/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/a-comparative-analysis-of-cicero-and-aquinas-nature-and-the-natural-law/ 2017-10-10T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-10T20:00:00-0400 A Comparative Analysis of Cicero and Aquinas: Nature and the Natural Law Charles P. Nemeth <p>2017.10.11 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-comparative-analysis-of-cicero-and-aquinas-nature-and-the-natural-law/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Charles P. Nemeth, <em>A Comparative Analysis of Cicero and Aquinas: Nature and the Natural Law, </em>Bloomsbury, 2017, 192pp., $88.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350009462.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Tony Burns, University of Nottingham</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book is, as the title suggests, a comparative study of the thought of Cicero and Saint Thomas Aquinas, focusing on the issue of their respective attitudes towards the notion of natural law. Charles Nemeth's thesis is that 'the natural law philosophies of Cicero and Aquinas, at least in a broad, very general sense, are remarkably similar' (p. 135). Indeed, when they 'are placed side by side, the similarities outweigh the differences' (p. 134). There is evidently some justification for holding this view. It seems to me, however, that Nemeth's over-states his case and that he has a tendency to downplay the significance of a number of differences between the natural law theory of Aquinas and that of Cicero.</p> <p... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-comparative-analysis-of-cicero-and-aquinas-nature-and-the-natural-law/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/moral-judgments-as-educated-intuitions/ 2017-10-09T22:00:00-0400 2017-10-09T22:00:00-0400 Moral Judgments as Educated Intuitions Hanno Sauer <p>2017.10.10 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moral-judgments-as-educated-intuitions/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Hanno Sauer, <em>Moral Judgments as Educated Intuitions</em>, MIT Press, 2017, 312 pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN <span lang="EN-AU" style="letter-spacing:.4pt">9780262035606.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Joshua Alexander, Siena College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Hanno Sauer provides a thoughtful defense for a novel kind of rationalism about moral psychology. More traditional rationalist models suggest that moral judgments arise from deliberative reflection and the careful weighing of reasons. These models have fallen out of fashion in recent years, and it has become increasingly popular to think that moral judgments are instead shaped by our "moral intuitions" -- fast and often emotionally-charged responses to morally salient situations that are produced by unconscious cognitive processes and mechanisms. This change in how we commonly think about moral psychology has been driven by a growing body of empirical research that suggests, among other things, that people form moral judgments so quickly that it would be impossible for those judgments... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moral-judgments-as-educated-intuitions/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/hobbesian-applied-ethics-and-public-policy/ 2017-10-09T18:00:00-0400 2017-10-09T18:00:00-0400 Hobbesian Applied Ethics and Public Policy Shane D. Courtland (ed.) <p>2017.10.09 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hobbesian-applied-ethics-and-public-policy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Shane D. Courtland (ed.), <em>Hobbesian Applied Ethics and Public Policy</em>, Routledge, 2018, 293 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138691636.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robin Douglass, King's College London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In the introduction to this wide-ranging collection, Shane D. Courtland observes that while philosophers such as Immanuel Kant, Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill are routinely invoked in applied ethics and public policy debates, 'the Hobbesian project has been largely missing' (p. 1). The volume comprises fifteen chapters addressing a variety of problems in applied ethics, with the goal of redressing this neglect and offering 'not only a fresh take regarding those problems, but also a fresh take regarding Hobbes' (p. 2). In this review, I briefly outline the arguments of each chapter before evaluating the extent to which the volume contributes to our understanding of both Hobbes and debates in applied ethics.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The first... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hobbesian-applied-ethics-and-public-policy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/panpsychism-contemporary-perspectives/ 2017-10-08T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-08T20:00:00-0400 Panpsychism: Contemporary Perspectives Godehard Bruntrup and Ludwig Jaskolla (eds.) <p>2017.10.08 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/panpsychism-contemporary-perspectives/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Godehard Bruntrup and Ludwig Jaskolla (eds.), <em>Panpsychism: Contemporary Perspectives</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 414pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199359943.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Joseph Levine, University of Massachusetts Amherst</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">When I was interviewing for my first tenure-track job, at Boston University, in the winter of 1981, I gave a paper on the problem qualia posed for materialism. In the paper I argued that functionalism, the then (and still) reigning theory on the mind-body relation, couldn't adequately account for qualia. In the question period, Abner Shimony, the renowned philosopher of physics, asked me the following question: what if we attribute consciousness to elementary particles? Wouldn't that help solve the problem? My initial response was the proverbial "incredulous stare." But this was a job interview, so more was required; after all, you don't want to offend a senior member of the department interviewing you. I don't remember exactly what I said... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/panpsychism-contemporary-perspectives/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-social-and-political-philosophy-of-mary-wollstonecraft-2/ 2017-10-05T22:00:00-0400 2017-10-05T22:00:00-0400 The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft Sandrine Bergès and Alan Coffee (eds.) <p>2017.10.07 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-social-and-political-philosophy-of-mary-wollstonecraft-2/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Sandrine Bergès and Alan Coffee (eds.), <em>The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft</em>, Oxford University Press 2017, 247 pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198766841.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Ruth Hagengruber, Paderborn University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), a famous and prolific writer whose work was translated into several languages during her lifetime, reflected on the philosophical and political issues connected with the topics current at that time. Her ideas focus on important themes such as how a community organizes itself and what is wrong with the general positions of women in society. Today, her writing serves as an example of a proto-feminist approach which articulates this special problem of the sexes as an elementary moment in political philosophy. Nonetheless, although these issues have continued to be relevant, Wollstonecraft's position is debated within feminist theory. Her writings satisfy the claims of the feminist approach insofar as they contain a decisive critique of patriarchal dominion which... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-social-and-political-philosophy-of-mary-wollstonecraft-2/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/disorientation-and-moral-life/ 2017-10-05T18:00:00-0400 2017-10-05T18:00:00-0400 Disorientation and Moral Life Ami Harbin <p>2017.10.06 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/disorientation-and-moral-life/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Ami Harbin, <em>Disorientation and Moral Life</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 256pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190277406.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Elise Springer, Wesleyan University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">How is moral life is affected by major practical disorientations -- by profound experiences of feeling at a loss for how to go on with one's life? Many moral theorists will treat major disorientations the way Aristotle treats shame: in the context of a moral life, disorientation is a defect, since the affected person cannot serve as a consistent moral exemplar. Ami Harbin defends a contrary view: disorientation can be appreciated in morally positive ways. Disorientation is not defined precisely here; instead, the book highlights family resemblances among phenomena such as grief, migration, double-consciousness, queerness, profound illness and trauma. These are each treated with compassion, and often with psychological detail.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">A different author might locate... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/disorientation-and-moral-life/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-perfectionist-turn-from-metanorms-to-metaethics/ 2017-10-04T23:00:00-0400 2017-10-04T23:00:00-0400 The Perfectionist Turn: From Metanorms to Metaethics Douglas J. Den Uyl and Douglas B. Rasmussen <p>2017.10.05 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-perfectionist-turn-from-metanorms-to-metaethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Douglas J. Den Uyl and Douglas B. Rasmussen, <em>The Perfectionist Turn: From Metanorms to Metaethics</em>, Edinburgh University Press, 2016, 346 pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474413343.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Justin Tosi, Georgetown University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Philosophers who defend perfectionist accounts of the human good and then go on to develop political theories tend to favor political institutions that promote that view of the good. In other words, political philosophers tend to be perfectionists all the way down, or not at all. Douglas Den Uyl and Douglas Rasmussen are an exception to this rule. In an earlier work, they argued for a neo-Aristotelian perfectionist foundation for political liberalism.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> Here they develop in greater detail the ethical doctrine of "individualistic perfectionism" that serves as the basis of their political theory.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Den Uyl and Rasmussen cast ethical theorizing as proceeding from a choice between two "templates"... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-perfectionist-turn-from-metanorms-to-metaethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/a-naive-realist-theory-of-colour/ 2017-10-04T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-04T20:00:00-0400 A Naïve Realist Theory of Colour Keith Allen <p>2017.10.04 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-naive-realist-theory-of-colour/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" dir="LTR" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Keith Allen, <em>A Naïve Realist Theory of Colour</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 204 pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198755364.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Hagit Benbaji, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" dir="LTR" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The title of Keith Allen's fascinating book succinctly describes its content. The theory is realist because it holds that colors are <em>mind-independent</em> properties of physical objects. The theory is naïve because it holds that colors are <em>distinct</em> from any property identified by science. And it is a theory: notwithstanding any association with the adjective 'naïve,' this is the most systematic and developed account of colors as qualitative properties to date. Beyond the title, we are acquainted with qualitative properties through experience, so that the naïve realist theory of colors is coupled with a naïve realist theory of perception, in order to account for the autonomy of the manifest image. Yet, the manifest image does not "flow free" of the... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-naive-realist-theory-of-colour/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/metaphysics-and-the-philosophy-of-science-new-essays/ 2017-10-03T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-03T20:00:00-0400 Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Science: New Essays Matthew H. Slater and Zanja Yudell (eds.) <p>2017.10.03 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/metaphysics-and-the-philosophy-of-science-new-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Matthew H. Slater and Zanja Yudell (eds.), <em>Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Science: New Essays</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 258 pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199363209.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Matteo Morganti, University of Rome 'Tre'</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The ongoing trend of reflecting on the methodological basis of metaphysics constantly leads to new additions to the literature. Undoubtedly, the main recurring theme is the relationship, if any, between metaphysics and science; hence the prospects of a 'naturalistic' approach to metaphysical inquiry. This collection of essays edited by Matthew H. Slater and Zanja Yudell belongs to the growing series of contributions dealing with this latter topic.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">As we are told on the cover flap, the volume "explores the role that metaphysics should play in our philosophizing about science." This normative endeavour, however, does not lead to a unitary, overarching view of metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Indeed, instead of this, one finds a... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/metaphysics-and-the-philosophy-of-science-new-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/ernst-jungers-philosophy-of-technology-heidegger-and-the-poetics-of-the-anthropocene/ 2017-10-02T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-02T23:27:57-0400 Ernst Jünger's Philosophy of Technology: Heidegger and the Poetics of the Anthropocene Vincent Blok <p>2017.10.02 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/ernst-jungers-philosophy-of-technology-heidegger-and-the-poetics-of-the-anthropocene/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Vincent Blok, <em>Ernst Jünger's Philosophy of Technology: Heidegger and the Poetics of the Anthropocene</em>, Routledge, 2017, 153pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138737594.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robert P. Crease, Stony Brook University</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Ernst Jünger (1895-1998) was a writer, novelist, author, and philosopher whose significant influence on 20<sup>th</sup> century thought was twofold. The first is via his notion of "total mobilization," a description of the technological age as characterized by a wholesale transformation of human life into exploitable energies and resources. The second is via his impact on the thought of Martin Heidegger, one of the greatest of 20<sup>th</sup> century philosophers. This influence is manifested particularly in Heidegger's notion, in <em>The Question Concerning Technology</em>, of the <em>Gestell</em> or "Enframing," a mode of existence in which beings of all sorts, including human beings, appear as means towards ends. Blok's book is a narrow exposition of both of these aspects of Jünger's thought. The book... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/ernst-jungers-philosophy-of-technology-heidegger-and-the-poetics-of-the-anthropocene/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/critical-theory-in-critical-times-transforming-the-global-political-and-economic-order/ 2017-10-01T20:00:00-0400 2017-10-03T09:43:50-0400 Critical Theory in Critical Times: Transforming the Global Political and Economic Order Penelope Deutscher and Cristina Lafont (eds.) <p>2017.10.01 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/critical-theory-in-critical-times-transforming-the-global-political-and-economic-order/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Penelope Deutscher and Cristina Lafont (eds.), <em>Critical Theory in Critical Times: Transforming the Global Political and Economic Order</em>, Columbia University Press, 2017, 290pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231181518.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Peter Niesen, Universität Hamburg</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Can Critical Theory<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> today have a "critical" function in the several meanings of the term -- crisis-induced, non-affirmative, indispensable, and cutting edge? Whether there is a well-formed answer to that question depends on whether there is a sufficiently unified understanding of what Critical Theory is. Understood historically, Critical Theory is scholarly work in the early Frankfurt School tradition of combining philosophical analysis and speculation with state-of-the-art social, political and legal research. In their critique of capitalist economy and society, Theodor W. Adorno and Max Horkheimer, the key members of the founding generation, relied on Hegelian-Marxist background assumptions that no longer claim universal philosophical comprehensibility, as most authors in this volume seem to concur.... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/critical-theory-in-critical-times-transforming-the-global-political-and-economic-order/" >Read More</a> </p>