tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2017-11-20T23:30:00-0500 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-choice-theory-of-contracts/ 2017-11-20T23:30:00-0500 2017-11-20T23:30:00-0500 The Choice Theory of Contracts Hanoch Dagan and Michael Heller <p>2017.11.20 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-choice-theory-of-contracts/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Hanoch Dagan and Michael Heller, <em>The Choice Theory of Contracts</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 180pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 97801316501702.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Nicolas Cornell, University of Michigan</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This book aims to provide a new approach to thinking about the role of contract law in a liberal state. The fundamental idea is that the law should affirmatively facilitate citizens' autonomy by creating and sustaining various different types of contractual relationships so that citizens have the option to choose among them. The authors start from the idea that "bargaining for terms is not the dominant mode of contracting . . . the mainstay of present-day contracting is the choice among types" (2-3). We choose to relate as employees or independent contractors, married or just cohabiting, merchants selling goods or private individuals selling goods as-is. Given that the choice of contract type plays such an important determining role in structuring... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-choice-theory-of-contracts/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/spinozas-ethics-a-critical-guide/ 2017-11-20T21:30:00-0500 2017-11-20T22:20:36-0500 Spinoza's Ethics: A Critical Guide Yitzhak Melamed (ed.) <p>2017.11.19 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/spinozas-ethics-a-critical-guide/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), <em>Spinoza's </em>Ethics<em>: A Critical Guide</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 346pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107118119.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Matthew Kisner, University of South Carolina</strong></p> <p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The fifteen essays in this Critical Guide aim to contribute to the latest research on Spinoza's <em>Ethics</em>. Rather than focusing on a particular theme, the volume provides balanced coverage of the standard topics (metaphysics, knowledge, emotions, ethics), without falling prey to the common tendency to focus on the first two parts of the <em>Ethics</em>. Consequently, most Spinoza scholars will find something in the volume to be essential reading; the same is likely true for many historians of early modern philosophy generally. The editor has included many international scholars, with contributions from Warren Zev Harvey (Israel), Lia Levy (Brazil), Beth Lord (the United Kingdom), and Pina Totaro (Italy). Nevertheless, the essays are mostly the sort of thing that one expects from... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/spinozas-ethics-a-critical-guide/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/kants-critique-of-pure-reason-a-critical-guide/ 2017-11-19T20:40:00-0500 2017-11-19T20:40:00-0500 Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: A Critical Guide James R. O'Shea (ed.) <p>2017.11.18 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kants-critique-of-pure-reason-a-critical-guide/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">James R. O'Shea (ed.), <em>Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: A Critical Guide</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 297pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107074811.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by James Messina, University of Wisconsin-Madison</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book is the newest installment in the Cambridge Critical Guides series, which aims to "serv[e] the twin tasks of introduction and exploration" (1). Its fourteen chapters skew towards the latter task; they present cutting-edge research by scholars at various stages of their careers on some central themes and arguments of the first <em>Critique</em>. Different chapters can be fruitfully compared with regard to both content and general approach. On the latter point, for example, some authors are particularly concerned to view Kant's ideas against the background of his predecessors' positions, while others focus on the internal dynamics of his views, and yet others underscore the relationship between his ideas and contemporary philosophy. Another example: one author (Allais) defends "reading the... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kants-critique-of-pure-reason-a-critical-guide/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/knowledge-as-acceptable-testimony/ 2017-11-16T22:00:00-0500 2017-11-17T12:24:17-0500 Knowledge as Acceptable Testimony Steven L. Reynolds <p>2017.11.17 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-as-acceptable-testimony/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Steven L. Reynolds, <em>Knowledge as Acceptable Testimony</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 216pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107197756.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Martin Kusch, University of Vienna</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span lang="EN-GB" style="border:none windowtext 1.0pt; padding:0in">This book fuses "knowledge-first epistemology" (KFE) with "function-first epistemology" (FFE). KFE rejects the traditional project of defining knowledge. Knowledge is too fundamental to be reduced. But knowledge can be used to define, or characterize, other epistemic concepts. For instance, (mere) belief is "botched knowledge" (Williamson 2000: 446).</span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><span lang="EN-GB" style="border:none windowtext 1.0pt; padding:0in">FFE holds that key features of our epistemic concepts can best be explained in terms of their functions in our social life. Some FFEs are "genealogical"; they seek to identify these functions with the help of a quasi-historical thought experiment about a hypothetical "epistemic state of nature". The thought experiment is used to answer the question: Why would... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-as-acceptable-testimony/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/righting-epistemology-humes-revolution/ 2017-11-16T18:00:00-0500 2017-11-16T18:00:00-0500 Righting Epistemology: Hume's Revolution Bredo Johnsen <p>2017.11.16 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/righting-epistemology-humes-revolution/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Bredo Johnsen, <em>Righting Epistemology: Hume's Revolution</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 320pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN <span style="background:white">9780190662776.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jared Bates, Hanover College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Recent epistemology has lost its way, gone terribly wrong and needs to be righted. Much the same holds for scholarship on the history of epistemology. These two themes run through this volume. Johnsen's central argument is that Hume advanced a positive (anti-skeptical) response to the problem of radical skepticism about the external world that contained core elements of the theory of epistemic justification developed by Quine two centuries later. There is urgency to this project: "Quine's epistemology is the culmination of the Humean revolution, and the crowning achievement to date not only of the empiricist tradition, but of epistemology itself. Yet incredibly, it threatens to vanish, due to deep and widespread misunderstandings of it" (145).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in;... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/righting-epistemology-humes-revolution/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/perception-and-its-development-in-merleau-pontys-phenomenology/ 2017-11-15T22:00:00-0500 2017-11-15T22:00:00-0500 Perception and its Development in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology Kirsten Jacobson and John Russon (eds.) <p>2017.11.15 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/perception-and-its-development-in-merleau-pontys-phenomenology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Kirsten Jacobson and John Russon (eds.), <em>Perception and its Development in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology</em>, University of Toronto Press, 2017, 373pp., $75.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781487501280.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Dimitris Apostolopoulos, University of Notre Dame</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In the words of its editors, this volume<em> </em>aims to “illuminate, defend, and expand on the insights developed in Merleau-Ponty’s <em>Phenomenology of Perception</em>” (‘A Note on Citations’). It has four parts: ‘Passivity and Intersubjectivity’ (I); ‘Generality and Objectivity’ (II); ‘Meaning and Ambiguity’ (<span class="caps">III</span>); and ‘Expression’ (IV). To give a sense of the range of topics covered, and their philosophical and textual scope, I will review contributions from each of its parts, before making some broader observations.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The volume opens with a contribution from John Russon on the relations among attention, freedom, and passivity (themes that the ‘Introduction’ claimed were intimately connected, in the guise of “openness” and “creativity”). Having considered examples suggesting that attending... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/perception-and-its-development-in-merleau-pontys-phenomenology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/immunity-the-evolution-of-an-idea/ 2017-11-15T18:00:00-0500 2017-11-15T18:00:00-0500 Immunity: the Evolution of an Idea Alfred I. Tauber <p>2017.11.14 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/immunity-the-evolution-of-an-idea/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong>Alfred I. Tauber, <em>Immunity: the Evolution of an Idea</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 303pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN </strong><strong><span style="background:white">9780190651244.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Melinda Bonnie Fagan, University of Utah</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Tauber's new book characterizes immunology as a science concerned with the establishment and maintenance of identity and individuality. As with much of Tauber's previous work, the book is concerned with the transformation of fundamental ideas about immunity. Tauber advocates an alternative to the currently-prevalent conception of immunity as defense of an autonomous individual self. On this alternative, which he terms "the ecological view," the immune self is not a fixed entity but dynamic, emerging continuously from interactions between the organism as traditionally conceived and its internal and external environments. The book's central argument is that the ecological view is more comprehensive and better empirically-supported than its entrenched rival. Tauber characterizes the hoped-for transformation as a radical disciplinary reorientation, positioning immunology... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/immunity-the-evolution-of-an-idea/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/biological-individuality-integrating-scientific-philosophical-and-historical-perspectives/ 2017-11-14T22:00:00-0500 2017-11-14T22:00:00-0500 Biological Individuality: Integrating Scientific, Philosophical, and Historical Perspectives Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart (eds.) <p>2017.11.13 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/biological-individuality-integrating-scientific-philosophical-and-historical-perspectives/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart (eds.), <em>Biological Individuality: Integrating Scientific, Philosophical, and Historical Perspectives</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 400 pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780226446455.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Pierrick Bourrat, Macquarie University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">What is a biological individual? This is the main question this edited collection attempts to answer and intuitively it seems an easy one. Biological entities that are in some ways autonomous, clearly distinct from their environment, able to maintain their integrity and able to feed and reproduce will count as individuals. But when the question is deepened, it becomes clear that none of these criteria apply generally to all the objects that have been referred to by the term <em>biological individual</em>. Take, for instance, the quaking aspen. This species of tree, very common in Canada, create forests of clonal trees that all belong to a single root system (Bouchard 2008). One would intuitively consider every tree, delineated by a single... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/biological-individuality-integrating-scientific-philosophical-and-historical-perspectives/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/japanese-environmental-philosophy/ 2017-11-14T18:00:00-0500 2017-11-14T18:00:00-0500 Japanese Environmental Philosophy J. Baird Callicott and James McRae (eds.) <p>2017.11.12 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/japanese-environmental-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">J. Baird Callicott and James McRae (eds.), <em>Japanese Environmental Philosophy</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 310pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190456320.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Shigenori Nagatomo, Temple University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">J. Baird Callicott and James McRae have brought together fifteen scholars' views on the relation of Japanese thought to modern environmental concerns. The editors accurately portray these contents as drawing from a wide range of philosophical sources, such as Dōgen and Kūkai's Buddhist non-dualism, <span style="font-variant:small-caps">Kuki</span> Shūzo's <em>Structure of Iki</em> [living / breathing / stylishly cool], Alfred North Whitehead's process perspectivism, the business ethics of <em>kyōsei</em> [co-habitation], and even the structure of Japanese language itself. However, Carl C. Becker's forward, in which he describes generational changes in how modern Japan lives nature, pulls on the strongest thread running through most of these chapters: the natural environment embedded in human culture generally, and Japanese culture in particular. This is addressed both... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/japanese-environmental-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/plato-and-plotinus-on-mysticism-epistemology-and-ethics/ 2017-11-13T20:00:00-0500 2017-11-13T20:00:00-0500 Plato and Plotinus on Mysticism, Epistemology and Ethics David J. Yount <p>2017.11.11 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/plato-and-plotinus-on-mysticism-epistemology-and-ethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="background:white">David J. Yount<em>, Plato and Plotinus on Mysticism, Epistemology and Ethics</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 311 pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474298421.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Georges Leroux, Université du Québec à Montréal</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In his new study of the similarities between Plato and Plotinus, David J. Yount proceeds to a meticulously argued demonstration of the thesis he had already put forward in his preceding book (<em>Plotinus the Platonist: A Comparative Account of Plato and Plotinus’ Metaphysics</em>, Bloomsbury, 2016). According to him, there are no essential differences between their philosophical doctrines. This thesis has a long history, and it has been discussed in numerous, if not all, modern and contemporay studies devoted to the influence of Plato’s doctrines on Plotinus. As Yount reminds us in the opening pages, referring to E. N. Tigerstedt’s seminal work (<em>Interpreting Plato</em>, 1977), this debate goes back to the discussion of the unwritten doctrines of Plato, a discussion that led... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/plato-and-plotinus-on-mysticism-epistemology-and-ethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/postmetaphysical-thinking-ii/ 2017-11-12T20:00:00-0500 2017-11-13T04:36:24-0500 Postmetaphysical Thinking II Jürgen Habermas <p>2017.11.10 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/postmetaphysical-thinking-ii/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jürgen Habermas, <em>Postmetaphysical Thinking II</em>, Ciaran Cronin (tr.), Polity, 2017, 276 pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745682150.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Peter Dews, University of Essex</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">It is hard to think of a contemporary philosopher whose achievement rivals that of Jürgen Habermas, in terms of range, comprehensiveness and ambition. After more than sixty years of intellectual endeavour, Habermas has accumulated an <em>oeuvre </em>which not only stands in the tradition of the great systematic social thinkers of the nineteenth and early twentieth century — Hegel, Marx, Durkheim, Weber — but can claim a dignified place beside them. His writings have dealt with the philosophy of language and communication, the basis of moral consciousness, the philosophy of history and the evolution of social life since the dawn of human time, sociological theory on the grand scale, political philosophy and legal theory, and — increasingly — the philosophy of... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/postmetaphysical-thinking-ii/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/centering-and-extending-an-essay-on-metaphysical-sense/ 2017-11-09T22:00:00-0500 2017-11-09T22:00:00-0500 Centering and Extending: An Essay on Metaphysical Sense Stephen G. Smith <p>2017.11.09 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/centering-and-extending-an-essay-on-metaphysical-sense/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Stephen G. Smith, <em>Centering and Extending: An Essay on Metaphysical Sense</em>, SUNY Press, 2017, 222pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438464237.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Keith Robinson, University of Arkansas at Little Rock</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The 'end of metaphysics' scenarios that characterized a good deal of twentieth century philosophy have given way to a broad range of contemporary metaphysical options. From metametaphysics and formal approaches to naturalized metaphysics and various kinds of metaphysical realisms (mainstream, speculative, modal, process, etc.), idealisms and pragmatisms, metaphysics in analytic and non-analytic fields is flourishing. What is metaphysics, what value does it have, what are its objects or entities, what are its scope and limits and how should it proceed are, despite the Kantian settlement, all still live questions. In Stephen G. Smith's new book, these questions are approached, but Smith wants to 'do' metaphysics; that is, propose and construct a system of his own by leaning on the great... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/centering-and-extending-an-essay-on-metaphysical-sense/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-collected-writings-of-jaysankar-lal-shaw-indian-analytic-and-anglophone-philosophy/ 2017-11-09T18:00:00-0500 2017-11-09T18:00:00-0500 The Collected Writings of Jaysankar Lal Shaw: Indian Analytic and Anglophone Philosophy Jaysankar Lal Shaw <p>2017.11.08 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-collected-writings-of-jaysankar-lal-shaw-indian-analytic-and-anglophone-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jaysankar Lal Shaw, <em>The Collected Writings of Jaysankar Lal Shaw: Indian Analytic and Anglophone Philosophy</em>, Bloomsbury, 2016, 502 pp., $176.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474245050</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Purushottama Bilimoria, University of California/Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Jaysankar Lal Shaw is among the stalwarts of Indian and comparative philosophy, bringing to their treatment the tools of Anglo-American analytic philosophy. From all reports, Shaw has been a significant figure in this field in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. After completing his doctoral studies at Rice University, he joined the Department of Philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, where he worked closely with the two modal logicians, George Hughes and Max Creswell. He had also studied with traditional <em>paṇḍits</em> in West Bengal<em>,</em> notably Visvabandhu Tarkatīrtha, while also coming under the influence of Bimal K. Matilal (in Oxford) and the phenomenologist J. N. Mohanty (in Philadelphia).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The volume under review is important for... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-collected-writings-of-jaysankar-lal-shaw-indian-analytic-and-anglophone-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/everything-in-everything-anaxagorass-metaphysics/ 2017-11-08T18:00:00-0500 2017-11-08T18:00:00-0500 Everything in Everything: Anaxagoras's Metaphysics Anna Marmodoro <p>2017.11.07 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/everything-in-everything-anaxagorass-metaphysics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Anna Marmodoro, <em>Everything in Everything: Anaxagoras's Metaphysics</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 214 pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190611972.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by John Palmer, University of Florida</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Anna Marmodoro's Anaxagoras is a power ontologist with a theory of extreme mixture that makes his world gunky rather than atomic. The fundamental elements of his physical system -- the hot and the cold, the moist and the dry, and so on -- are tropes that are physical but not material: they are instances of opposite physical properties that are not borne by any material substratum. They are also instances of causal powers that are constantly active and exercising their constitutional causal role, though they are manifest only at higher concentrations within the bundles constituting stuffs and organisms. Because Marmodoro's Anaxagoras rejects the possibility of creation from, or destruction into, nothing, and also the possibility that anything might come to... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/everything-in-everything-anaxagorass-metaphysics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/pragmatism-as-a-way-of-life-the-lasting-legacy-of-william-james-and-john-dewey/ 2017-11-07T22:00:00-0500 2017-11-07T22:00:00-0500 Pragmatism as a Way of Life: The Lasting Legacy of William James and John Dewey Hilary Putnam and Ruth Anna Putnam <p>2017.11.06 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/pragmatism-as-a-way-of-life-the-lasting-legacy-of-william-james-and-john-dewey/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Hilary Putnam and Ruth Anna Putnam, <em>Pragmatism as a Way of Life: The Lasting Legacy of William James and John Dewey</em>, David Macarthur (ed.), Belknap Press, 2017, 496 pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674967502.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Boersema, Pacific University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">When Hilary Putnam (HP) passed away in 2016, obituaries appeared in the New York Times and other venues. He was called a "giant of modern philosophy," and, indeed, among academic philosophers he was universally recognized as having been influential in a variety of areas, with a number of his articles anthologized in a wide range of publications. While known to some philosophers, HP's wife, Ruth Anna Putnam (RAP) has not received the level of recognition or accolade as HP. This current book is in part an attempt to address and respond to this discrepancy. The book contains a brief introduction by the editor, David Macarthur, followed by twenty-seven essays. Ten of the essays were authored by HP, fifteen by RAP,... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/pragmatism-as-a-way-of-life-the-lasting-legacy-of-william-james-and-john-dewey/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/artistic-license-the-philosophical-problems-of-copyright-and-appropriation/ 2017-11-07T18:00:00-0500 2017-11-07T18:00:00-0500 Artistic License: The Philosophical Problems of Copyright and Appropriation Darren Hudson Hick <p>2017.11.05 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/artistic-license-the-philosophical-problems-of-copyright-and-appropriation/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Darren Hudson Hick, <em>Artistic License: The Philosophical Problems of Copyright and Appropriation</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 231pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780226460246.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brian Soucek, University of California, Davis</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Darren Hudson Hick is a rarity: a sophisticated philosopher of art who understands and cares about the law. His new book has a lot to teach philosophers about how the law both protects authors' rights and limits them, often to protect others who want to sample, quote, adapt, or appropriate existing works within their own. Philosophers of art who care about artistic practice can learn, not only from Hick's rich and varied examples, but also from his account of one of the great forces shaping that practice. Hick's account of copyright is sometimes descriptive, sometimes revisionary, and thus has something to teach lawyers as well. But deciding exactly what lessons the law, with its own distinctive interests, should take away... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/artistic-license-the-philosophical-problems-of-copyright-and-appropriation/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/machiavellis-politics/ 2017-11-06T20:00:00-0500 2017-11-06T20:00:00-0500 Machiavelli's Politics Catherine H. Zuckert <p>2017.11.04 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/machiavellis-politics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Catherine H. Zuckert,<em> Machiavelli's Politics</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 477pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226434803.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Cary J. Nederman, Texas A&amp;M University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Catherine Zuckert is among the leading historians of Western political thought, her scholarship over the years covering an impressive range of topics and epochs, from Plato to American political philosophy, not to mention exposition of the ideas of the influential German-American philosopher Leo Strauss. And, of course, as this book attests, she has contributed significantly to the study of Niccolò Machiavelli, the famous (and, for some, notorious) sixteenth-century political author, the mention of whose very name often elicits a quite visceral reaction from a surprisingly broad audience. The volume under review represents the fruits of Zuckert's considerable reflections on Machiavelli's writings, containing both previously published and unpublished material.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">As an alert to the reader, it... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/machiavellis-politics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/just-life-bioethics-and-the-future-of-sexual-difference/ 2017-11-05T20:00:00-0500 2017-11-05T20:00:00-0500 Just Life: Bioethics and the Future of Sexual Difference Mary C. Rawlinson <p>2017.11.03 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/just-life-bioethics-and-the-future-of-sexual-difference/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Mary C. Rawlinson, <em>Just Life: Bioethics and the Future of Sexual Difference</em>, Columbia University Press, 2016, 296pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN <span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white"><span style="letter-spacing:.55pt">9780231171755.</span></span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Catherine Mills, Monash University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Mary Rawlinson's book is more philosophically ambitious than much of what is published in bioethics these days. A respected Irigaray scholar, Rawlinson brings this expertise in theories of sexual difference to bear on debates in bioethics, especially in regards to food ethics, to generate what she calls an "ethics of life." Throughout the book, she develops a strong critique of the rights-based framework of moral and political philosophy, arguing that this is founded on a notion of women's bodies as property. In its stead, she makes a case for reorienting ethical thought around the generativity of women's bodies. The book is organised in four parts, the first of which is dedicated to developing the critical stance in relation to rights-based... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/just-life-bioethics-and-the-future-of-sexual-difference/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/sociality-and-normativity-for-robots-philosophical-inquiries-into-human-robot-interactions/ 2017-11-02T20:00:00-0400 2017-11-03T10:52:18-0400 Sociality and Normativity for Robots: Philosophical Inquiries into Human-Robot Interactions Hakli, Raul and Johanna Seibt (eds.) <p>2017.11.02 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/sociality-and-normativity-for-robots-philosophical-inquiries-into-human-robot-interactions/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Hakli, Raul and Johanna Seibt (eds.), <em>Sociality and Normativity for Robots: Philosophical Inquiries into Human-Robot Interactions</em>, Springer, 2017, 267pp, $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9783319531311.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robin L. Zebrowski, Beloit College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="background:white">In March of 2017, a <a href="https://youtu.be/h1E-FlguwGw">video</a> of a small child standing in the street calling out to a broken water heater sitting curbside went viral on the internet. The water heater looked like a robot, with big saucer eyes and a cylindrical body, but only accidentally so. The child calls out to the robot and even when it doesn't respond, she hugs it and says, "I love you robot! I love you robot!"<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span style="background:white">[1]</span></span></span></a> What did we all love so much about this video? I'd argue it was the apparent social interaction between the child and the non-robot, a beautiful illustration of the ways in which people are often willing to... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/sociality-and-normativity-for-robots-philosophical-inquiries-into-human-robot-interactions/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-logic-of-being-realism-truth-and-time/ 2017-11-01T20:00:00-0400 2017-11-01T20:00:00-0400 The Logic of Being: Realism, Truth, and Time Paul M. Livingston <p>2017.11.01 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-logic-of-being-realism-truth-and-time/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Paul M. Livingston, <em>The Logic of Being: Realism, Truth, and Time</em>, Northwestern University Press, 2017,<em> </em>257pp., $99.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780810135208.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jeffrey Bell, Southeastern Louisiana University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Paul Livingston draws from an impressive array of philosophical work to address his 'central problem,' which is, as he states it, 'that of the relationship of <em>thought</em> to <em>time</em>, whereby both being and becoming are to be thought and understood within the <em>life</em> of a being that is itself temporally situated' (xi). Although this book can be read as a book on Heidegger, for Heidegger's work looms largest in Livingston's approach to tackling his central problem, it is also a book that demonstrates the centrality of its concerns to both the analytic and continental traditions in philosophy. Livingston draws freely and liberally from Frege, Davidson, Dummett, Wittgenstein, and importantly and strategically from Cantor and Gödel. What Livingston offers us, therefore,... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-logic-of-being-realism-truth-and-time/" >Read More</a> </p>