tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2017-07-20T23:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/philosophy-technology-and-the-environment/ 2017-07-20T23:00:00-0400 2017-07-20T23:00:00-0400 Philosophy, Technology, and the Environment David M. Kaplan, ed <p>2017.07.16 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/philosophy-technology-and-the-environment/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">David M. Kaplan, ed., <em>Philosophy, Technology, and the Environment</em>, MIT Press, 2017, ix + 255 pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780262533164</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Steven Vogel, Denison University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The important and indeed admirable idea motivating this anthology is that environmental philosophy and the philosophy of technology, two fields that in recent decades have made significant strides, have much in common and ought to be more in conversation with each other than has generally been the case. Yet this collection is a bit of a disappointment, impressive more in its ambition than its carry-through, and leaves one wishing for a deeper investigation of the relationship between the two fields, beginning with more of a serious attempt to define what they actually are and what the connection is between the objects with which they claim to concern themselves.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The trouble starts early, in the first... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/philosophy-technology-and-the-environment/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-meaning-of-the-wave-function-in-search-of-the-ontology-of-quantum-mechanics/ 2017-07-20T18:00:00-0400 2017-07-20T18:00:00-0400 The Meaning of the Wave Function: In Search of the Ontology of Quantum Mechanics Shan Gao <p>2017.07.15 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-meaning-of-the-wave-function-in-search-of-the-ontology-of-quantum-mechanics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Shan Gao, The Meaning of the Wave Function: In Search of the Ontology of Quantum Mechanics, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 189pp., $140, ISBN: 9781107124356.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mario Hubert, University of Lausanne</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">What is the meaning of the wave-function? After almost 100 years since the inception of quantum mechanics, is it still possible to say something new on what the wave-function is supposed to be? Yes, it is. And Shan Gao managed to do so with his newest book. Here we learn what contemporary physicists and philosophers think about the wave-function; we learn about the de Broglie-Bohm theory, the GRW collapse theory, the gravity-induced collapse theory by Roger Penrose, and the famous PBR theorem; we learn about Schrödinger's original idea that the wave-function represents charge densities; we learn about the notorious measurement problem and its consequences; we learn about the challenges to find a consistent relativistic quantum theory; and we learn, of... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-meaning-of-the-wave-function-in-search-of-the-ontology-of-quantum-mechanics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/heideggers-shadow-kant-husserl-and-the-transcendental-turn/ 2017-07-19T20:00:00-0400 2017-07-19T20:00:00-0400 Heidegger's Shadow: Kant, Husserl and the Transcendental Turn Chad Engelland <p>2017.07.14 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/heideggers-shadow-kant-husserl-and-the-transcendental-turn/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Chad Engelland, <em>Heidegger's Shadow: Kant, Husserl and the Transcendental Turn</em>, Routledge, 2017, xiv + 275pp., $140 (hbk), ISBN 9781138181878.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Sacha Golob, King's College London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">One way to understand the trajectory of Heidegger's thought is as a series of engagements with the possibilities and the risks inherent in transcendental philosophy. This approach is the basis of Engelland's book; as he elegantly puts it, the transcendental functions throughout Heidegger's career as the 'shadow' which he cannot jump over, the hermeneutic situation out of which he writes (p.206). Heidegger's attitude to the transcendental evidently undergoes complex shifts, shifts mediated in part by his successive dialogues with Husserl, Kant, and others, but Engelland's central argument is that this attitude is never purely negative: as he sees it, even the later Heidegger offers what is effectively a 'transcendental critique of transcendence' (p.172). In this, the text challenges the oft... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/heideggers-shadow-kant-husserl-and-the-transcendental-turn/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/human-existence-and-transcendence/ 2017-07-18T20:00:00-0400 2017-07-18T20:00:00-0400 Human Existence and Transcendence Jean Wahl <p>2017.07.13 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/human-existence-and-transcendence/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jean Wahl, <em>Human Existence and Transcendence</em>, William Hackett (tr. and ed.), University of Notre Dame Press, 2016, 151pp., $40.00 (hbk.), ISBN 9780268101060.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Edward Baring, Drew University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In twentieth-century French intellectual history, Jean Wahl is a ubiquitous if elusive figure. He was the author of the essay and then book, "Vers le concret [towards the concrete]," whose title became a rallying cry for critics of French idealism in the 1930s. Wahl then gained fame for guiding the reception of many of the main non-French sources for existentialism: he wrote the highly respected <em>Études Kierkegaardiennes</em> in 1938, which was an important reference point for scholars both in France and elsewhere, and his readings of Hegel, Heidegger, Nietzsche, and Jaspers set the standard against which a generation of thinkers developed their own interpretations. Later, his books <em>A</em> <em>Short History of Existentialism </em>(1949) and <em>Philosophies of Existence</em> (1959)<em> </em>served as... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/human-existence-and-transcendence/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/kants-inferentialism-the-case-against-hume/ 2017-07-17T18:00:00-0400 2017-07-17T18:00:00-0400 Kant's Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume David Landy <p>2017.07.12 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kants-inferentialism-the-case-against-hume/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">David Landy, <em>Kant's Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume</em>, Routledge, 2015, 308pp., $49.95, ISBN 9781138062795.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Timothy Rosenkoetter, Dartmouth College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The interpretation on offer in this ambitious work is an attempt to build upon the insight that "Kant's theory is of a piece with Hume's: they are both theories according to which complex states of affairs are represented as such by forming <em>pictures</em> of such states of affairs" (107), pictures that Kant calls "intuitions." Moreover, Kant, in insisting against Hume that there is a species of representation that is categorically different from images, is not proposing a wholly independent mode of representation, as one finds in the classical rationalists. Instead, Kant conceives of the ability of concepts to represent as parasitic on the representational power of intuitions. While intuitions represent objects, "what a concept represents is not an object but... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kants-inferentialism-the-case-against-hume/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/rawls-political-liberalism-and-reasonable-faith/ 2017-07-16T20:00:00-0400 2017-07-16T20:00:00-0400 Rawls, Political Liberalism and Reasonable Faith Paul Weithman <p>2017.07.11 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/rawls-political-liberalism-and-reasonable-faith/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Paul Weithman, <em>Rawls, Political Liberalism and Reasonable Faith</em>,<em> </em>Cambridge University Press, 2016, 255pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107147430.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David A. Reidy, University of Tennessee</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Paul Weithman is among the very best of Rawls's expositors and critics. This volume collects nine previously published essays, the earliest from the mid-1990s, and a previously unpublished one. They are unified by a concern with Rawls's argument for the inherent stability of justice as fairness, an argument set out initially in <em>A Theory of Justice</em> and then revised in <em>Political Liberalism</em> and <em>The Law of Peoples</em>, and with the moral psychology and political sociology upon which it rests. They cast considerable light on Rawls's project and serve as a nice complement and/or introduction to Weithman's more detailed and sustained study in <em>Why Political Liberalism? </em>The previously published essays appeared in a wide range of journals and edited collections. Their... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/rawls-political-liberalism-and-reasonable-faith/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/essays-on-paradoxes/ 2017-07-13T23:00:00-0400 2017-07-13T23:00:00-0400 Essays on Paradoxes Terence Horgan <p>2017.07.11 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/essays-on-paradoxes/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Terence Horgan,  <em>Essays on Paradoxes</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 336pp, $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199858422.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Colin R. Caret, Yonsei University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">There are many insights to be gleaned from this book, but perhaps the most important is this: what at first seem like solutions to disparate problems may, in fact, turn out to be parts of a bigger picture. This is a heartening thought for any scholars who find their attention drawn to multiple topics at the same time. The essays in this collection present Terence Horgan's considered views on the Newcomb problem, the Monty Hall problem, the Two-Envelope Paradox, the sorites paradox, and the Sleeping Beauty problem. The titular paradoxes, however, largely serve as loci for reflection on practical rationality and epistemic probability. It is an engaging collection full of tantalizing ideas, foremost amongst which is an attack on the... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/essays-on-paradoxes/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-ethics-of-time-a-phenomenology-and-hermeneutics-of-change/ 2017-07-13T18:00:00-0400 2017-07-13T18:00:00-0400 The Ethics of Time: A Phenomenology and Hermeneutics of Change John Panteleimon Manoussakis <p>2017.07.09 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-ethics-of-time-a-phenomenology-and-hermeneutics-of-change/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">John Panteleimon Manoussakis,</span> <em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white; border:none windowtext 1.0pt; padding:0in">The Ethics of Time: A Phenomenology and Hermeneutics of Change</span></em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">, Bloomsbury Press, 2017, 209pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474299169.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Felix Ó Murchadha, National University of Ireland, Galway</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="background:white">This is a rich and carefully structured book, which develops an account of time as essential to ethics through a discussion of phenomenological, theological and psychoanalytic themes. The ethics <em>of </em>time is to be read both as subjective and objective genitive: the temporal nature of ethics and the ethical nature of time. Time is to be understood here as movement and change, and central to ethics is the movement motivated by the perception of imperfection, of evil, guided by a sense of the good. The fundamental point here is that ethics and time are interrelated because time is only possible through a consciousness which is eschatologically orientated -- which glimpses perfection. What this means -- and this is what... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-ethics-of-time-a-phenomenology-and-hermeneutics-of-change/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/resistance-of-the-sensible-world-an-introduction-to-merleau-ponty/ 2017-07-12T20:00:00-0400 2017-07-12T20:00:00-0400 Resistance of the Sensible World: An Introduction to Merleau-Ponty Emmanuel Alloa <p>2017.07.08 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/resistance-of-the-sensible-world-an-introduction-to-merleau-ponty/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Emmanuel Alloa, <em>Resistance of the Sensible World: An Introduction to Merleau-Ponty</em>, Jane Todd (tr.), Fordham University Press, 2017, 128pp., $28.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780823275687.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Morris, Concordia University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Emmanuel Alloa's insightful book compellingly shows how Maurice Merleau-Ponty's philosophy is oriented by a resistance manifest in things and the sensible world. This resistance counters philosophical efforts at seeking (at least in principle) fully clarified accounts of things, others, and ourselves. Where ideologies of transparency (12) encounter this resistance as a problem, Merleau-Ponty finds it integral to philosophy, animating philosophical questions and granting philosophy things to think about in the first place. In effect, Merleau-Ponty recasts the transcendental condition of philosophy as an as yet indeterminate resistance operative prior to philosophy that can never be fully exhausted by it. Alloa's conclusion pushes these results about resistance beyond Merleau-Ponty, to show how they require a methodological transformation of philosophy. Altogether, as... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/resistance-of-the-sensible-world-an-introduction-to-merleau-ponty/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/leibniz-on-compossibility-and-possible-worlds/ 2017-07-11T18:00:00-0400 2017-07-11T18:00:00-0400 Leibniz on Compossibility and Possible Worlds Gregory Brown and Yual Chiek (eds.) <p>2017.07.07 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/leibniz-on-compossibility-and-possible-worlds/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Gregory Brown and Yual Chiek (eds.), <em>Leibniz on Compossibility and Possible Worlds</em>, Springer, 2016, 256pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9783319426938.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jeffrey K. McDonough, Harvard University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The old chestnut asks: why something rather than nothing? Why birds and bees and sunshine in the meadows? Leibniz's reply is swift and easy: because existence is good. God creates because it is good that there are birds and bees and sunshine in the meadows. The old query is answered but a new one emerges. If existence is good, why doesn't God create <em>more</em>? Why not mountains of gold and rivers of chocolate? Why not a Caesar who stops, a Judas who doesn't sin?</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Leibniz maintains that God does not actualize all possibilities because not all possible substances are compossible. That is to say, he insists that God cannot create all possible substances together. But... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/leibniz-on-compossibility-and-possible-worlds/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/trial-3/ 2017-07-10T20:00:00-0400 2017-07-10T20:00:00-0400 The Cambridge Companion to Popper Jeremy Shearmur and Geoffrey Stokes (eds.) <p>2017.07.06 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/trial-3/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jeremy Shearmur and Geoffrey Stokes (eds.), <em>The Cambridge Companion to Popper</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 394pp., $34.99 (pbk), ISBN 9780521672429.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Abraham Stone and Paul A. Roth, University of California-Santa Cruz</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The cover of this volume features a smiling visage of Popper, an image that belies the reality of the man, a harsh and unrelenting critic of all and sundry. Perhaps unsurprisingly then, Popper's philosophical heritage also proves elusive and ambiguous. For while certain signature doctrines remain firmly associated with him -- falsifiability, critical rationalism, his particular notions of an open society and historicism -- their heritage remains unclear and uncertain. Assessing these views in a larger context one would hope to be a central task of the volume under review. But such an appraisal would require negotiating between at least two relatively closed societies: that (ironically) of contemporary Popperians, and that of contemporary mainstream analytic philosophy. The essays in this... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/trial-3/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-social-contexts-of-intellectual-virtue-knowledge-as-a-team-achievement/ 2017-07-09T23:00:00-0400 2017-07-10T12:58:25-0400 The Social Contexts of Intellectual Virtue: Knowledge as a Team Achievement Adam Green <p>2017.07.05 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-social-contexts-of-intellectual-virtue-knowledge-as-a-team-achievement/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Adam Green, <em>The Social Contexts of Intellectual Virtue: Knowledge as a Team Achievement</em>, Routledge, 2017, 245pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138236356.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Joshua C. Thurow, The University of Texas at San Antonio</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Virtue epistemology, of the sort developed by Ernest Sosa and John Greco, has risen to become one of the most plausible accounts of knowledge, competing alongside evidentialism, reliabilism, and Williamson-style knowledge-first epistemology. But like these other views, virtue epistemology has been developed primarily from an individualistic perspective on knowledge: a single person, using his or her epistemic abilities, coming to a belief. Adam Green thinks that taking a more social perspective will produce a richer and more plausible version of virtue epistemology -- one that can avoid various objections to credit views of knowledge and that can deepen our understanding of both epistemic injustice and the problem of disagreement.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Green develops a version of Greco's... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-social-contexts-of-intellectual-virtue-knowledge-as-a-team-achievement/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/trial/ 2017-07-09T18:00:00-0400 2017-07-10T10:52:04-0400 Truth, Objects, Infinity: New Perspectives on the Philosophy of Paul Benacerraf Fabrice Pataut (ed.) <p>2017.07.04 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/trial/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Fabrice Pataut (ed.), <em>Truth, Objects, Infinity: New Perspectives on the Philosophy of Paul Benacerraf</em>, Springer, 2016, 309pp., $149.00 (hbk), <span style="background:white">ISBN </span>9783319459783<span style="background:white">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by A.C. Paseau, University of Oxford</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Paul Benacerraf's influence on recent philosophy of mathematics is unrivalled. His articles 'What Numbers Could Not Be' (WNCNB) and 'Mathematical Truth' remain cornerstones of the subject, while the two editions of 'Benacerraf and Putnam' virtually defined the discipline in the late 20th century. Benacerraf's published output -- fourteen articles, including a pair in this collection, plus the odd review, interview and introduction -- is spare and judicious, qualities reflected in his writing. The latter is also playful, memorably so. Would WNCNB have so fired the collective imagination had its protagonists not been called Jonny and Ernie? Does the title of its last section, 'Way Out', herald a solution, or warn us of its fanciful conclusions? Can you think of a... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/trial/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/toleration-and-understanding-in-locke/ 2017-07-06T23:00:00-0400 2017-07-06T23:00:00-0400 Toleration and Understanding in Locke Nicholas Jolley <p>2017.07.03 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/toleration-and-understanding-in-locke/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Nicholas Jolley, <em>Toleration and Understanding in Locke</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 175pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198791706.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Victor Nuovo, Middlebury College and Harris Manchester College, Oxford</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">A principal purpose of Nicholas Jolley's book is to demonstrate the unity of Locke's thought, especially as expressed in his major works. The sort of unity he has in mind is thematic not systematic, for he acknowledges that these works arose under different occasions, were meant to address diverse problems, practical and theoretical, and so were not designed as expressions of a single intellectual project. However, they were written by a profound philosophical thinker who thought broadly and deeply about whatever concerned him, and who was disposed by his philosophical nature to base his judgements on principles that were far-reaching and fundamental. It seems reasonable, therefore, to suppose that these writings, however diverse, should express an underlying unity of thought... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/toleration-and-understanding-in-locke/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/peirce-and-the-conduct-of-life-sentiment-and-instinct-in-ethics-and-religion/ 2017-07-06T18:00:00-0400 2017-07-06T18:00:00-0400 Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion Richard Kenneth Atkins <p>2017.07.02 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/peirce-and-the-conduct-of-life-sentiment-and-instinct-in-ethics-and-religion/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Richard Kenneth Atkins, <em>Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 231pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107161306<span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by  Diana B. Heney, Fordham University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Richard Kenneth Atkins presents an articulation and defense of the practical philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. He begins by acknowledging the rather large elephant in the room: Peirce is “not well known for his practical philosophy” (1). The overarching purpose of this volume is to correct the view that what Peirce has to offer by way of advice for the conduct of life is minimal at best. The project is an ambitious one, for this view has been widespread even among Peirce scholars and historians of American pragmatism. Indeed, perhaps the most common view has been that what Peirce does offer concerning conduct is not merely minimal, but also positively unsavoury. By presenting and developing Peirce’s ideas about the conduct... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/peirce-and-the-conduct-of-life-sentiment-and-instinct-in-ethics-and-religion/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/facts-and-values-the-ethics-and-metaphysics-of-normativity/ 2017-07-05T20:00:00-0400 2017-07-05T20:00:00-0400 Facts and Values: The Ethics and Metaphysics of Normativity Giancarlo Marchetti and Sarin Marchetti (eds.) <p>2017.07.01 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/facts-and-values-the-ethics-and-metaphysics-of-normativity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Giancarlo Marchetti and Sarin Marchetti (eds.), <em>Facts and Values: The Ethics and Metaphysics of Normativity</em>, Routledge, 2017, 297pp., $145.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138955516.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Neil Sinclair, University of Nottingham</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This volume seeks to provide a critical perspective on the supposed fact/value distinction. In fact, it aims to provide <em>multiple</em> critiques of this 'absolute dichotomy', based in at least three disparate intellectual traditions: pragmatism, critical theory and analytic meta-ethics. The volume contains multiple representatives of each tradition, as well as chapters on the philosophy of law and environmental ethics. It is aimed at advanced scholars and dedicated to Hilary Putnam, whose essay on the collapse of the fact/value dichotomy is essential background for many of the papers. I think it only partially succeeds in meeting its aim, owing largely to the thematic fragmentation of the chapters. For all that, there are several excellent papers here, worth reading irrespective of their... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/facts-and-values-the-ethics-and-metaphysics-of-normativity/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/natural-kinds-and-genesis-the-classification-of-material-entities/ 2017-06-29T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-29T20:00:00-0400 Natural Kinds and Genesis: The Classification of Material Entities Stewart Umphrey <p>2017.06.31 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/natural-kinds-and-genesis-the-classification-of-material-entities/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Stewart Umphrey, <em>Natural Kinds and Genesis: The Classification of Material Entities</em>, Lexington, 2016, 173pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498531412.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jonathan Davies, University of Exeter</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This monograph aims to set out and defend a realist position about natural kinds. Stewart Umphrey’s argument touches on a range of traditional metaphysical topics, as well as exploring the role of natural-kinds thinking in the sciences. His aim is to defend the claim that there exist “irreducibly thick particulars of the sort presupposed in everyday life” with at least some of these “belong[ing] to natural kinds in virtue of their essences; and that these kinds, as types, are real substantive universals” (p. 41). The general pattern of argumentation is to lay out a range of possible objections to Umphrey’s various realisms, and to suggest that, on balance, we are justified in accepting that there are in fact natural kinds... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/natural-kinds-and-genesis-the-classification-of-material-entities/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/understanding-foucault-understanding-modernism/ 2017-06-28T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-28T20:00:00-0400 Understanding Foucault, Understanding Modernism David Scott (ed.) <p>2017.06.30 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/understanding-foucault-understanding-modernism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">David Scott (ed.), <em>Understanding Foucault, Understanding Modernism</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 265pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781628927702.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Corey McCall, Elmira College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This edited collection is the third volume in a series that examines key philosophers' work in relationship to modernism. As stated in the series preface, the goal is to make key writings of each thinker accessible while also relating their works to modernism. Each volume in the series has three sections: a first, which focuses on "conceptualizing" the volume's philosopher, a second "on aesthetics, which "maps connections between modernist works and the philosophical figure," while the final section consists of brief essays on key terms relevant for understanding the philosopher's relationship to modernism (vii). In theory, this structure should appeal to a wide audience, for readers less familiar with Foucault will find the first and third sections helpful for understanding... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/understanding-foucault-understanding-modernism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-aesthetics-and-ethics-of-copying/ 2017-06-27T18:00:00-0400 2017-06-27T18:00:00-0400 The Aesthetics and Ethics of Copying Darren Hudson Hick and Reinold Schmücker (eds.) <p>2017.06.29 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-aesthetics-and-ethics-of-copying/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Darren Hudson Hick and Reinold Schmücker (eds.), <em>The Aesthetics and Ethics of Copying</em>, Bloomsbury, 2016, 432pp., $94.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474254519.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Wesley D. Cray, Texas Christian University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The title of this volume might suggest that its contents converge upon a rather narrow set of issues: aesthetic and ethical issues pertaining to the act of copying. One might expect to find contributions building mostly on formative work by philosophers such as Nelson Goodman and Denis Dutton and, hence, anticipate discussions couched largely within the framework of contemporary analytic aesthetics. Working through the twenty essays and the introduction, however, the reader will quickly notice that, while these initial expectations may not be entirely inaccurate, they simply do not do justice to the impressive breadth of work being done here.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The volume, edited by Darren Hudson Hick and Reinold Schmücker, compiles original essays by not... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-aesthetics-and-ethics-of-copying/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/a-fortunate-universe-life-in-a-finely-tuned-cosmos/ 2017-06-26T20:00:00-0400 2017-06-27T09:25:40-0400 A Fortunate Universe: Life in a Finely Tuned Cosmos Geraint F. Lewis and Luke A. Barnes <p>2017.06.28 : <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-fortunate-universe-life-in-a-finely-tuned-cosmos/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Geraint F. Lewis and Luke A. Barnes, <em>A Fortunate Universe: Life in a Finely Tuned Cosmos</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 373pp., $27.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107156616.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Yann Benétreau-Dupin, University of Pittsburgh</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This new book by cosmologists Geraint F. Lewis and Luke A. Barnes is another entry in the long list of cosmology-centered physics books intended for a large audience. While many such books aim at advancing a novel scientific theory,<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">1</span></span></a> this one has no such scientific pretense. Its goals are to assert that the universe is fine-tuned for life, to defend that this fact can reasonably motivate further scientific inquiry as to why it is so, and to show that the multiverse and intelligent design hypotheses are reasonable proposals to explain this fine-tuning. This book's potential contribution, therefore, lies in how convincingly and efficiently it can make that case.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">There... <br /> <p><a href="http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-fortunate-universe-life-in-a-finely-tuned-cosmos/" >Read More</a> </p>