tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2021-05-30T12:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-disintegration-of-community-on-jorge-portillas-social-and-political-philosophy-with-translations-of-selected-essays/ 2021-05-30T12:00:00-0400 2021-05-30T12:00:00-0400 The Disintegration of Community: On Jorge Portilla's Social and Political Philosophy, with Translations of Selected Essays Carlos Sánchez and Francisco Gallegos <p>2021.05.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-disintegration-of-community-on-jorge-portillas-social-and-political-philosophy-with-translations-of-selected-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Carlos Sánchez and Francisco Gallegos, <em>The Disintegration of Community: On Jorge Portilla's Social and Political Philosophy, with Translations of Selected Essays</em>, SUNY Press, 2020, 225pp., $32.95 (pbk), ISBN9781438480107.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Iain Thomson, University of New Mexico</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Carlos Sánchez and Francisco Gallegos's collaborative book is a creative and impressive work, at once insightful, imaginative, and illuminating. Here three original philosophical voices -- those of Sánchez, Gallegos, and Jorge Portilla himself -- engage in a wide-ranging and often fascinating three-person dialogue (or trialogue), opening readers' eyes to promising new interpretive paths and raising surprisingly timely questions sure to provoke further discussion and debate.</span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Sánchez's increasingly well-known earlier book, <em>The Suspension of Seriousness: On the Phenomenology of Jorge Portilla </em>(SUNY Press, 2012), translates and interprets Portilla's 1966 masterpiece on "The phenomenology of <em>relajo</em>," Portilla's (apparently untranslatable) name for the distinctive comportmental attunement of those inveterate jokers who persistently reject all the demands and rewards... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-disintegration-of-community-on-jorge-portillas-social-and-political-philosophy-with-translations-of-selected-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/justice-in-transactions-a-theory-of-contract-law/ 2021-05-13T12:00:00-0400 2021-05-14T17:08:52-0400 Justice in Transactions: A Theory of Contract Law Peter Benson <p>2021.05.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/justice-in-transactions-a-theory-of-contract-law/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Peter Benson, <em>Justice in Transactions: </em><em>A Theory of Contract Law</em>, Harvard University Press, 2019, 624pp., $88.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674237599.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Simone M. Sepe, University of Arizona</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal"><em>Central Theses</em></span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Peter Benson's book is probably one of the most important and unified works ever written in contract theory. The book's main effort is an attempt at organically revisiting contract theory based on a liberal conception of justice. In pursuing this effort, the book provides a coherent rationale for all the major doctrines of principles in contracts. This is a necessary exercise (one that clearly draws on years of research and engagement) to show that a liberal conception of justice can serve as an organizational idea for the law of contracts that is fully internal to its system of principles.</span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Benson's deontological approach is remarkably distinct from the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/justice-in-transactions-a-theory-of-contract-law/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-tools-of-metaphysics-and-the-metaphysics-of-science/ 2021-05-09T12:00:00-0400 2021-05-09T12:00:00-0400 The Tools of Metaphysics and the Metaphysics of Science Theodore Sider <p>2021.05.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-tools-of-metaphysics-and-the-metaphysics-of-science/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal"><strong>Theodore Sider, <em>The Tools of Metaphysics and the Metaphysics of Science</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 233pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198811565.</strong></span></span></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Scott Dixon, Ashoka University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Theodore Sider's book is an important contribution to discussions of cutting edge topics lying at the intersection of metaphysics and the philosophies of mathematics and science. Early on in the book, Sider describes his thesis as the claim that 'the choice of metaphysical tools matters to first-order metaphysics, especially when it comes to "structuralist" positions in the metaphysics of science and mathematics' (3). Structuralist views are those which, in some sense, ontologically "downgrade" certain entities (e.g., numbers, individuals, or posits of scientific theories) relative to the relational framework (the <em>structure</em>) in which they are embedded. Sider is out to explore the prospects for clarifying certain of these structuralist theses by attempting to formulate them with various concepts from postmodal... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-tools-of-metaphysics-and-the-metaphysics-of-science/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-nature-of-human-persons-metaphysics-and-bioethics/ 2021-05-09T12:00:00-0400 2021-05-09T12:00:00-0400 The Nature of Human Persons: Metaphysics and Bioethics Jason T. Eberl <p>2021.05.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-nature-of-human-persons-metaphysics-and-bioethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Jason T. Eberl, <em>The Nature of Human Persons: </em><em>Metaphysics and Bioethics</em>, University of Notre Dame Press, 2020, 405pp., $75.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780268107734.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Patrick Toner, Wake Forest University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">The focus of Jason T. Eberl's new book will come as a shock to nobody who has been reading his excellent contributions to metaphysics and bioethics for the last couple of decades. It is fundamentally a work in analytic metaphysics, drawing heavily on -- and doing some careful historical analysis of -- the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, and applying those metaphysical insights to pressing bioethical matters, such as the nature of death.</span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">The book has two main parts. The first part (Chapters 2-4) explains Thomistic hylemorphism according to Eberl, particularly its theory of human nature. Then he does some nice work explaining some competing theories of human nature, including several varieties of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-nature-of-human-persons-metaphysics-and-bioethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/theorizing-confucian-virtue-politics-the-political-philosophy-of-mencius-and-xunzi/ 2021-05-09T11:00:00-0400 2021-05-09T11:00:00-0400 Theorizing Confucian Virtue Politics: The Political Philosophy of Mencius and Xunzi Sungmoon Kim <p>2021.05.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/theorizing-confucian-virtue-politics-the-political-philosophy-of-mencius-and-xunzi/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Sungmoon Kim, <em>Theorizing Confucian Virtue Politics: The Political Philosophy of Mencius and Xunzi</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2020, 237pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108499422.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Tim Connolly, East Stroudsburg University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Confucian political theory offers a normative vision for contemporary societies that draws on concepts from thinkers in the Chinese philosophical tradition initiated by Confucius (551-479 BCE). Much of the recent work in this area is motivated by dialogue with mainstream Western political theory, focusing on questions of Confucianism's compatibility with liberal democracy. Yet as Sungmoon Kim writes in the opening pages of the book, these attempts to establish dialogue have tended to look at general characteristics of the classical Confucian tradition, giving less attention to internal debates and disagreements within this tradition.</span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Kim's book is devoted to a reconstruction of the different visions of Confucian governance found in Mencius (4th century BCE) and... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/theorizing-confucian-virtue-politics-the-political-philosophy-of-mencius-and-xunzi/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/thinking-and-being/ 2021-05-02T12:00:00-0400 2021-05-02T12:00:00-0400 Thinking and Being Irad Kimhi <p>2021.05.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/thinking-and-being/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Irad Kimhi, <em>Thinking and Being</em>, Harvard University Press, 2018, 166pp., $42.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674967892.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jean-Philippe Narboux, Université Bordeaux Montaigne</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">1. Irad Kimhi's book is in my view one of the most important books in philosophy to have appeared of late. To set it in its proper context, it may help to begin with the following excerpt from a course by Wittgenstein:</span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-left:48px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Thinking, wishing, hoping, believing, and negation all have something in common. The same sort of puzzling questions can be asked about each. How can one wish for a thing that does not happen or hope that something will happen that does not? How can not-<em>p </em>negate <em>p</em>, when <em>p </em>may not be the case, i.e. when nothing corresponds to <em>p</em>? (Wittgenstein 1979: 110-111)</span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Whatever their maieutic... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/thinking-and-being/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/politics-and-negation-for-an-affirmative-philosophy/ 2021-04-18T10:00:00-0400 2021-04-18T10:00:00-0400 Politics and Negation: For an Affirmative Philosophy Roberto Esposito <p>2021.04.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/politics-and-negation-for-an-affirmative-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px"><strong>Roberto Esposito, <em>Politics and Negation: For an Affirmative Philosophy</em>, Zakiya Hanafi (tr.), Polity, 2019, 237pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781509536627.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Gregory Fried, Boston College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Who would have dared contradict Johnny Mercer, who sang that</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-left:48px; margin-top:16px">You've got to accentuate the positive<br> Eliminate the negative<br> Latch on to the affirmative<br> Don't mess with Mr. In-Between<br> No, don't mess with Mr. In-Between</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Well, Roberto Esposito has dared to contradict this seemingly prudent advice. In the book<em>,</em> translated fluently from the Italian by Zakiya Hanafi, Esposito argues that the "mess" that the western tradition now finds itself in, both philosophically and politically, is one brought on by a mistaken relation to the negative, most especially by the conception that, in Mercer's words, "You've got to . . . <em>eliminate</em> the negative." Esposito contends that we must learn "the ways of understanding and practicing the 'affirmativity' of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/politics-and-negation-for-an-affirmative-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/imagining-and-knowing-the-shape-of-fiction/ 2021-04-17T09:00:00-0400 2021-04-17T09:48:56-0400 Imagining and Knowing: The Shape of Fiction Gregory Currie <p>2021.04.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/imagining-and-knowing-the-shape-of-fiction/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Gregory Currie, </span><em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Imagining and Knowing: The Shape of Fiction</span></em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">, Oxford University Press, 2020, 240pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN </span><span style="background:white">9780199656615</span><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Peter Lamarque, University of York, UK</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Few would dispute that, all things considered, some exposure to works of imaginative literature (novels, plays, poems) as part of a rounded education is better than no such exposure. Beyond that, disagreements are rife. Culture wars loom, with anxieties over curriculum choice, gender and racial bias, elitism, contested pedagogic methods, and a disconcerting vagueness about aims sought.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">In this important and polemical book, Gregory Currie sidesteps direct engagement with these heated controversies at the frontline of educational policy but nevertheless shines a penetrating, for some disturbing, light on one of the most prominent lines of defence for a humanistic, literary education, the thought that we can learn from works of fiction in substantial ways: that reading fiction can make us better... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/imagining-and-knowing-the-shape-of-fiction/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/being-and-reason-an-essay-on-spinozas-metaphysics/ 2021-04-11T10:00:00-0400 2021-04-11T10:00:00-0400 Being and Reason: An Essay on Spinoza's Metaphysics Martin Lin <p>2021.04.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/being-and-reason-an-essay-on-spinozas-metaphysics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Martin Lin, <em>Being and Reason: An Essay on Spinoza's Metaphysics</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 200pp., $64.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198834151.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">"To try to find out the reason for everything is very dangerous and leads to nothing but disappointment and dissatisfaction." With this zesty Queen Victoria quote Martin Lin opens the final chapter of his new book on Spinoza's metaphysics. In his introduction, Lin echoes Queen Victoria's admonition, warning the reader of the vices of over-confident rationalism that fails to realize that "the world is full of the contingent and the inexplicable" (2). While mostly sharing Lin's sentiment against hubristic rationalism, I have some reservations about his confidence that the vast terrain of the unexplain<em>ed</em> is also unexplain<em>able</em>. But let's not jump the gun.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Lin's book appears at a particularly exciting time when the study of Spinoza is flourishing and outstanding works... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/being-and-reason-an-essay-on-spinozas-metaphysics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-moral-psychology-of-hope/ 2021-03-26T10:00:00-0400 2021-03-26T10:00:00-0400 The Moral Psychology of Hope Claudia Blöser and Titus Stahl (eds.) <p>2021.03.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-moral-psychology-of-hope/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Claudia <span style="background:white">Blöser </span>and Titus Stahl (eds.), <em>The Moral Psychology of Hope</em>, Rowman and Littlefield, 2020, 302pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781786609724.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Daniel Telech, Polonsky Academy, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Claudia Blöser and Titus Stahl have assembled a wide-ranging volume on the nature, history, and social significance of hope. The volume does not skimp on history; six of its fifteen chapters are focused on the philosophical history of hope, and others include extended discussion of historical figures and traditions. The volume makes contributions, too, to our understanding of the nature of hope, considered both as an attitude and trait (perhaps a virtue) of character. The volume closes with a section on hope's "social contexts", where attention is given to topics like hope's role in political justification and the rationality of hoping for generalized human prosperity in the face of possible environmental collapse. It's a rich volume. I'll have occasion below to touch upon... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-moral-psychology-of-hope/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/rediscovering-political-friendship-aristotles-theory-and-modern-identity-community-and-equality/ 2021-03-16T10:00:00-0400 2021-03-16T10:00:00-0400 Rediscovering Political Friendship: Aristotle's Theory and Modern Identity, Community, and Equality Paul W. Ludwig <p>2021.03.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/rediscovering-political-friendship-aristotles-theory-and-modern-identity-community-and-equality/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px"><strong>Paul W. Ludwig, <em>Rediscovering Political Friendship: Aristotle's Theory and Modern Identity, Community, and Equality</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2020, 347pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107022966.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jonny Thakkar, Swarthmore College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Those of us who live in liberal democracies do not tend to think of ourselves as connected to our fellow citizens by bonds of friendship. Most of us recognize special obligations towards our fellow citizens on account of our shared membership in a given society. We find it natural, for instance, that more of our tax dollars go to welfare programs within our own country than to overseas aid. But if pushed on why that is, we would be unlikely to invoke the notion of friendship. The concept of friendship seems to apply at a fundamentally different scale to the concept of citizenship: even in the era of Facebook, it still evokes relatively small-scale networks that tie individuals together on the basis of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/rediscovering-political-friendship-aristotles-theory-and-modern-identity-community-and-equality/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/hobbess-on-the-citizen-a-critical-guide/ 2021-03-13T14:00:00-0500 2021-03-13T14:00:00-0500 Hobbes's On The Citizen: A Critical Guide Robin Douglass and Johan Olsthoorn (eds.) <p>2021.03.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/hobbess-on-the-citizen-a-critical-guide/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Robin Douglass and Johan Olsthoorn (eds.), <em>Hobbes's </em>On The Citizen<em>: A Critical Guide</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2020, 251pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108421980.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Sandra Leonie Field, Yale-NUS College, Singapore</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">The perennial interest in the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes shows no sign of slowing down. The rush of edited volumes commemorating the 350th anniversary of the publication of his masterpiece <em>Leviathan</em> (1651) has been followed by a steady stream of collections guided by various themes -- Hobbes and the law, feminist interpretations of Hobbes, Hobbes and religion, Hobbes's contemporary relevance -- as well as new general companion volumes every number of years. Robin Douglass and Johan Olsthoorn's book<em> </em>nonetheless makes a distinctive and welcome contribution not addressed by any of the previous volumes. It seeks to determine the political philosophy of Hobbes's less well known book <em>De Cive</em> (1642/1647; referred to throughout the volume as <em>On the Citizen</em>). Although Douglass and Olsthoorn's volume... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/hobbess-on-the-citizen-a-critical-guide/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-ethics-of-capitalism-an-introduction/ 2021-03-12T10:00:00-0500 2021-03-12T10:00:00-0500 The Ethics of Capitalism: An Introduction Daniel Halliday and John Thrasher <p>2021.03.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-ethics-of-capitalism-an-introduction/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Daniel Halliday and John Thrasher, <em>The Ethics of Capitalism: An Introduction</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 288pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190096205.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Marco Meyer, University of Hamburg</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">When teaching seminars on political philosophy, I have sometimes found a fundamental disconnect between my teaching and the expectations of my students. My courses are about tax justice, climate change mitigation, or ethics in finance. Yet some of my students are not convinced that addressing injustices in these areas within a capitalist system can ever amount to much. Is capitalism so deeply rotten, they wonder, that tweaking it misses the bigger picture?</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Daniel Halliday and John Thrasher's<em> </em>book<em> </em>addresses this question head on. The authors have done a great service to teachers of political philosophy and political economy by writing an accessible introduction to political economy from a philosophical perspective. They focus on the question whether capitalism can have moral foundations.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-ethics-of-capitalism-an-introduction/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/transcendence-and-non-naturalism-in-early-chinese-thought/ 2021-03-11T10:00:00-0500 2021-03-11T10:00:00-0500 Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod <p>2021.03.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/transcendence-and-non-naturalism-in-early-chinese-thought/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod, <em>Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought</em>, Bloomsbury, 2021, 245pp., $115.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350082533.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">To paraphrase Kant's words on enlightenment, I propound that on the topic of transcendence and non-naturalism in Chinese and comparative philosophy, although we do not have a reckoned book yet, we finally have a book of reckoning.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod discern two major reasons why scholars assume there is no robust idea of transcendence, and hence, take naturalism as an inevitable lens for interpreting early Chinese thought: Firstly, some of these scholars would like to find in early Chinese thought something that is different from the West, mainly from Christianity. Secondly, some of them would like to find in early Chinese thought something that looks the same as the West, viz., the same as the scientific and analytic... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/transcendence-and-non-naturalism-in-early-chinese-thought/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/metaphysics-of-states-of-affairs-truthmaking-universals-and-a-farewell-to-bradleys-regress/ 2021-03-11T10:00:00-0500 2021-03-11T10:00:00-0500 Metaphysics of States of Affairs: Truthmaking, Universals, and a Farewell to Bradley’s Regress Bo R. Meinertsen <p>2021.03.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/metaphysics-of-states-of-affairs-truthmaking-universals-and-a-farewell-to-bradleys-regress/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Bo R. Meinertsen, <em>Metaphysics of States of Affairs: Truthmaking, Universals, and a Farewell to Bradley’s Regress</em>, Springer, 2018, 174pp., $109.99 (hbk), ISBN 9789811330674.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Katarina Perovic, University of Iowa</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Bo R. Meinertsen's monograph reopens and revisits some of the difficult problems that face a realist about universals. Realism about universals is an old view that has been around since at least Plato and Aristotle, with its most recent systematic defense in the work of Australian philosopher David Armstrong.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">One of the main motivating forces for adoption of universals stems from wanting to provide an ontological ground of genuine resemblance between distinct particular things. Assuming that a red apple, a red phone box, and a red tomato genuinely resemble in respect of <em>being red</em>, a realist can say that what ontologically grounds resemblance in respect of redness is an entity that they all share -- viz., the universal <em>redness</em>. Thus, on... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/metaphysics-of-states-of-affairs-truthmaking-universals-and-a-farewell-to-bradleys-regress/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/meanings-as-species/ 2021-02-20T10:00:00-0500 2021-02-25T11:46:45-0500 Meanings as Species Mark Richard <p>2021.02.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/meanings-as-species/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Mark Richard, <em>Meanings as Species</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 212pp., $72.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198842811.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Indrek Reiland, University of Vienna</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">This book explores the idea that the <em>meanings</em> of words are like biological species. On Mark Richard's view, the meaning of a word in a group's language is what he calls its <em>interpretive common ground</em> or ICG. The ICG of 'cousin' in the English of the residents of Boston is the set of presuppositions about the term they normally make and are expected to make: "that cousins are relatives, that cousins are the children of your folks' sisters and brothers, that people have cousins but dogs and bumblebees do not, etc." (49) Meanings qua ICGs are like species in being historical, process-like entities that can gradually change over time.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">The book is divided into six chapters. In chapter 1, Richard frames... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/meanings-as-species/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-concealed-influence-of-custom-humes-treatise-from-the-inside-out/ 2021-02-13T15:00:00-0500 2021-02-25T11:47:03-0500 The Concealed Influence of Custom: Hume's Treatise from the Inside Out Jay L. Garfield <p>2021.02.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-concealed-influence-of-custom-humes-treatise-from-the-inside-out/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jay L. Garfield, <em>The Concealed Influence of Custom: Hume's Treatise from the Inside Out</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 302pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190933401.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Emily Kelahan, Illinois Wesleyan University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">While hyper specialization is probably inevitable and in some ways good, it threatens to destroy our disciplinary community. There is a formula for success in philosophy that is now explicitly shared with graduate students: find a discrete problem about which little has been written, take a position on it, and try to present and publish the result. The number of people who feel they can co-philosophize with any depth on a topic in any given room at large conferences seems to be shrinking. The popularity of "big picture" views seems to be waning. Jay L. Garfield's book is a refreshing challenge to these trends. It's a book about Hume's <em>Treatise</em> (<em>all </em>of it),<em> </em>written by a scholar whose primary research area isn't Hume... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-concealed-influence-of-custom-humes-treatise-from-the-inside-out/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/the-inheritance-of-wealth-justice-equality-and-the-right-to-bequeath/ 2021-02-13T14:00:00-0500 2021-02-25T11:47:25-0500 The Inheritance of Wealth: Justice, Equality, and the Right to Bequeath Daniel Halliday <p>2021.02.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-inheritance-of-wealth-justice-equality-and-the-right-to-bequeath/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Daniel Halliday, <em>The Inheritance of Wealth: Justice, Equality, and the Right to Bequeath</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 235pp., $45.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198803355.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Blain Neufeld, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">A significant obstacle to the realization of the free and equal status of all citizens within democratic societies is the inheritance of wealth -- or more precisely, the intergenerational accumulation and transfer of wealth within families. The extreme wealth inequality caused by flows of inheritances can render a <em>de jure</em> democratic society a <em>de facto</em> aristocracy, wherein individuals' life-prospects are determined largely by the economic class into which they are born. Because of this, liberal egalitarian justice demands limits on inheritances. John Rawls, for instance, recommends that intergenerational bequeathments and gifts be taxed, so that individuals can acquire only limited amounts of wealth through such processes over the courses of their lifetimes.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title="">[1]</a></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Rawls's treatment of inheritance is quite... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/the-inheritance-of-wealth-justice-equality-and-the-right-to-bequeath/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/jonathan-anomaly-creating-future-people-the-ethics-of-genetic-enhancement/ 2021-02-05T15:00:00-0500 2021-02-25T11:47:41-0500 Creating Future People: The Ethics of Genetic Enhancement Jonathan Anomaly <p>2021.02.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/jonathan-anomaly-creating-future-people-the-ethics-of-genetic-enhancement/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Jonathan Anomaly, </span><em>Creating Future People: The Ethics of Genetic Enhancement</em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">, Routledge, 2020, 109pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780367203122.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Colin Farrelly, Queen's University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Jonathan Anomaly's book describes itself as a "fast- paced primer on how new genetic technologies will enable parents to influence the traits of their children" and this book ably delivers on that description. In fewer than 90 pages Anomaly addresses chapters on cognitive enhancement, moral enhancement, aesthetic enhancement, immuno-enhancement, and synthetic people.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Anomaly's goal in each chapter is to "give a sense of the reasons for and against a particular kind of enhancement, to explain the kinds of collective action problems that access to enhancement technology might generate, and to think through what we should do in response" (x). A distinctive characteristic of Anomaly's approach is that he hopes to raise moral questions "that are <em>informed by science</em> and <em>constrained by... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/jonathan-anomaly-creating-future-people-the-ethics-of-genetic-enhancement/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/reviews/combining-minds-how-to-think-about-composite-subjectivity/ 2021-02-05T15:00:00-0500 2021-02-25T11:47:56-0500 Combining Minds: How to Think about Composite Subjectivity Luke Roelofs <p>2021.02.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/combining-minds-how-to-think-about-composite-subjectivity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Luke Roelofs, <em>Combining Minds: How to Think about Composite Subjectivity</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 336pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190859053.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Eric Schwitzgebel, University of California, Riverside</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Panpsychism is trending. If you're not a panpsychist, you might find this puzzling. According to panpsychism, consciousness is ubiquitous. Even solitary elementary particles have or participate in it. This view might seem patently absurd -- as obviously false a philosophical view as you're likely to encounter. So why are so many excellent philosophers suddenly embracing it?<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title="">[1]</a> If you read Luke Roelofs' book<em>,</em> you will probably not become a panpsychist, but at least you will understand.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Panpsychism, especially in Roelofs' hands, has the advantage of directly confronting two huge puzzles about consciousness that are relatively neglected by non-panpsychists. And panpsychism's biggest apparent downside, its incredible bizarreness (by the standards of ordinary common sense in our current culture), might not... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/reviews/combining-minds-how-to-think-about-composite-subjectivity/" >Read More</a> </p>