tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2020-10-14T13:55:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-phenomenal-basis-of-intentionality/ 2020-10-14T13:55:00-0400 2020-10-14T13:55:00-0400 The Phenomenal Basis of Intentionality Angela Mendelovici <p>2020.10.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-phenomenal-basis-of-intentionality/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Angela Mendelovici, <em>The Phenomenal Basis of Intentionality</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 275pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190863807.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Adam Pautz, Brown University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">When you were born into the world, you began with a basic repertoire of sensory-perceptual experiences representing the world around you. On the basis of those experiences, you acquired beliefs and desires about things in your environment. Then you learned a language and became able to think about a great many things far outside of the "perceptual circle". What is the ground of all this intentionality?</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">In the 1980s and 1990s, many (e.g., Fodor, Millikan, Neander) developed the "reductive externalist program". Tracking relations (informational or teleological relations) between your brain and the world play a foundational role in pinning town original intentionality. More recently, others (e.g., Loar, Horgan and Tienson, Siewert) have developed an opposing "phenomenal intentionality" program. Your conscious experiences... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-phenomenal-basis-of-intentionality/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/moral-knowledge/ 2020-10-14T13:50:00-0400 2020-10-14T13:50:00-0400 Moral Knowledge Sarah McGrath <p>2020.10.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moral-knowledge/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Sarah McGrath, <em>Moral Knowledge</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 218pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198805410.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Phillips, University of Houston</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">In the introduction to the book,<em> </em>Sarah McGrath explains her key aims. She has an overall working hypothesis:</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-left:40px; margin-top:16px">moral knowledge can be acquired in any of the ways in which we acquire ordinary empirical knowledge, and our efforts to acquire and preserve such knowledge are subject to frustration in all of the same ways that our efforts to acquire and preserve ordinary empirical knowledge are. (2)</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">The book is not supposed to constitute a systematic defense of the working hypothesis. Rather, each of its four further substantive chapters -- on reflective equilibrium, moral knowledge from others, observation and experience, and losing moral knowledge -- is intended to be substantially independent. They together advance the case for the working... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moral-knowledge/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/heraclitus-redux-technological-infrastructures-and-scientific-change/ 2020-10-14T13:45:00-0400 2020-10-14T13:45:00-0400 Heraclitus Redux: Technological Infrastructures and Scientific Change Joseph C. Pitt <p>2020.10.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/heraclitus-redux-technological-infrastructures-and-scientific-change/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Joseph C. Pitt, <em>Heraclitus Redux: Technological Infrastructures and Scientific Change</em>, Rowman &amp; Littlefield, 2020, 115pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781786612359.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Matthew D. Lund, Rowan University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Joseph C. Pitt's slim new book argues persuasively that the philosopher's traditional focus on theories as the essence of science is misplaced. This kind of objection is frequently leveled at philosophers by historians and those in science studies, and for good reason. Pitt's critique is much broader and more interesting than the typical one since he argues that the notion of a technological infrastructure -- which, to some degree, becomes the new locus of analysis -- is a complex, extended, and historically conditioned thing that can at best be only partially and imperfectly surveyed, and is, needless to say, not the unique possession of any one discipline.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Pitt's book begins with an impassioned call for Heraclitian inquiry to replace the stagnant... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/heraclitus-redux-technological-infrastructures-and-scientific-change/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/consequentialism-new-directions-new-problems/ 2020-10-14T13:00:00-0400 2020-10-14T13:31:23-0400 Consequentialism: New Directions, New Problems Christian Seidel (ed.) <p>2020.10.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/consequentialism-new-directions-new-problems/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px"><strong>Christian Seidel (ed.), <em>Consequentialism: New Directions, New Problems</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 268pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190270117.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Cummiskey, Bates College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">In this fine collection, Christian Seidel has brought together innovative new work on consequentialism, with a special focus on the theoretical strategy of "consequentializing" agent-centered (deontological) moral theories. It is an excellent resource for anyone seeking to better understand and evaluate the conceptual foundations of consequentialism. Seidel's introduction is a real strength of the book, providing a clear overview of the evolution of consequentialism, which he divides into three waves.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">The first wave is the "conceptual emancipation" of consequentialism from utilitarianism, which is familiar but worth briefly summarizing. Classical utilitarianism defines the right action as that which maximizing the good, with happiness constituting the goodness of outcomes. Utilitarians, of course, debate over the nature of happiness itself (and whether it is... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/consequentialism-new-directions-new-problems/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-epistemic-role-of-consciousness/ 2020-10-14T13:00:00-0400 2020-10-14T13:41:24-0400 The Epistemic Role of Consciousness Declan Smithies <p>2020.10.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-epistemic-role-of-consciousness/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Declan Smithies, <em>The Epistemic Role of Consciousness</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 442pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199917662.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robert J. Howell, Southern Methodist University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Declan Smithies' book is an extraordinarily strong contribution to debates in philosophy of mind and epistemology. It is ambitious and expansive in scope while being extremely rigorously argued. It will be required reading for epistemologists, as well as for philosophers of mind interested in the value of consciousness for our lives as thinkers and knowers. It is, however, a rather long and dense book which can be challenging despite being well-written. Nevertheless, it handily repays the attention and close study it requires.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">The book covers a good deal of terrain, but its main argument is that phenomenal consciousness is important because of the ineliminable role it plays in epistemic justification. One way of putting the thesis is to ask what exactly... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-epistemic-role-of-consciousness/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-emotional-mind-a-control-theory-of-affective-states/ 2020-10-14T13:00:00-0400 2020-10-14T13:43:19-0400 The Emotional Mind: A Control Theory of Affective States Tom Cochrane <p>2020.10.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-emotional-mind-a-control-theory-of-affective-states/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Tom Cochrane, <em>The Emotional Mind: A Control Theory of Affective States</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2019, 244pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN </span><span style="background:white">9781108429672</span><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Colin Klein, The Australian National University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Tom Cochrane's book<em> </em>forges into the philosophy of emotion on a new and powerful vehicle: the idea of <em>valent representations. </em>His project is ambitious. Cochrane uses valent representations to give models of affect, pleasure and pain, emotion, moods, expressive behavior, social intentionality, norms, collective effervescence, inner speech, sentiments, personality, and character. Philosophers interested in any of these topics will find it a rich book, full of nuance and insight.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Chapter 1 introduces the idea of valent representations. They are not necessarily the only primitive kind of mental content, says Cochrane, but they have <em>a </em>kind of content, and form the primitive foundation for other affective states. Valent representation is built around the idea of negative feedback loops. Detection of something in... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-emotional-mind-a-control-theory-of-affective-states/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/disagreement-deference-and-religious-commitment/ 2020-09-30T13:00:00-0400 2020-09-30T13:04:32-0400 Disagreement, Deference, and Religious Commitment John Pittard <p>2020.09.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/disagreement-deference-and-religious-commitment/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="border:none; margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John Pittard, <em>Disagreement, Deference, and Religious Commitment</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 339pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN <span style="background:white">9780190051815</span><span lang="IT" style="background:white">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Matthew A. Benton, Seattle Pacific University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="border:none; margin-bottom:13px">Philosophers working on the epistemology of disagreement have asked how one ought, if at all, to revise one's beliefs or credences when confronted with facts about others who disagree. For it can seem at first blush that the mere existence of disagreement, at least when it is with those who are roughly one's peers with respect to the evidence and arguments bearing on the issue in question, gives one a reason, perhaps even a very strong reason, to reduce one's confidence (as so-called "conciliationists" have argued). Given widespread (inter-religious) disagreement over the nature of the supernatural, the human condition, morality and spirituality, salvation and redemption, and so on, it looks as though most (if not all) religious worldviews cannot be true. And... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/disagreement-deference-and-religious-commitment/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/self-defense-necessity-and-punishment-a-philosophical-analysis/ 2020-09-30T11:00:00-0400 2020-09-30T11:02:00-0400 Self-Defense, Necessity, and Punishment: A Philosophical Analysis Uwe Steinhoff <p>2020.09.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/self-defense-necessity-and-punishment-a-philosophical-analysis/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px"><strong>Uwe Steinhoff, <em>Self-Defense, Necessity, and Punishment: A Philosophical Analysis</em>, Routledge, 2020, 369pp., $160.00 (hbk), ISBN <span style="background:white">9780367407216.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Kimberly Kessler Ferzan, University of Pennsylvania</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">Uwe Steinhoff is an excellent philosopher. He is analytically exacting, wide ranging, and steeped in many of the central debates. He is also an important critic of the dominant strains of discussion within just war theory. Unfortunately, the book<em> </em>does not live up to Steinhoff's promise as a theorist. Although there are some insightful interventions in current debates, the monograph fails to present a clear and coherent vision. Ultimately, it is best read for some of its pieces, as the whole is less than the sum of its parts.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">To begin with, the book is simply an unpleasant read. There is an evident frustration with other philosophers: Steinhoff gets no farther than the second paragraph of his preface before attacking "a... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/self-defense-necessity-and-punishment-a-philosophical-analysis/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/in-the-shadow-of-justice-postwar-liberalism-and-the-remaking-of-political-philosophy/ 2020-09-30T10:00:00-0400 2020-10-07T09:49:11-0400 In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy Katrina Forrester <p>2020.09.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/in-the-shadow-of-justice-postwar-liberalism-and-the-remaking-of-political-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Katrina Forrester, <em>In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy</em>, Princeton University Press, 2019, 401pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163086.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Samuel Freeman, University of Pennsylvania</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px">I</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px">Katrina Forrester's<em> </em>book<em> </em>is an engaging history of John Rawls's intellectual development and the outpouring of work in political philosophy his ideas have engendered. She focuses on the evolution of Rawls's theory of justice and the historical conditions from which it purportedly grew in the late 1940s and early 1950s. She discusses the responses of Rawls's notable critics and reviews alternative positions by significant philosophers and political theorists of the era. These include Brian Barry, Charles Beitz, G.A. Cohen, Ronald Dworkin, Robert Goodin, H.L.A. Hart, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Susan Okin, Onora O'Neill, Derek Parfit, T.M. Scanlon, Amartya Sen, Peter Singer, Judith Shklar, Charles Taylor, Judith Thomson, Michael Walzer, Bernard Williams, and other leading figures. Forrester concisely summarizes their core... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/in-the-shadow-of-justice-postwar-liberalism-and-the-remaking-of-political-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/arendt-on-the-political/ 2020-09-25T14:00:00-0400 2020-09-25T14:41:54-0400 Arendt on the Political David Arndt <p>2020.09.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/arendt-on-the-political/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p><strong>David Arndt, <em>Arendt on the Political</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2019, 282pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108498319.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Shmuel Lederman, Weiss-Livnat Center for Holocaust Research and Education at the University of Haifa</strong></p> <div class="WordSection1" dir="RTL" style="text-align:start"> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" dir="LTR" style="margin-top:16px"><span style="page:WordSection1"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">David Arndt's book<em> </em>is an excellent exposition of Arendt's political thought. Anyone interested in Arendt would benefit from the clear presentation and analysis of the main concepts and ideas Arendt thought through in her writings; the careful distinctions he offers between the meanings Arendt gave to these concepts and the more common understanding of them; and the useful theoretical and historical background by which Arndt contextualizes Arendt's contributions to political theory. In particular, Arndt's emphasis on the importance of what he calls Arendt's "pure" concept of the political, namely the way she explored the meaning of politics as a unique human activity, distinct from any other human experience, illuminates how Arendt thought about the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/arendt-on-the-political/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/justice-migration-and-mercy/ 2020-09-25T14:00:00-0400 2020-09-25T14:39:45-0400 Justice, Migration, and Mercy Michael Blake <p>2020.09.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/justice-migration-and-mercy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial">Michael Blake, <em>Justice, Migration, and Mercy</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 266pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190879556.</span></span></span></span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Anna Stilz, Princeton University</strong></p> <div class="WordSection1" style="text-align:start"> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px"><span style="page:WordSection1"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial">In the United States, a comprehensive immigration reform bill was passed by the Senate in 2013, but eventually failed in the House. This bill was structured around a compromise -- increased border security measures were to be exchanged for immigration amnesty for undocumented migrants currently inside the US. Many centrist politicians (including those in the bipartisan "Gang of Eight" that sponsored the bill) supported both of these provisions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px"><span style="page:WordSection1"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="text-decoration-style:initial"><span style="text-decoration-color:initial">From a philosophical point of view, however, this combination of principles might seem incoherent. If undocumented migrants ought to be put on a path to citizenship, then perhaps they did nothing wrong in crossing the border... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/justice-migration-and-mercy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/being-me-being-you-adam-smith-and-empathy/ 2020-09-03T12:00:00-0400 2020-09-03T12:02:56-0400 Being Me Being You: Adam Smith and Empathy Samuel Fleischacker <p>2020.09.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/being-me-being-you-adam-smith-and-empathy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Samuel Fleischacker, <em>Being Me Being You: Adam Smith and Empathy</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2019, 216pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780226661896.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Lauren Kopajtic, Fordham University</strong></p> <div class="WordSection1" style="text-align:start"> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="page:WordSection1">Samuel Fleischacker's book<em> </em>is a very welcome addition both to scholarship on Adam Smith and to the burgeoning field of empathy studies. Fleischacker brings decades of excellent and influential work on Smith to the popular topic of empathy to show that Smithian empathy (Smith uses the term "sympathy" for this capacity), with some updates, has a crucial role to play in our ethical practices. In doing so, Fleischacker offers important responses to some perennial objections to Smith's empathy-based moral theory, and to the recent critiques of empathy from Paul Bloom and Jesse Prinz. But Fleischacker does more than just delineate and defend Smithian empathy in this book; he also makes a compelling case for an eclectic,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/being-me-being-you-adam-smith-and-empathy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/women-philosophers-of-seventeenth-century-england-selected-correspondence/ 2020-09-03T11:55:00-0400 2020-09-03T11:55:42-0400 Women Philosophers of Seventeenth-Century England: Selected Correspondence Jacqueline Broad (ed.) <p>2020.09.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/women-philosophers-of-seventeenth-century-england-selected-correspondence/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Jacqueline Broad (ed.), <em>Women Philosophers of Seventeenth-Century England: Selected Correspondence</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 279pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780190673338.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Cunning, University of Iowa</strong></p> <p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Jacqueline Broad has produced a terrific volume and an invaluable resource for scholars and students. The volume showcases a large selection of letters in which four women philosophers of the early modern period -- Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Damaris Cudworth Masham, and Elizabeth Berkeley Burnet -- exchange views with a number of their prominent philosophical, political, and scientific contemporaries. Broad provides an introduction up front that highlights some of the cross-cutting topics that arise across the letters -- topics in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, and ethics -- and then there are separate sections that contain the letters by the four women and their correspondents. The latter include Walter Charleton, Joseph Glanvill, Constantijn Huygens, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/women-philosophers-of-seventeenth-century-england-selected-correspondence/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/epistemology-after-sextus-empiricus/ 2020-09-03T11:50:00-0400 2020-09-06T22:12:55-0400 Epistemology After Sextus Empiricus Katja Maria Vogt and Justin Vlasits (eds.) <p>2020.09.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/epistemology-after-sextus-empiricus/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Katja Maria Vogt and Justin Vlasits (eds.), <em>Epistemology After Sextus Empiricus</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 335pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190946302.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Diego E. Machuca, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Pyrrhonian skepticism's influence on, or relevance to, modern and contemporary epistemology cannot, I think, be overstated. Suffice it to consider the problem of conflicting appearances, the problem of the criterion of truth, the problem of the regress of justification, the epistemic significance of disagreement, and the nature and aim of inquiry and its connection with suspension of judgment. Regarding all these topics, the extant writings of Sextus Empiricus -- our chief source for ancient Pyrrhonism -- have exerted a crucial direct or indirect impact, even though this is not always duly recognized. The twofold purpose of the volume under review is to explore "epistemology <em>after </em>Sextus, both ways in which he has influenced the history of philosophy and ways... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/epistemology-after-sextus-empiricus/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/hegels-concept-of-life-self-consciousness-freedom-logic/ 2020-09-03T11:00:00-0400 2020-09-03T11:53:01-0400 Hegel's Concept of Life: Self-Consciousness, Freedom, Logic Karen Ng <p>2020.09.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hegels-concept-of-life-self-consciousness-freedom-logic/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal"><strong>Karen Ng, <em>Hegel's Concept of Life: Self-Consciousness, Freedom, Logic</em>, Oxford University Press, 2020, 319pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190947613.</strong></span></span></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Gerad Gentry, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Lewis University</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Interest in Hegel's Idealism has surged over the past thirty years and shows no sign of slowing. It is increasingly commonplace to view Hegel's significance as more than mere esotericism in the history of philosophy and sociology. The interpretive camps defining this resurgence are multifarious, but one variation has gained particular traction. Broadly, this interpretive camp emphasizes the continuity (inherited and critical) of Hegel's system with the epistemic advances of Kant's critical idealism. Within this broad interpretive camp, and for the sake of this review, we can pick out two prominent paths. On the one hand stand works like Robert Pippin's Hegel of 1989 (including the less epistemologically-restricted variation of his 2019 Hegel), for whom Kant's original synthetic unity... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hegels-concept-of-life-self-consciousness-freedom-logic/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/reasons-in-action-a-reductionist-account-of-intentional-action/ 2020-09-03T11:00:00-0400 2020-09-03T11:54:22-0400 Reasons in Action: A Reductionist Account of Intentional Action Ingmar Persson <p>2020.09.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/reasons-in-action-a-reductionist-account-of-intentional-action/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Ingmar Persson, <em>Reasons in Action: A Reductionist Account of Intentional Action</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 171pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198845034.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Andrei A. Buckareff, Marist College</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Ingmar Persson is best known for his work in moral philosophy. Some of his publications have explored the boundary moral philosophy shares with the philosophy of action. But Persson is not someone whose name immediately comes to mind when thinking of the state of play in action theory. So it came as a bit of a surprise to me when I learned that he had published a monograph on the philosophy of action. This book is not Persson's first foray into the sub-discipline. It is based on his doctoral thesis completed in 1981. So it is a return of sorts, and the first of what I hope will be further work by Persson in the philosophy of action.</span></span></span></p> <p... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/reasons-in-action-a-reductionist-account-of-intentional-action/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/knowing-other-minds/ 2020-09-03T11:00:00-0400 2020-09-03T11:57:20-0400 Knowing Other Minds Anita Avramides and Matthew Parrott (eds.) <p>2020.09.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowing-other-minds/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Anita Avramides and Matthew Parrott (eds.), <em>Knowing Other Minds</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 238pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198794400.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Amy Kind, Claremont McKenna College</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Many of us have spent a considerable amount of 2020 working and teaching in a much more solitary environment than we're used to. Rather than conversing with one another in person, we are instead spending hours and hours staring at one another arranged in little boxes on a computer screen, listening to disembodied voices through our hastily acquired headsets, and attempting to form some kind of meaningful human connection. Yet even in these strange and difficult days of the COVID-19 era, when so much of our interaction with other people is virtual, we still take it completely for granted that this virtual interaction puts us in contact with actual other people and, correspondingly, with actual other minds. Moreover, we... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowing-other-minds/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/knowledge-and-conditionals-essays-on-the-structure-of-inquiry/ 2020-09-03T11:00:00-0400 2020-09-03T11:59:46-0400 Knowledge and Conditionals: Essays on the Structure of Inquiry Robert C. Stalnaker <p>2020.09.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-and-conditionals-essays-on-the-structure-of-inquiry/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Robert C. Stalnaker, <em>Knowledge and Conditionals: Essays on the Structure of Inquiry</em>, Oxford University Press, 2019, 252pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198810346.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Fabrizio Cariani, University of Maryland, College Park</strong></p> <div class="WordSection1" style="text-align:start"> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:13px"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="font-variant-ligatures:normal">The book is a collection of thirteen essays devoted to themes in formal epistemology, philosophy of language, metaphysics and logic. Robert C. Stalnaker advertises it as a spiritual successor to his 1984 classic <em>Inquiry</em>. Indeed, the book<em> </em>is like <em>Inquiry</em> in two important respects. For one obvious thing, it follows a similar structural arc. Much as <em>Inquiry</em>'s first half is devoted to the concept of belief, the first half of<em> </em>the book<em> </em>develops a constellation of views on the nature of knowledge and on its relation to belief and credence. The shift of focus from belief to knowledge is an explicit nod to the knowledge-first program associated with Timothy Williamson's work. The second half is dedicated to -- you guessed it -- conditionals, as well... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-and-conditionals-essays-on-the-structure-of-inquiry/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/philosophy-as-drama-platos-thinking-through-dialogue/ 2020-08-26T11:30:00-0400 2020-08-26T11:30:35-0400 Philosophy as Drama: Plato's Thinking through Dialogue Hallvard Fossheim, Vigdis Songe-Møller, and Knut Ågotnes (eds.) <p>2020.08.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/philosophy-as-drama-platos-thinking-through-dialogue/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:13px; margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="break-after:avoid-page"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Hallvard Fossheim, Vigdis Songe-Møller, and Knut Ågotnes (eds.), <em>Philosophy as Drama: Plato's Thinking through Dialogue</em>, Bloomsbury, 2019, 247pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350082496.</span></span></strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brooks A. Sommerville, University of British Columbia</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-top:16px; text-align:start"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="white-space:normal">Roughly sixty years ago, certain interpreters dragged the study of Plato's dialogues into the modern world by subjecting them to analytic philosophical methods. So goes the prevailing history of Plato scholarship. With this development, specialists could explain their research to their colleagues using familiar modern categories, and -- what is perhaps just another way of saying the same thing -- it conferred modern respectability on a set of texts whose place in philosophical research had come into question. Unfortunately for the study of Plato, the story does not end there. This newfound respectability came at a cost, for it did not fall equally on every Stephanus page. While scholars readily saw how they could apply modern techniques to the crisp,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/philosophy-as-drama-platos-thinking-through-dialogue/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-precipice-existential-risk-and-the-future-of-humanity/ 2020-08-19T12:00:00-0400 2020-08-19T12:36:51-0400 The Precipice: Existential Risk and the Future of Humanity Toby Ord <p>2020.08.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-precipice-existential-risk-and-the-future-of-humanity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p><strong>Toby Ord, <em>The Precipice: Existential Risk and the Future of Humanity</em>, Hachette, 2020, 480pp., $18.99 (pbk), ISBN 9780316484923.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Theron Pummer, University of St Andrews</strong></p> <p>In this timely book, Toby Ord argues that there is a one in six chance that humanity will suffer an existential catastrophe within the next 100 years, and that minimizing this risk should be a major global priority. We live in an age of heightened existential risk, due to such powerful technologies as nuclear weapons, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Ord calls this age "the Precipice." It is an unsustainable time: humanity cannot carry on playing Russian roulette. Unless we soon achieve a much higher level of existential safety, we will destroy ourselves.</p> <p>The book offers an engaging and empirically-grounded synoptic view of humanity's past, present, and future, and of the risks threatening to cause that future to be far worse than it could be. Do... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-precipice-existential-risk-and-the-future-of-humanity/" >Read More</a> </p>