tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2018-10-14T19:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/on-the-soul-and-other-psychological-works/ 2018-10-14T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-14T19:00:00-0400 On the Soul and Other Psychological Works Aristotle <p>2018.10.13 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/on-the-soul-and-other-psychological-works/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Aristotle<em>, On the Soul and Other Psychological Works</em>, Fred D. Miller, Jr. (tr.), Oxford University Press, 2018, lxxiv + 276pp., $14.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199588213.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jason W. Carter, Exeter College, University of Oxford</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Fred D. Miller, Jr.'s stated goal for his new translation for the Oxford World's Classics series is, 'to provide a clear and accessible translation of Aristotle's psychological works while . . . conveying something of his distinctive style'. Not only does Miller achieve these goals in spades, but he also provides something more. His translation of Aristotle's <em>De Anima</em> and <em>Parva Naturalia </em>(the 'short works concerning nature'), along with twenty-three selected fragments from Aristotle's lost works and his 'Hymn to Hermias', is elegant, philosophically sensitive, and informed by some of the best recent scholarly work on Aristotle's psychology and biology (including his own: see Miller 1999; 2000; 2012).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Miller's new translation contains everything a reader... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/on-the-soul-and-other-psychological-works/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/new-methuselahs-the-ethics-of-life-extension/ 2018-10-11T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-11T19:00:00-0400 New Methuselahs: The Ethics of Life Extension John K. Davis <p>2018.10.12 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/new-methuselahs-the-ethics-of-life-extension/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John K. Davis, <em>New Methuselahs: The Ethics of Life Extension,</em> MIT Press, 2018, 354pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262038133.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Nicholas Agar, University of Wellington</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">John K. Davis advances a bold claim about human life extension. He argues that we should expeditiously develop and make available technologies that will radically extend human lifespans. An interesting novelty is the book's final chapter in which Davis presents policies that he thinks will speed the arrival of these technologies. Davis's approach to a future made by radical life extension is generally optimistic. He notes, but downplays, possible bad societal consequences and is bullish about a "wiser, more mature, less superficial, less violent, more informed, better educated, and more responsible" collective future that could result from accelerating the arrival of radically extended lifespans. (p. 30) I think that we should be cautious about these optimistic forecasts. We should remember... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/new-methuselahs-the-ethics-of-life-extension/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/platos-persona-marsilo-ficino-renaissance-humanism-and-platonic-traditions/ 2018-10-10T21:00:00-0400 2018-10-11T13:59:57-0400 Plato's Persona: Marsilio Ficino, Renaissance Humanism, and Platonic Traditions Denis J.-J. Robichaud <p>2018.10.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/platos-persona-marsilo-ficino-renaissance-humanism-and-platonic-traditions/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Denis J.-J. Robichaud, <em>Plato'</em><em>s Persona: Marsilio Ficino, Renaissance Humanism, and Platonic Traditions</em>, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018, 344pp., $79.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780812249859.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Anna Corrias, University of Queensland</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Denis J.-J. Robichaud's comprehensive study of Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499)'s engagement with Platonic philosophy is an impressive scholarly work which makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the changes and transformations, as well as of the philosophical continuity, which characterize the Platonic tradition.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The concept of 'persona', around which this study is constructed, has a long tradition in the history of Western thought, and is fundamental not only to define what we understand today as the philosophical identity of an author, but also -- and even the more so -- to comprehend how this identity changed through time. For in most cases, the affection of disciples and the admiration of readers, together with different translation... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/platos-persona-marsilo-ficino-renaissance-humanism-and-platonic-traditions/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/belief-a-pragmatic-picture/ 2018-10-10T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-10T19:00:00-0400 Belief: A Pragmatic Picture Aaron Z. Zimmerman <p>2018.10.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/belief-a-pragmatic-picture/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Aaron Z. Zimmerman, <em>Belief: A Pragmatic Picture</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 179pp., $46.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198809517.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Trevor Pearce, University of North Carolina at Charlotte</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">1859 was a banner year for philosophy and science, with the publication of Darwin's <em>On the Origin of Species</em>, Marx's <em>Zur Kritik der politischen Oekonomie</em>, and Mill's <em>On Liberty</em>. But few recall another book that appeared that same year, Alexander Bain's <em>The Emotions and the Will</em>, even though Mill himself saw it "as marking the most advanced point which the <em>à posteriori </em>psychology has reached."<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> Outside the history of psychology and positivism, Bain is primarily remembered for a single claim made in this book: "action is the basis, and ultimate criterion, of belief." As he argued in its penultimate chapter,</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">the primordial form of belief is expectation of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/belief-a-pragmatic-picture/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/niels-bohr-and-the-philosophy-of-physics-twenty-first-century-perspectives/ 2018-10-09T21:00:00-0400 2018-10-09T21:00:00-0400 Niels Bohr and the Philosophy of Physics: Twenty-First-Century Perspectives Jan Faye and Henry J. Folse (eds.) <p>2018.10.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/niels-bohr-and-the-philosophy-of-physics-twenty-first-century-perspectives/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jan Faye and Henry J. Folse (eds.), <em>Niels Bohr and the Philosophy of Physics: Twenty-First-Century Perspectives</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 384pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350035126.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brian Hepburn, Wichita State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a handsome, well-edited, fascinating volume with a subject that is remarkable in at least two ways. Firstly, it is striking that now, even after a century, there should be so much to say about Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics (or interpretations, as might be the lesson of this book). This is especially remarkable given that there was already the centenary volume of Bohr's birth (which was 1885, though the volume, also edited by Jan Faye and Henry J. Folse, came out in 1994). In their introduction, the editors seem to characterize this as a sequel to the 1994 collection. It is a testament to the richness of Bohr's thought and the thoroughness of Bohr scholarship that this volume... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/niels-bohr-and-the-philosophy-of-physics-twenty-first-century-perspectives/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-opinion-of-mankind-sociability-and-the-theory-of-the-state-from-hobbes-to-smith/ 2018-10-09T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-09T19:00:00-0400 The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the Theory of the State from Hobbes to Smith Paul Sagar <p>2018.10.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-opinion-of-mankind-sociability-and-the-theory-of-the-state-from-hobbes-to-smith/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Paul Sagar, <em>The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the Theory of the State from Hobbes to Smith</em>, Princeton University Press, 2018, 248pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691178882.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Christel Fricke, University of Oslo</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The book covers a period in the history of political theory that has for a long time attracted a great deal of scholarly attention. It is thus not surprising that much of what the author has to say on the political theories of Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville, Rousseau, Hume, Smith, and Kant and some comparatively minor thinkers sounds familiar to the reader who has read this material. However, the author advances a new claim: He argues that Hume's political thought represents a substantial shift from a Hobbesian understanding of government as sovereignty (shared by Locke, Mandeville, Rousseau, and Kant) to an account of government without sovereignty. While Adam Smith followed Hume, the Hobbesian understanding of government has been dominating political theory... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-opinion-of-mankind-sociability-and-the-theory-of-the-state-from-hobbes-to-smith/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/consciousness-and-the-philosophy-of-signs-how-peircean-semiotics-combines-phenomenal-qualia-and-practical-effects/ 2018-10-08T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-09T10:26:42-0400 Consciousness and the Philosophy of Signs: How Peircean Semiotics Combines Phenomenal Qualia and Practical Effects ​Marc Champagne <p>2018.10.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/consciousness-and-the-philosophy-of-signs-how-peircean-semiotics-combines-phenomenal-qualia-and-practical-effects/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">​Marc Champagne, <em>Consciousness and the Philosophy of Signs: </em><em>How Peircean Semiotics Combines Phenomenal Qualia and Practical Effects</em>, Springer, 2018, 127pp., $89.99 (hbk), ISBN 9783319733371.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Vincent M. Colapietro, Pennsylvania State University/University of Rhode Island</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In a compact monograph, Marc Champagne makes large claims and indeed undertakes what might seem to some readers a Herculean task--to solve the "hard problem", as the problem of <em>qualia </em>has come to be identified in the philosophy of mind. In order to explain both phenomenal qualities and practical effects, Thomas Nagel suggests we need to respond creatively to the challenge of forming new concepts and devising a new method.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> He identifies this with "an objective phenomenology not dependent on empathy or imagination." Moreover, Nagel assumes that such a resource, "if it exists, lies in the distant future" (quoted by Champagne). In contrast, Champagne judges it to be already present in the past, for "the materials... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/consciousness-and-the-philosophy-of-signs-how-peircean-semiotics-combines-phenomenal-qualia-and-practical-effects/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/to-the-best-of-our-knowledge-social-expectations-and-epistemic-normativity/ 2018-10-07T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-08T22:08:27-0400 To the Best of Our Knowledge: Social Expectations and Epistemic Normativity Sanford C. Goldberg <p>2018.10.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/to-the-best-of-our-knowledge-social-expectations-and-epistemic-normativity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Sanford C. Goldberg, <em>To the Best of Our Knowledge: Social Expectations and Epistemic Normativity</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 277pp. $46.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198793670.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Allan Hazlett, Washington University in St. Louis</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Suppose that you are riding the bus on the way to buy some tortilla chips. You will have to choose between an expensive bag of organic chips or a cheap bag of non-organic chips. Whatever chips you buy will be consumed by your darling daughter, but any money you save will go to her college fund. You suspect, and are inclined to believe, that non-organic foods are unhealthy. You also know that you could find out whether there is any scientific evidence that non-organic foods are unhealthy, and you could do it right now, because your phone is right here. But your phone also has on it a funny game where you pop soap bubbles with a swordfish, the playing... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/to-the-best-of-our-knowledge-social-expectations-and-epistemic-normativity/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/kierkegaard-and-religion-personality-character-and-virtue/ 2018-10-04T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-04T19:00:00-0400 Kierkegaard and Religion: Personality, Character, and Virtue Sylvia Walsh <p>2018.10.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kierkegaard-and-religion-personality-character-and-virtue/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Sylvia Walsh, <em>Kierkegaard and Religion: Personality, Character, and Virtue</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 245pp., $92.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107180581.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jeffrey Hanson, Human Flourishing Program at Harvard University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Sylvia Walsh's newest book addresses a constellation of issues that are arrayed around the influence of Kierkegaard's religious conceptuality on his view of how personality, character, and virtue are shaped. The topics included under this capacious heading end up ranging widely, both across theme and the chronology of Kierkegaard's authorship. Walsh announces early in her Prologue that</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">No thinker has reflected more deeply on the role of religion in forming the human self than the Danish religious poet Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), who produced in little more than a decade an astonishing number of works devoted to an analysis of the kind of personality, character, and spiritual qualities needed to become an authentic human being or... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kierkegaard-and-religion-personality-character-and-virtue/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/knowledge-belief-and-god-new-insights-in-religious-epistemology/ 2018-10-03T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-03T19:00:00-0400 Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne, and Dani Rabinowitz (eds.) <p>2018.10.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-belief-and-god-new-insights-in-religious-epistemology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Matthew A. Benton, John Hawthorne, and Dani Rabinowitz (eds.), <em>Knowledge, Belief, and God: New Insights in Religious Epistemology</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 345pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198798705.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by T. Ryan Byerly, University of Sheffield</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">This collection of sixteen new essays in religious epistemology is among the central outputs of the three-year research project <em>New Insights and Directions in Religious Epistemology</em>. In this review, I begin with some comments about the collection as a whole, then briefly identify some of the key insights contained within thirteen of the chapters, before focusing in more detail on the remaining three chapters which, in my judgment, are among the best candidates for identifying fruitful new directions for research in religious epistemology.</span></strong></p> <p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-weight:normal">The editors describe mainstream epistemology as a field that "has enjoyed a fertile period of intense theorizing" in which topics of perennial interest to epistemologists "have... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-belief-and-god-new-insights-in-religious-epistemology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/truth-and-the-world-an-explanationist-theory/ 2018-10-02T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-02T19:00:00-0400 Truth and the World: An Explanationist Theory Jonathan Tallant <p>2018.10.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/truth-and-the-world-an-explanationist-theory/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="border:none; margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jonathan Tallant, <em>Truth and the World: An Explanationist Theory</em>, Routledge, 2018, 240pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138309777.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mark Jago, University of Nottingham</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="border:none; margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Explaining truth is one of the tasks of philosophy, up there on the to-do list along with explaining morality, existence, and consciousness. Grand theories have been constructed, in an attempt to connect truth to the world. Truth <em>depends</em> on the world. Truth is <em>correspondence </em>with the facts. Truths have <em>truthmakers</em>, in virtue of whose existence they are true. Whatever the full story, it's going to be difficult, complex metaphysical stuff. Or so we've been led to believe. Jonathan Tallant challenges this view. He rejects truthmaker theory (as do many). In its place, he puts forward an 'explanationist' theory, on which each truth gets explained without recourse to truthmakers (or corresponding facts, or whatever).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="border:none; margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in;... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/truth-and-the-world-an-explanationist-theory/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/what-a-philosopher-is-becoming-nietzsche/ 2018-10-01T21:00:00-0400 2018-10-01T21:00:00-0400 What a Philosopher Is: Becoming Nietzsche Laurence Lampert <p>2018.10.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/what-a-philosopher-is-becoming-nietzsche/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Laurence Lampert, <em>What a Philosopher Is: Becoming Nietzsche</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 349pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226488110.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Joel E. Mann, St. Norbert College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Laurence Lampert's ambition is to trace the arc of Nietzsche's becoming Nietzsche. This might appear yet another stab at literary biography, but, since Nietzsche considered himself (among other things) a philosopher, it cannot be reduced to such. That is, what Nietzsche thought a <em>philosopher ought to be</em>, which is inseparable from the question of what <em>philosophy is</em>, matters. How a great philosopher understood his task is of the utmost historical importance, surely, but it is also of import for the business of philosophy itself, since philosophers themselves wear their own methodological self-awareness as a badge of honor.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">All of the above is perhaps especially true in Nietzsche's case, as scholars and enthusiasts will be well... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/what-a-philosopher-is-becoming-nietzsche/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/justice-and-the-meritocratic-state/ 2018-10-01T19:00:00-0400 2018-10-01T19:00:00-0400 Justice and the Meritocratic State Thomas Mulligan <p>2018.10.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/justice-and-the-meritocratic-state/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Thomas Mulligan, <em>Justice and the Meritocratic State</em>, Routledge, 2018, 225pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138283800.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Peter Dietsch, Université de Montréal</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">At the core of Thomas Mulligan's theory of justice lies the idea that one deserves social advantages -- jobs and income in particular -- on the basis of one's merits. These merits depend on context, and thus the perfectionism of Mulligan's theory is formal rather than substantive: "meritocracy remains <em>agnostic</em> about what is good and instead establishes a framework under which the good -- <em>no matter what it be</em> -- can best be pursued." (p.37) The only obvious constraints that Mulligan puts on this framework are the aboutness and fitness principles: I only deserve something if the desert basis is <em>about</em> me in the relevant sense, for instance if <em>I</em> wrote this essay rather than copying it from a friend;... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/justice-and-the-meritocratic-state/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/sellars-and-contemporary-philosophy/ 2018-09-30T19:00:00-0400 2018-09-30T19:00:00-0400 Sellars and Contemporary Philosophy David Pereplyotchik and Deborah R. Barnbaum (eds.) <p>2018.09.32 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/sellars-and-contemporary-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">David Pereplyotchik and Deborah R. Barnbaum (eds.), <em>Sellars and Contemporary Philosophy</em>, Routledge, 2017, 263pp., $150.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138670624.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Ray Brassier, American University of Beirut</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">David Pereplyotchik and Deborah Barnbaum's collection devoted to Sellars is the fourth to appear since 2016 (an indication that Sellars has more readers now than during his lifetime).<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> It is an outstanding collection that perfectly encapsulates what is at stake in Sellars' contemporary resurgence. None of its contributors are content with exegesis: each uses Sellars to intervene in ongoing debates about the nature of mind, meaning, knowledge, and action, as well as the relation between appearance and reality. Its uniform excellence is due not only to the quality of its content but also to the fact that it has been superbly edited. Each chapter marshals its arguments with exemplary economy; claims and counter-­‐claims... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/sellars-and-contemporary-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-limitations-of-the-open-mind-2/ 2018-09-27T21:00:00-0400 2018-09-27T21:00:00-0400 The Limitations of the Open Mind Jeremy Fantl <p>2018.09.31 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-limitations-of-the-open-mind-2/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Jeremy Fantl, <em>The Limitations of the Open Mind</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 229pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN </span><span style="background:white">9780198807957.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jonathan Matheson, University of North Florida</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-weight:normal">This book is a provocative and timely piece of philosophy that engages a host of debates in epistemology, argumentative theory, and ethics. The book has two parts, one primarily epistemological and one broadly ethical. In the first, Jeremy Fantl examines the concepts of open-mindedness and close-mindedness, and argues that individuals can retain knowledge even when confronted with counterarguments that they spend significant time with, find compelling, and with which they are unable to expose any flaw. In the book's second half, Fantl examines the moral and political consequences of this epistemological conclusion. If one can retain knowledge in such situations, he argues, then one shouldn't engage with such counterarguments -- either open-mindedly or close-mindedly. One shouldn't engage open-mindedly,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-limitations-of-the-open-mind-2/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-aftermath-of-syllogism-aristotelian-logical-argument-from-avicenna-to-hegel/ 2018-09-27T19:00:00-0400 2018-09-27T19:00:00-0400 The Aftermath of Syllogism: Aristotelian Logical Argument from Avicenna to Hegel Marco Sgarbi and Matteo Cosci (eds.) <p>2018.09.30 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-aftermath-of-syllogism-aristotelian-logical-argument-from-avicenna-to-hegel/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Marco Sgarbi and Matteo Cosci (eds.), <em>The Aftermath of Syllogism: Aristotelian Logical Argument from Avicenna to Hegel</em>, Bloomsbury, 2018, 220pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350043527.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Henrik Lagerlund, Stockholm University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The theory of syllogisms has a remarkable history. For over two millennia it was the core of logical theory. It was only in the late 19<sup>th</sup> century, when Frege's revolution and the mathematization of logic began, that syllogistics was eventually replaced, although it took even longer before it stopped being taught at schools and universities (that is, as not just a piece of history). In some universities, it is still taught, as the very first introduction to logic, to help students grasp what a deduction is or what a piece of valid reasoning might look like. I cannot think of any other theory has been this influential.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">We know quite a bit about its history,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-aftermath-of-syllogism-aristotelian-logical-argument-from-avicenna-to-hegel/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/truth-in-fiction-rethinking-its-logic/ 2018-09-26T19:00:00-0400 2018-09-26T19:00:00-0400 Truth in Fiction: Rethinking its Logic John Woods <p>2018.09.29 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/truth-in-fiction-rethinking-its-logic/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John Woods, <em>Truth in Fiction: Rethinking its Logic</em><span style="font-variant:small-caps">, </span>Springer, 2018, 239pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9783319726571.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Manuel García-Carpintero, University of Barcelona</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In this book, John Woods comes back to issues he addressed in his groundbreaking <em>The Logic of Fiction </em>(1975), from a novel "naturalist" perspective. The main problem the book confronts is "fiction's (alleged) systemic and untroubling inconsistency" (188). This supposed inconsistency is established "by a large body of empirically discernible data of material relevance to the facts of lived literary experience of its readers and writers" (189), which makes manifest to "Everyone who has ever thought about the stories people read . . . that what they read is true in the stories and false in the world" (191). These crisp formulations come from the final pages, but the book is peppered with similar claims. The reader might object that... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/truth-in-fiction-rethinking-its-logic/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/subhuman-the-moral-psychology-of-human-attitudes-to-animals/ 2018-09-25T21:00:00-0400 2018-09-25T21:00:00-0400 Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes to Animals T.J. Kasperbauer <p>2018.09.28 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/subhuman-the-moral-psychology-of-human-attitudes-to-animals/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">T.J. Kasperbauer, <em>Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes to Animals</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 233pp., $34.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190695811.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by John Basl, Northeastern University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">If you regularly teach or otherwise discuss issues of animal ethics, consider whether this experience is familiar to you: You spend time in class carefully discussing various arguments for the conclusion that our treatment of non-human animals in factory farms or other conditions are incommensurate with the moral status of such animals. You work to ensure that students understand the views and show them that many of their simple objections are inadequate. Several, perhaps many, of your students are familiar, in some way, with some of the empirical facts regarding these practices. Several, in my experience more and more over time, are already vegetarian or vegan, and some of them cite ethical considerations as the reasons for their practice. At... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/subhuman-the-moral-psychology-of-human-attitudes-to-animals/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/mexican-philosophy-in-the-20th-century-essential-readings/ 2018-09-25T19:00:00-0400 2018-09-25T19:00:00-0400 Mexican Philosophy in the 20th Century: Essential Readings Carlos Alberto Sánchez and Robert Eli Sanchez, Jr. (eds.) <p>2018.09.27 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/mexican-philosophy-in-the-20th-century-essential-readings/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Carlos Alberto Sánchez and Robert Eli Sanchez, Jr. (eds.), <em>Mexican Philosophy in the 20th Century: Essential Readings</em>, Oxford, 2017, 270pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190601300.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Manuel Vargas, University of California, San Diego</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a landmark volume, one that makes available a cluster of interrelated and historically important texts that have mostly been unavailable in English. It is an anthology of philosophical work published in Mexico between 1910 and 1960. There are nineteen chapters, an introduction that provides some context and motivation for the volume, and biographical information about each of the authors. The book enables the teaching of courses that focus on issues in 20<sup>th</sup> century Mexican philosophy, and it constitutes a considerable expansion of English-language translations of work in Latin American philosophy more generally. It is a tremendous resource for researchers, as well as those looking to diversify syllabi.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Prior to this volume, the situation... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/mexican-philosophy-in-the-20th-century-essential-readings/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/no-morality-no-self-anscombes-radical-skepticism/ 2018-09-24T21:00:00-0400 2018-09-24T21:00:00-0400 No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism James Doyle <p>2018.09.26 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/no-morality-no-self-anscombes-radical-skepticism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><strong><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">James Doyle, <em>No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism</em>, Harvard University Press, 2018, 238pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN </span></strong><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">9780674976504.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jennifer A. Frey, University of South Carolina</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In the 20<sup>th</sup> century, Elizabeth Anscombe was one of the most influential women working within the analytic philosophical tradition. But, according to James Doyle we have failed to understand her most significant contributions, and, as a result, have failed to take the full measure of her continued relevance and value. In particular, Doyle argues in his book<strong><span style="font-weight:normal"> that</span></strong> we have not fully reckoned with her two most radical theses: (1) that there is no sense whatsoever to be made of a distinctively <em>moral</em> use of ought, duty, or obligation, and (2) that ‘I’ is not a referring term. Although I take issue with Doyle’s claim that Anscombe is a radical skeptic — either about morality or the self —... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/no-morality-no-self-anscombes-radical-skepticism/" >Read More</a> </p>