tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2018-06-18T19:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/art-and-authority-moral-rights-and-meaning-in-contemporary-visual-art/ 2018-06-18T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-18T19:00:00-0400 Art and Authority: Moral Rights and Meaning in Contemporary Visual Art K. E. Gover <p>2018.06.19 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/art-and-authority-moral-rights-and-meaning-in-contemporary-visual-art/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">K. E. Gover, <em>Art and Authority: Moral Rights and Meaning in Contemporary Visual Art</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 224 pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198768692.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Iskra Fileva, University of Colorado, Boulder</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">We sometimes say or do things that we do not endorse upon reflection: "I was having a bad day and lost my temper", or, "I was too tired to think clearly." The importance of this point is widely recognized in ethics, though what precisely we should make of it is a matter of ongoing debate. Can we hold people accountable for deeds they renounce or do not identify with? And if a person feels alienated from an action, can <em>we </em>nonetheless identify her with that action?</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Interestingly, there has been little or no discussion of the importance of second-order endorsement in the process of art-making. Much as we may say or do things that we... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/art-and-authority-moral-rights-and-meaning-in-contemporary-visual-art/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/genuine-pretending-on-the-philosophy-of-the-zhuangzi/ 2018-06-17T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-17T21:00:00-0400 Genuine Pretending: On the Philosophy of the Zhuangzi Hans-Georg Moeller and Paul J. D'Ambrosio <p>2018.06.18 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/genuine-pretending-on-the-philosophy-of-the-zhuangzi/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Hans-Georg Moeller and Paul J. D'Ambrosio, <em>Genuine Pretending: On the Philosophy of the Zhuangzi</em>, Columbia University Press, 2017, 221 pp., $35.00, ISBN 9780231183994.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Susan Blake, Bard College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="background:white">"A romp through 'the vast wilds of open nowhere'" -- Roger Ebert </span><br> "Better than any existing work on humor" -- Aristotle<br> <span style="background:white">"Nothing more than a success" -- Guy Smiley</span><br> "A demonstration of nothing . . . in a technical sense" -- Ford Prefect<br> "A tour de force through the 'homeland of non-even-anything'" -- Steven Colbert</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This book presents a novel reading of the <em>Zhuangzi</em> that illuminates its humor and presents it as responding to philosophical concerns of its day. To the extent that these philosophical concerns are also those of the present day -- the search for a sane and healthy response to the impossible demands of sincerity -- we can, through... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/genuine-pretending-on-the-philosophy-of-the-zhuangzi/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/idealism-new-essays-in-metaphysics/ 2018-06-17T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-17T19:00:00-0400 Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics Tyron Goldschmidt and Kenneth L. Pearce (ed.) <p>2018.06.17 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/idealism-new-essays-in-metaphysics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Tyron Goldschmidt and Kenneth L. Pearce (ed.), <em>Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 336 pp., $60.00, ISBN 9780198746973.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Adam P. Taylor, North Dakota State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The familiar narrative about the early days of analytic philosophy tells us of its triumph over the needless metaphysical excesses of its immediate forerunners, the idealists. In one form or another, idealism was the paramount philosophical view of the 19<sup>th</sup> century. Nowadays, however, the bulwarks of idealism are largely abandoned. Few defend the view, and fewer still are willing to take the time to consider its claims seriously. Materialism and dualism dominate the philosophical landscape.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The essays offered in this volume are, the editors tell us, intended to "correct the unjustified neglect of idealism by presenting a variety of arguments for and against various versions of idealism" (p. ix). In this project, the contributors succeed marvelously.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/idealism-new-essays-in-metaphysics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-legacy-of-kant-in-sellars-and-meillassoux-analytic-and-continental-kantianism/ 2018-06-14T22:00:00-0400 2018-06-14T22:00:00-0400 The Legacy of Kant in Sellars and Meillassoux: Analytic and Continental Kantianism Fabio Gironi (ed.) <p>2018.06.16 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-legacy-of-kant-in-sellars-and-meillassoux-analytic-and-continental-kantianism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Fabio Gironi (ed.), <em>The Legacy of Kant in Sellars and Meillassoux: Analytic and Continental Kantianism</em>, Routledge, 2017, 248pp., $140.00, ISBN 9781138703674.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Steven Levine, University of Massachusetts, Boston</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">A volume of essays comparing the thought of two philosophers is always worrying. Often the comparison is forced and more a product of the need to find fresh topics to publish on than of advancing genuine philosophical insight. This worry is especially acute when the two philosophers compared are as disparate and difficult as Sellars and Meillassoux. From an external point of view it is clear why they have been brought together: Ray Brassier wrote about Sellars in his book <em>Nihil Unbound</em> and in the process got many students in contemporary continental philosophy interested in this somewhat idiosyncratic analytic philosopher. Insofar as reading Sellars gives one a point of entry into a vein of analytic philosophy (the so-called Pittsburgh School)... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-legacy-of-kant-in-sellars-and-meillassoux-analytic-and-continental-kantianism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/mind-language-and-morality-essays-in-honour-of-mark-platts/ 2018-06-14T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-14T21:43:45-0400 Mind, Language and Morality: Essays in Honour of Mark Platts Gustavo Ortiz-Millán and Juan Antonio Cruz Parcero (eds.) <p>2018.06.15 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/mind-language-and-morality-essays-in-honour-of-mark-platts/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Gustavo Ortiz-Millán and Juan Antonio Cruz Parcero (eds.), <em>Mind, Language and Morality: Essays in Honour of Mark Platts, </em>Routledge, 2018, 196pp, $140.00, ISBN 9780815385028.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Samuel Guttenplan, Birkbeck College, London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This festschrift contains nine essays originally given as talks in 2012 at a conference in honour of Mark Platts, a philosopher who originally taught in Magdalen College, Oxford and Birkbeck College, London, and then emigrated to the National Autonomous University in Mexico City (UNAM) nearly forty years ago. His published work began with <em>Ways of Meaning</em> (1979), an expository treatment of the truth conditional semantic programme initially developed by Donald Davidson. Platts' <em>Ways</em> has been influential, and a second edition was published in 1997. One chapter of <em>Ways</em> set out to extend truth conditional semantics to moral language -- an extension that was then no part of Davidson's programme -- and Platts published <em>Moral Realities</em> (1991), extending this work and... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/mind-language-and-morality-essays-in-honour-of-mark-platts/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/fuzzy-logic-and-mathematics-a-historical-perspective/ 2018-06-13T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-13T19:00:00-0400 Fuzzy Logic and Mathematics: A Historical Perspective Radim Bělohlávek, Joseph W. Dauben, and George J. Klir <p>2018.06.14 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/fuzzy-logic-and-mathematics-a-historical-perspective/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Radim Bělohlávek, Joseph W. Dauben, and George J. Klir, <em>Fuzzy Logic and Mathematics: A Historical Perspective, </em>Oxford University Press, 2017, 531pp., $99.00, ISBN 9780190200015.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Christian Fermüller, Technische Universität Wien</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Fuzzy logic is a wide, some would even say a wild, topic. Some years ago, on a trip to Vietnam, I found the label "Fuzzy Logic" prominently attached to the water heater in my hotel room. I can't imagine that, say, an epistemologist or an expert in modal logic, for that matter, will ever encounter the name of her research field attached to basic equipment of daily life. I mention this only to emphasize that any book about fuzzy logic, addressed to a general audience, has to face a wide range expectations, possibly also preconceptions in view of the controversies that accompanied the topic since its initiation by Lotfi A. Zadeh in the 1960s. The title of this book might... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/fuzzy-logic-and-mathematics-a-historical-perspective/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-bloomsbury-research-handbook-of-contemporary-japanese-philosophy/ 2018-06-12T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-12T21:00:00-0400 The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy Michiko Yusa, (ed.) <p>2018.06.13 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-bloomsbury-research-handbook-of-contemporary-japanese-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Michiko Yusa, (ed.), <em>The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 391pp., $158.40, ISBN 9781474232692.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by John A. Tucker, East Carolina University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book is a valuable contribution to the rapidly growing field of Japanese philosophy. A nicely produced anthology, it includes a thoughtful introduction by the editor, Michiko Yusa, fourteen erudite essays subdivided into five sections, plus a convenient summary of the essays, notes on the contributors, an account of abbreviations and conventions, an appendix including two essays by Nishida Kitarō, a timeline with dates for the thinkers discussed, an index of Japanese texts cited, and a more traditional index, including kanji, of names and terms mentioned in the anthology. Overall, the scholarly apparatuses included make this volume an extraordinarily well-organized and helpful resource for those conducting scholarly explorations of Japanese philosophy.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Michiko Yusa's introduction contextualizes... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-bloomsbury-research-handbook-of-contemporary-japanese-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/plato-on-the-value-of-philosophy-the-art-of-argument-in-the-gorgias-and-phaedrus/ 2018-06-12T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-12T19:00:00-0400 Plato on the Value of Philosophy: the Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus Tushar Irani <p>2018.06.12 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/plato-on-the-value-of-philosophy-the-art-of-argument-in-the-gorgias-and-phaedrus/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Tushar Irani, <em>Plato on the Value of Philosophy: the Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 201 pp., $99.99, ISBN 9781107181984.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, University of Cambridge</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The central contention of this book is that the way in which we approach argument, for Plato, reveals something about our desires and motivations, particularly with respect to others (p. 3), and so the key to engaging in argument correctly is found in an understanding of the human soul (p. 4). "This book is the first to argue that what the traditional pursuit of rhetoric lacks for Plato is a comprehensive understanding of the human soul and its characteristic good" (p. 4). The <em>Phaedrus</em> makes it explicit that rhetoric needs an understanding of the soul (270c), but the real contribution of this enjoyable and readable book lies in the detailed arguments for this view, and the way in which it... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/plato-on-the-value-of-philosophy-the-art-of-argument-in-the-gorgias-and-phaedrus/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/primitive-colors-a-case-study-in-neo-pragmatist-metaphysics-and-philosophy-of-perception/ 2018-06-11T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-11T19:00:00-0400 Primitive Colors: A Case Study in Neo-pragmatist Metaphysics and Philosophy of Perception Joshua Gert <p>2018.06.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/primitive-colors-a-case-study-in-neo-pragmatist-metaphysics-and-philosophy-of-perception/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="tab-stops:.5in"><strong>Joshua Gert, <em>Primitive Colors: A Case Study in Neo-pragmatist Metaphysics and Philosophy of Perception</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 237 pp., $60.00, ISBN </strong><strong><span style="background:white">9780198785910.</span></strong></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"> </p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Pär Sundström, Umeå University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Some think colours are properties of cucumbers and tomatoes. Others that they are properties of sense-data or visual experiences. Yet others think that colours are like the property of ruling by divine right: they are properties nothing has despite some beliefs to the contrary.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">One thing that nearly everyone agrees on in this debate is that something has a <em>determinable</em> colour, like red, blue or green, if and only if it has a <em>determinate</em> colour, i.e., a specific <em>shade</em> of red, blue and green. A centre-piece of this book is a rejection of that agreement. According to Gert, determinable colours, which he prefers to call "rough colours" or "objective colours", are properties of objects in... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/primitive-colors-a-case-study-in-neo-pragmatist-metaphysics-and-philosophy-of-perception/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/berkeleys-three-dialogues-new-essays/ 2018-06-10T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-10T21:00:00-0400 Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays Stefan Storrie (ed.) <p>2018.06.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/berkeleys-three-dialogues-new-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Stefan Storrie (ed.), <em>Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 217 pp., $50.00 ISBN 9780198755685.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Marc A. Hight, Hampden-Sydney College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">George Berkeley arguably has risen in the ranks of early modern philosophers in terms of philosophical esteem. A good deal of scholarly work on the Irish philosopher has emerged since the turn of the century, taking Berkeley's thought seriously or at least seriously enough to engage carefully. Stefan Storrie's anthology dedicated to the <em>Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous</em> comes from papers delivered at a conference in 2014 celebrating the 300<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the work's publication in 1713. All of the papers have an analytical approach to a variety of philosophical and textual issues that arise in Berkeley's work.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The editor's introductory chapter is primarily an essay in apologetics: given that A.A. Luce and T.E.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/berkeleys-three-dialogues-new-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/beyond-concepts-unicepts-language-and-natural-information/ 2018-06-10T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-11T08:41:44-0400 Beyond Concepts: Unicepts, Language, and Natural Information Ruth Garrett Millikan <p>2018.06.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/beyond-concepts-unicepts-language-and-natural-information/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Ruth Garrett Millikan, <em>Beyond Concepts: Unicepts, Language, and Natural Information</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 256 pp., $35.00, ISBN 9780198717195.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Andrea Onofri, University of Graz</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In her previous work, Ruth Millikan has developed a highly influential and original account of cognition and language, applying contemporary evolutionary theory to a number of traditional philosophical problems. Her new book<em> </em>is based on the same methodological approach, addressing Kant's question "how is knowledge possible? . . . from a contemporary naturalist standpoint" (p. 3). Part One applies this perspective to the problem of cognition, while Part Two develops an account of information and of how cognitive systems extract such information from natural and intentional signs.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This book<em> </em>is a great philosophical achievement. The breadth and originality of Millikan's view are remarkable. She shows how a naturalistic approach can provide a fresh perspective on... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/beyond-concepts-unicepts-language-and-natural-information/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/how-colours-matter-to-philosophy/ 2018-06-07T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-07T21:00:00-0400 How Colours Matter to Philosophy Marcos Silva (ed.) <p>2018.06.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-colours-matter-to-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Marcos Silva (ed.), <em>How Colours Matter to Philosophy</em>, Springer, 2017, 317pp., $139.99, ISBN 9783319673974.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Dimitria Electra Gatzia, The University of Akron</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This volume is ambitious with respect to both number of contributions and scope: there are 18 papers, which cover a wide variety of topics within metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, logic, mathematics, and aesthetics. The book has three parts: (i) history of philosophy, (ii) aesthetics and philosophy of mind, and (iii) philosophy of language and logic, although there is a nice overlap among these areas. Unlike other anthologies on colour (e.g., <em>Readings on Color</em> by Alex Byrne and David Hilbert, 1996), which survey primarily empirically based philosophy of colour and colour science, this volume is all-encompassing. Various themes extend across the analytic and continental traditions. This approach vindicates Wittgenstein's remark that the riddle of colour is stimulating and not exasperating.</p>... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-colours-matter-to-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/platos-moral-psychology/ 2018-06-07T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-07T19:55:21-0400 Plato's Moral Psychology Rachana Kamtekar <p>2018.06.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/platos-moral-psychology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Rachana Kamtekar, <em>Plato's Moral Psychology</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 231pp., $55.00, ISBN 9780198798446.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by A. W. Price, Birkbeck, University of London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Rachana Kamtekar has already won a niche for herself through a series of articles on Plato that are not only ingenious and original (as is now <em>de rigueur</em>, and often enough achieved), but also genuinely perceptive. This, her first book, pursues a seminal idea through a plurality of Platonic dialogues. An introduction helpfully highlights what is central and salient, and outlines what is to come; later résumés keep the reader on track. The result should enhance anyone's appreciation and enjoyment of these familiar yet elusive texts. (I shall spice the plainness of my summaries by some dissentient musings. These should prove that the book lacks any dormitive power, and should not be read as qualifying my appreciation of it. In... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/platos-moral-psychology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/does-god-matter-essays-on-the-axiological-consequences-of-theism/ 2018-06-06T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-06T21:00:00-0400 Does God Matter? Essays on the Axiological Consequences of Theism Klaas J. Kraay (ed.) <p>2018.06.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/does-god-matter-essays-on-the-axiological-consequences-of-theism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Klaas J. Kraay (ed.), <em>Does God Matter? Essays on the Axiological Consequences of Theism</em>, Routledge, 2018, 228 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415793513.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Johnson, Yeshiva University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">These authors are generally careful about definitions, and about side-stepping somehow the issue of the vacuous truth of counterfactuals having impossible antecedents. I have very little space, so I won't be careful about either of these things. Let's just say that <em>pro-theism</em> says that it's a good thing to have God around, <em>anti-theism</em> says it's a bad thing, and the book is mostly about which view is correct. Setting aside the completely trivial arguments, all of the more substantive and important arguments (all the arguments, I think, which might have any tendency to alarm anyone) are imperfect beings.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:8pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Erik J. Wielenberg ("The Absurdity of Life in a Christian Universe as a Reason to Prefer that God... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/does-god-matter-essays-on-the-axiological-consequences-of-theism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/kafkas-the-trial-philosophical-perspectives/ 2018-06-06T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-06T19:00:00-0400 Kafka's The Trial: Philosophical Perspectives Espen Hammer (ed.) <p>2018.06.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kafkas-the-trial-philosophical-perspectives/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Espen Hammer (ed.), <em>Kafka's </em>The Trial: <em>Philosophical Perspectives</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 312pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190461447.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Rafe McGregor, Leeds Trinity University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is the third in the Oxford Studies in Philosophy and Literature series, following Shakespeare's <em>Hamlet</em> (edited by Tzachi Zamir) and <em>Ibsen's</em> Hedda Gabler (edited by Kristin Gjesda), both published earlier this year. The anthology is edited by Espen Hammer, who has published extensively on German philosophy and the work of Theodor Adorno and of Stanley Cavell. Hammer's contribution includes the introduction as well as one of the nine essays on <em>The Trial</em>, which was first published as <em>Der Proceß</em> in 1925, a year after Kafka's death. The former introduces Kafka, the curious history of the novel, its subject and themes, the context of its admission to the canon, and its legacy for literature, philosophy, and cinema. Hammer is quick... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kafkas-the-trial-philosophical-perspectives/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-age-of-culpability-children-and-the-nature-of-criminal-responsibility/ 2018-06-05T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-05T19:00:00-0400 The Age of Culpability: Children and the Nature of Criminal Responsibility Gideon Yaffe <p>2018.06.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-age-of-culpability-children-and-the-nature-of-criminal-responsibility/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Gideon Yaffe, <em>The Age of Culpability: Children and the Nature of Criminal Responsibility</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 239 pp., $40.00, ISBN 9780198803324.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Douglas Husak, Rutgers University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Why should criminal justice systems treat those under 18 more leniently than an adult who commits the same offense? This is the question nominally addressed by Gideon Yaffe. I say he addresses this question <em>nominally</em> because his reach extends much further. Like any good philosopher, Yaffe has produced a book with ideas that are exceedingly far-reaching. Along his journey, he discourses on developmental psychology, the nature of criminal culpability, the weight of reasons, the legal status of visitors and the indigent, the nature of desert, and a whole lot more. To be sure, Yaffe is careful to connect each of these broad topics to his central question of juvenile justice. But they are fascinating in their own right; to many... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-age-of-culpability-children-and-the-nature-of-criminal-responsibility/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/systematic-atheology-atheisms-reasoning-with-theology/ 2018-06-04T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-04T21:00:00-0400 Systematic Atheology: Atheism's Reasoning with Theology John R. Shook <p>2018.06.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/systematic-atheology-atheisms-reasoning-with-theology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>John R. Shook, <em>Systematic Atheology: Atheism's Reasoning with Theology</em>, Routledge, 2018, 312 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138079984.</strong><br>  </p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Chris Tweedt, Christopher Newport University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book, "composed mainly for the edification of atheism's defenders," (p. 37) is an attempt to understand and defend atheism in an organized way. The book is divided into three sections. The first attempts to define 'atheist', 'atheology', and their relationship by tracking historical uses of the terms. The second is an extensive history of atheistic and atheological western philosophers, and the third, which occupies the last half of the book, is an attempt to systematically undermine every kind of argument for the existence of a god.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The book's primary strength is its extensive historical summary in chapters 5-6. Though not in depth and sometimes (though rarely) inaccurate, the summary would be an excellent starting... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/systematic-atheology-atheisms-reasoning-with-theology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/real-hallucinations-psychiatric-illness-intentionality-and-the-interpersonal-world/ 2018-06-03T21:00:00-0400 2018-06-03T21:00:00-0400 Real Hallucinations: Psychiatric Illness, Intentionality, and the Interpersonal World Matthew Ratcliffe <p>2018.06.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/real-hallucinations-psychiatric-illness-intentionality-and-the-interpersonal-world/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p><strong>Matthew Ratcliffe, <em>Real Hallucinations: Psychiatric Illness, Intentionality, and the Interpersonal World</em>, MIT Press, 2017, 290 pp., $40.00, ISBN </strong><strong><span style="background:white">9780262036719.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Nancy Nyquist Potter, University of Louisville</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">How can we account for the fact that some people sense or hear voices that others do not hear, or that some people experience themselves as having thoughts yet are not thinking? How can we best understand what is entailed in the concept of a minimal self? While other writers have theorized about these subjects, Ratcliffe offers a unique and rich phenomenological approach to understanding verbal hallucinations (VH) and thought insertion (TI) that makes a brilliant and significant contribution to these conundrums.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The theoretical backbone of Ratcliffe's argument uses the concept of intentionality. Intentionality is a concept in philosophy that concerns mental states such as perceiving, hoping, imagining, regretting, and so on. Ratcliffe argues that... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/real-hallucinations-psychiatric-illness-intentionality-and-the-interpersonal-world/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/aristotle-on-religion/ 2018-06-03T19:00:00-0400 2018-06-03T19:00:00-0400 Aristotle on Religion Mor Segev <p>2018.06.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aristotle-on-religion/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Mor Segev, <em>Aristotle on Religion, </em>Cambridge University Press, 2017, 192pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108415255.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Lloyd P. Gerson, University of Toronto</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In this concise and focused monograph, developed out of a Ph.D. dissertation at Princeton, Mor Segev examines Aristotle's views concerning religion both in the <em>poleis</em> of his own time and in his proposed ideal version. Part of the difficulty faced by the author, and acknowledged as such, is that the word "religion" does not correspond exactly to anything in ancient Greek. What Aristotle talks about is the bureaucratic office of <em>epimeleia</em> for <em>ta hiera</em>, approximately the "management of holy matters". Perhaps a contemporary label for such an office would be "ministry of religious affairs". This would include overseeing certain holidays, the construction and care for temples, the provision of priests, and the interface between theological doctrine, on the one hand,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aristotle-on-religion/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/voicing-dissent-the-ethics-and-epistemology-of-making-disagreement-public-2/ 2018-05-31T21:00:00-0400 2018-05-31T21:00:00-0400 Voicing Dissent: The Ethics and Epistemology of Making Disagreement Public Casey Rebecca Johnson (ed.) <p>2018.05.30 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/voicing-dissent-the-ethics-and-epistemology-of-making-disagreement-public-2/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p><strong>Casey Rebecca Johnson (ed.), <em>Voicing Dissent: The Ethics and Epistemology of Making Disagreement Public</em>, Routledge, 2018, 199 pp., $140.00, ISBN 9781138744288.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Scott Aikin, Vanderbilt University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a well-considered and lively collection of essays on the norms bearing on public disagreement. After the fall of 2016, with Brexit having passed in England and Donald Trump elected President of the United States, the question of what role protest and dissent plays in properly run public discourse became a pressing question for many academics. This book, then, is particularly timely.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The philosophically significant questions orienting the collection, reviewed in Johnson's very helpful introduction, are: what counts as a disagreement, and what norms bear on us when we discover that we disagree? Are we obligated to be publically on-record about not accepting some claim or decision when we disagree? What sense of 'public'... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/voicing-dissent-the-ethics-and-epistemology-of-making-disagreement-public-2/" >Read More</a> </p>