tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2018-08-13T21:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-philosophical-imagination-collected-essays/ 2018-08-13T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-13T21:00:00-0400 The Philosophical Imagination: Collected Essays Richard Moran <p>2018.08.18 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosophical-imagination-collected-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Richard Moran, <em>The Philosophical Imagination: Collected Essays</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 326pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190633776.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Daniel D. Hutto, University of Wollongong</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Famously, Wittgenstein recommended that the preferred greeting between fellow philosophers should be 'Take your time'. The same advice applies to anyone who picks up this excellent volume of Moran's collected essays. There is a lot to digest here -- each and every essay delves deep. Moran takes his readers on a rare journey, with plenty of eye-opening twists and turns, in his explorations of the ideas of his carefully selected set of authors and topics.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The collection is divided and organized, largely topically, into three parts. The first part contains six essays on art and aesthetics -- examining such topics as our emotional engagement with fictions, and how we should understand these vis-à-vis the paradox... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosophical-imagination-collected-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/humean-nature-how-desire-explains-action-thought-and-feeling/ 2018-08-13T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-13T19:00:00-0400 Humean Nature: How Desire Explains Action, Thought, and Feeling Neil Sinhababu <p>2018.08.17 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/humean-nature-how-desire-explains-action-thought-and-feeling/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Neil Sinhababu, <em>Humean Nature: </em><em>How Desire Explains Action, Thought, and Feeling</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 214pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198783893.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Nomy Arpaly, Brown University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Sometimes you still hear someone refer to the belief-desire view of human motivation and of acting for reasons as "The Standard Theory". The days in which the theory was "standard" are long gone, and over the years it has been repeatedly maligned to the point that it is possible to defend it in such a contrarian tone as Neil Sinhababu's. His book defends the aforementioned view and more generally the view that reason is but the slave of the passions. It is not a work in the history of philosophy and so it would probably make sense to refer to it as defending a <em>neo</em>-Humean position, though Sinhababu calls it simply "Humean", which admittedly makes for better... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/humean-nature-how-desire-explains-action-thought-and-feeling/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/medical-nihilism/ 2018-08-12T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-12T21:00:00-0400 Medical Nihilism Jacob Stegenga <p>2018.08.16 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/medical-nihilism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jacob Stegenga, <em>Medical Nihilism</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 227pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198747048.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jeremy Howick, University of Oxford</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a well-written, fascinating book that will enlighten anyone interested in the Philosophy of Medicine or the Philosophy of Science. Few philosophers -- or indeed academics -- write as clearly as Stegenga, in a way that is both rigorous and understandable to the non-specialist. Stegenga's book falls within a tradition that includes Illich's <em>Medical Nemisis</em>, [<a href="#_ENREF_1" title="Illich, 1977 #2979"><span style="text-underline:none">1</span></a>] John Ioannidis' 'Why Most Published Research Findings Are False', [<a href="#_ENREF_2" title="Ioannidis, 2005 #4245"><span style="text-underline:none">2</span></a>] and the BMJ's 'Too Much Medicine' campaign. [<a href="#_ENREF_3" title=", #18057"><span style="text-underline:none">3</span></a>] His overall thesis is based on his Bayesian 'Master Argument', namely that the prior probability of a treatment being effective is very low. To support this, he offers a sustained critique... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/medical-nihilism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/wittgenstein-lectures-cambridge-1930-1933-from-the-notes-of-g-e-moore/ 2018-08-12T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-12T19:00:00-0400 Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: From the Notes of G. E. Moore David Stern, Brian Rogers, and Gabriel Citron (eds.) <p>2018.08.15 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/wittgenstein-lectures-cambridge-1930-1933-from-the-notes-of-g-e-moore/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">David Stern, Brian Rogers, and Gabriel Citron (eds.), <em>Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: From the Notes of G. E. Moore</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2016, lxxiv + 420pp., $116.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107041165.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Thomas Baldwin, University of York</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Wittgenstein returned to Cambridge in January 1929 to work on the foundations of mathematics with F. P. Ramsey, and despite their disagreements they worked together until Ramsey's unexpected death at the start of 1930. During 1929 Wittgenstein also gave some talks and at the end of the year he was invited by the Cambridge Moral Sciences faculty to give some lectures on philosophy. At this time the faculty comprised just two Professors (G. E. Moore and W. R. Sorley) and two lecturers (W. E. Johnson and C. D. Broad); so additional lectures were very welcome. Thus began Wittgenstein's courses of lectures on philosophy at Cambridge which ran, with some interruptions, from January 1930 until May 1936.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in;... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/wittgenstein-lectures-cambridge-1930-1933-from-the-notes-of-g-e-moore/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/why-does-inequality-matter/ 2018-08-09T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-09T21:00:00-0400 Why Does Inequality Matter? T. M. Scanlon <p>2018.08.14 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/why-does-inequality-matter/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">T. M. Scanlon, <em>Why</em> <em>Does Inequality Matter?</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 170pp., $25.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198812692.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jonathan Wolff, University of Oxford</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">More than four decades of reflection on the idea of equality -- or rather inequality -- are distilled into this extremely impressive, thought-provoking, yet slim, volume. It is written in simple, jargon-free terms, originally delivered as the 2013 Oxford Uehiro Lectures. Scanlon describes his position as 'relational' and 'pluralistic', but declines to give it a name. The simplicity of the writing, and the brevity of some arguments, means it contains subtleties that might well be missed by the casual reader; such is philosophical life. But I will try to draw out the main themes.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The framing of the discussion is in terms of setting out objections to inequality, rather than providing arguments for equality. This... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/why-does-inequality-matter/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/a-yogacara-buddhist-theory-of-metaphor/ 2018-08-09T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-09T19:00:00-0400 A Yogācāra Buddhist Theory of Metaphor Roy Tzohar <p>2018.08.13 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-yogacara-buddhist-theory-of-metaphor/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Roy Tzohar, <em>A Yogācāra Buddhist Theory of Metaphor</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 296pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190664398.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Malcolm Keating, Yale-NUS College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Indian philosophy has a history of sophisticated linguistic analysis (Pāṇini's grammar being the usual example), which includes theories of reference, polysemy, ellipsis, sentential unity, figurative language, and more. Roy Tzohar's <em>A Yogācāra Buddhist Theory of Metaphor </em>is a sustained argument for attending both to the intertextual nature of Indian philosophy and to the philosophical importance of topics such as metaphor and figurative language. Tzohar's central thesis is that Sthiramati, a second- or third-century CE Indian Buddhist thinker, has a theory of metaphor ("metaphor" being Tzohar's preferred translation of the Sanskrit <em>upacāra</em>) which can be understood more broadly as a theory of meaning.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The book has three parts. In Part One, Tzohar lays out the brahminical... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-yogacara-buddhist-theory-of-metaphor/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/doing-valuable-time-the-present-the-future-and-meaningful-living/ 2018-08-08T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-08T21:00:00-0400 Doing Valuable Time: The Present, the Future, and Meaningful Living Cheshire Calhoun <p>2018.08.12 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/doing-valuable-time-the-present-the-future-and-meaningful-living/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Cheshire Calhoun, <em>Doing Valuable Time: The Present, the Future, and Meaningful Living</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 200pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190851866. </strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Valerie Tiberius, University of Minnesota</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="background:white">If you're reading this review because you urgently want to know what the meaning of life is, let me get that out of the way so that you can decide how to spend your freed up time. According to Cheshire Calhoun, living a meaningful life is a matter of "expending your life's time on ends that, in your best judgment, you take yourself to have reason to value for their own sake and thus to expend your life's time on" (46). If you're going to stop reading now, let me also, quickly and strongly, recommend expending some of your time reading Calhoun's book, because it is full of interesting puzzles, illuminating examples, and deep insights about human experience. This... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/doing-valuable-time-the-present-the-future-and-meaningful-living/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/objects-and-modalities-a-study-in-the-semantics-of-modal-logic/ 2018-08-08T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-08T19:00:00-0400 Objects and Modalities: A Study in the Semantics of Modal Logic Tero Tulenheimo <p>2018.08.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/objects-and-modalities-a-study-in-the-semantics-of-modal-logic/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Tero Tulenheimo, <em>Objects and Modalities: A Study in the Semantics of Modal Logic</em>, Springer, 2017, 208pp., $119.99 (hbk), ISBN 9783319531182.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Kohei Kishida, Dalhousie University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In this book,Tero Tulenheimo lays out a semantics of quantified modal logic, and a semantic analysis of transworld or cross-world identity of individuals in particular, that is based on Hintikka's account of individuals in modal logic. Indeed, one may say his project is to modify and implement Hintikka's semantic ideas, by reflecting upon their philosophical foundations, providing them with a fuller and detailed formalism, and demonstrating applications of this formalism to several philosophical topics, and ones surrounding intentionality in particular.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.2pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The most distinctive feature of Tulenheimo's semantics, in contrast to many semantics of quantified modal logic including the ones by Kripke and by David Lewis, is that values of variables are intensions as opposed to... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/objects-and-modalities-a-study-in-the-semantics-of-modal-logic/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/women-and-liberty-1600-1800-philosophical-essays/ 2018-08-07T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-07T21:00:00-0400 Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays Jacqueline Broad and Karen Detlefsen (eds.) <p>2018.08.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/women-and-liberty-1600-1800-philosophical-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jacqueline Broad and Karen Detlefsen (eds.), <em>Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 272pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198810261.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Nancy Kendrick, Wheaton College, Massachusetts</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This excellent collection of essays on early modern women and liberty provides richly detailed analyses of freedom from both political and metaphysical perspectives. With one exception (Martina Reuter’s essay on François Poulain de la Barre), the essays treat the works of women writers.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Before turning to the individual essays, two points are in order about the collection taken as a whole. First, the editors are to be congratulated for including biographical details of the subjects of the volume in an appendix, rather than having these details included in the individual essays. Recovery work in the history of philosophy has been going on for several decades now, and the decision not to include biographical data about... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/women-and-liberty-1600-1800-philosophical-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/sympathy-in-perception/ 2018-08-07T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-07T19:00:00-0400 Sympathy in Perception Mark Eli Kalderon <p>2018.08.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/sympathy-in-perception/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Mark Eli Kalderon, <em>Sympathy in Perception</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 230pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108419604.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Catherine Legg and Jack Reynolds, Deakin University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Mark Eli Kalderon's book boldly positions itself as a work in speculative metaphysics. Its point of departure is the familiar distinction between <em>presentational </em>and <em>representational</em> philosophies of perception. Kalderon notes that the latter has been more popular of late, as it is more amenable to "an account" explicating causal or counterfactual conditions on perception (p. x); but he wishes to rehabilitate the former, at least in part. One widely-perceived disadvantage of presentationalism has been the way that understanding perception merely as registering the presence of things might seem to leave us vulnerable to error about the nature of what is presented. Kalderon seeks to remedy this not by dealing at length with various disjunctivist positions concerning perception which may be... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/sympathy-in-perception/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/how-to-do-philosophy-with-words-reflections-on-the-searle-derrida-debate/ 2018-08-06T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-06T21:00:00-0400 How to Do Philosophy with Words: Reflections on the Searle-Derrida debate Jesús Navarro <p>2018.08.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-to-do-philosophy-with-words-reflections-on-the-searle-derrida-debate/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jesús Navarro, <em>How to Do Philosophy with Words: Reflections on the Searle-Derrida debate</em>, John Benjamins, 2017, 225pp., $158.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789027218964.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Samuel C. Wheeler III, University of Connecticut</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is the second<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> book-length discussion of a confrontation between Jacques Derrida and John Searle, which consisted of an essay by Derrida<a href="#_edn2" name="_ednref2" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[2]</span></span></a> focusing on J. L. Austin's <em>How to Do Things with Words</em>,<a href="#_edn3" name="_ednref3" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[3]</span></span></a> Searle's critique of Derrida's essay<a href="#_edn4" name="_ednref4" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[4]</span></span></a>, and Derrida's very long reply to that critique.<a href="#_edn5" name="_ednref5" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[5]</span></span></a> This encounter, which occurred roughly forty years ago, has become a kind of emblem of the divide between analytic and continental philosophy. The confrontation has been widely discussed, and is worth studying by analytic philosophers who are open to... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-to-do-philosophy-with-words-reflections-on-the-searle-derrida-debate/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-value-of-rationality/ 2018-08-06T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-06T19:00:00-0400 The Value of Rationality Ralph Wedgwood <p>2018.08.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-value-of-rationality/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="background:white">Ralph Wedgwood, </span><em><span style="border:none windowtext 1.0pt; padding:0in">The Value of Rationality</span></em><span style="background:white">, Oxford University Press, 2017, 256pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198802693.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Ali Hasan, University of Iowa</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Ralph Wedgwood’s book is the first installment of a trilogy, to be followed by <em>The Rationality of Belief</em> and <em>The Rationality of Choice</em>. It is a rich volume that offers an ambitious, general theory of rationality and its value. On Wedgwood’s view, rationality is a matter of coherence, in a broad sense that includes not only relations between beliefs or credences, but also between other sorts of mental states or mental events, e.g., between beliefs and sensory experiences. Rationality is a value. It is distinct from other sorts of values or norms at least in that it is an internal standard — rationality supervenes on what is in the mind — and a constitutive standard: “all thinkers have at least... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-value-of-rationality/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-right-of-necessity-moral-cosmopolitanism-and-global-poverty/ 2018-08-05T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-13T09:45:29-0400 The Right of Necessity: Moral Cosmopolitanism and Global Poverty Alejandra Mancilla <p>2018.08.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-right-of-necessity-moral-cosmopolitanism-and-global-poverty/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Alejandra Mancilla, <em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">The Right of Necessity: Moral Cosmopolitanism and Global Poverty</span></em>, Rowman &amp; Littlefield, 2016, 140pp., $31.00 (pbk), ISBN 9781783485864.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Siegfried Van Duffel, Nazarbayev University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Imagine you are hiking and you somehow find yourself lost in a remote area. To make matters worse, a heavy storm erupts and you didn't bring camping supplies. If that wasn't enough, you are also running out of potable water. Luckily, you find a cabin in the woods which will provide shelter and which likely has the life-saving supplies you are in desperate need of. The cabin is locked, but with some force you will be able to enter. Is it morally permissible for you to do so? More generally, is it morally permissible to avail yourself of someone else's property without the consent of the owner if it is the only way for you to save your life?</p> <p... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-right-of-necessity-moral-cosmopolitanism-and-global-poverty/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/a-new-german-idealism-hegel-zizek-and-dialectical-materialism/ 2018-08-05T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-05T19:00:00-0400 A New German Idealism: Hegel, Žižek, and Dialectical Materialism Adrian Johnston <p>2018.08.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-new-german-idealism-hegel-zizek-and-dialectical-materialism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Adrian Johnston, <em>A New German Idealism: Hegel, Žižek, and Dialectical Materialism</em>, Columbia University Press, 2018, 376pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780231183949.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robert B. Pippin, University of Chicago</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The current book by Adrian Johnston continues his extensive engagement with the work of Slavoj Žižek, and so with the question of a proper statement of a contemporary "dialectical materialism," an issue that for both of them hangs on a proper reading of Hegel's theoretical work. Johnston's book <em>Žižek's Ontology</em> (2008) dealt with Žižek's work up until <em>The Parallax View</em> (2006). His <em>Badious, Žižek, and Political Transformations: The Cadence of Change</em> (2009) deals with Žižek up until <em>In Defense of Lost Causes</em> (2008). The current volume deals predominantly with two works; a work Johnston often refers to as Žižek's <em>chef d'ouevre</em> or masterpiece, <em>Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism</em> (2012), and its subsequent restatement and reformulation,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/a-new-german-idealism-hegel-zizek-and-dialectical-materialism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/determined-by-reasons-a-competence-account-of-acting-for-a-normative-reason/ 2018-08-02T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-02T21:00:00-0400 Determined by Reasons: A Competence Account of Acting for a Normative Reason Susanne Mantel <p>2018.08.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/determined-by-reasons-a-competence-account-of-acting-for-a-normative-reason/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Susanne Mantel, <em>Determined by Reasons: A Competence Account of Acting for a Normative Reason</em>, Routledge, 2018, 190pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 780815394334.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Rüdiger Bittner, Universität Bielefeld</strong></p> <p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Susanne Mantel's aim in this book is to understand what it is to act for a normative reason. Assuming with a number of writers that normative reasons typically are facts in the world, not facts about the minds of the agents in question, she parts company with most of these writers by denying that a normative reason, when acted upon, is also a motivating reason. Denying this identity allows her to take up, while committed to the worldly view of reasons, the tradition in action theory which explains acting for reasons by reference to mental states, like beliefs and desires. To be sure, having actions be caused by beliefs and desires, which used to be the orthodox view in this tradition,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/determined-by-reasons-a-competence-account-of-acting-for-a-normative-reason/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/challenging-the-modern-synthesis-adaptation-development-and-inheritanc/ 2018-08-02T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-03T17:37:05-0400 Challenging the Modern Synthesis: Adaptation, Development, and Inheritance Philippe Huneman and Denis M. Walsh (eds.) <p>2018.08.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/challenging-the-modern-synthesis-adaptation-development-and-inheritanc/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Philippe Huneman and Denis M. Walsh (eds.), <em>Challenging the Modern Synthesis: Adaptation, Development, and Inheritance</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 368pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199377176.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Ehud Lamm, Tel Aviv University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This collection joins a long parade of attempts to slay an aging, decrepit, beast. This beast of mythical status being the Modern Synthesis in evolutionary biology. As some of the authors in this collection note, it is far from clear whether these attempts do not in fact invigorate the beast, keeping it alert and nimble. As someone in the business of developing traps for the monster and its lookalikes, reading this collection I found myself identifying with the beast, clearly the underdog here as in many philosophy of biology circles, if not in Real Life, that is, in university biology departments. I also ended up not sure if everyone is chasing the same monster or maybe we are chasing shadows,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/challenging-the-modern-synthesis-adaptation-development-and-inheritanc/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/from-plural-to-institutional-agency-collective-action-ii/ 2018-08-01T21:00:00-0400 2018-08-02T09:45:28-0400 From Plural to Institutional Agency: Collective Action II Kirk Ludwig <p>2018.08.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/from-plural-to-institutional-agency-collective-action-ii/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Kirk Ludwig, <em>From Plural to Institutional Agency: Collective Action II,</em> Oxford University Press, 2017, 312pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198789994.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Michael E. Bratman, Stanford University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Kirk Ludwig's concern in this trenchant, probing, and important book is to articulate continuities between "plural agency" (e.g., you and I paint the house together) and what we talk about when we talk about<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> the agency of "singular groups" -- where these include both mobs and (the primary concern of this book) institutions such as corporations or nation states. In the background is Ludwig's first volume in this two-volume work: <em>From Individual to Plural Agency</em> (Oxford University Press, 2016). In that first volume Ludwig understands intentional plural agency as involving a single event (e.g., our house painting) of which several individuals (e.g., each of us) are intentional agents with relevant "we-intentions". Such we-intentions... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/from-plural-to-institutional-agency-collective-action-ii/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/virtues-reasons-new-essays-on-virtue-character-and-reasons/ 2018-08-01T19:00:00-0400 2018-08-01T19:00:00-0400 Virtue's Reasons: New Essays on Virtue, Character, and Reasons Noell Birondo and S. Stewart Braun (eds.) <p>2018.08.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/virtues-reasons-new-essays-on-virtue-character-and-reasons/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Noell Birondo and S. Stewart Braun (eds.), <em>Virtue's Reasons: New Essays on Virtue, Character, and Reasons</em>, Routledge, 2017, 210pp., $150.00 (hbk), ISBN</strong><strong> </strong><strong>9781138231733.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jason Kawall, Colgate University</strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">According to the editors, Noell Birondo and S. Stewart Braun,</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The main aims of this book are . . . to foster a greater appreciation for the multiplicity of reasons surrounding the concept of the virtues and to shed light on what is presumably the paradigm case, of an individual agent responding to an array of potential reasons, often in diverse circumstances and contexts. (2-3)</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">While the virtues are often treated as allowing agents to recognize and respond appropriately to reasons, Birondo and Braun note that there are broader connections and questions concerning the relationship between reasons and the virtues that warrant examination: for example, are there distinctive kinds of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/virtues-reasons-new-essays-on-virtue-character-and-reasons/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/aristotles-generation-of-animals-a-critical-guide/ 2018-07-31T21:00:00-0400 2018-07-31T21:00:00-0400 Aristotle's Generation of Animals: A Critical Guide Andrea Falcon and David Lefebvre (eds.) <p>2018.07.39 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aristotles-generation-of-animals-a-critical-guide/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Andrea Falcon and David Lefebvre (eds.), <em>Aristotle's Generation of Animals:</em> <em>A Critical Guide</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 304pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107132931.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Sylvia Berryman, University of British Columbia</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-weight:normal">A series of critical essays by major scholars in the field, rather than a blow-by-blow analysis of a text, Andrea Falcon and David Lefebvre's recent collection of works on Aristotle's embryological treatise fills a significant gap in the recent literature on Aristotle's biology. The collection was originally co-edited by Allan Gotthelf, but his death in 2013 prevented him from completing the task. Conferences organized by Gotthelf, Lefebvre and Devin Henry contributed to the vetting of the contributions to this volume, which aims to present a comprehensive and up-to-date view on the major philosophical issues and controversies surrounding the work. The persisting prejudice in academic publishing that collections originating with conferences are mere 'proceedings' is simply inapplicable in this... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aristotles-generation-of-animals-a-critical-guide/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-quantum-revolution-in-philosophy/ 2018-07-31T19:00:00-0400 2018-07-31T19:00:00-0400 The Quantum Revolution in Philosophy Richard Healey <p>2018.07.38 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-quantum-revolution-in-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Richard Healey, <em>The Quantum Revolution in Philosophy</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198714057.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Alastair Wilson, University of Birmingham</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Richard Healey is not messing around. His new book on quantum theory promises to overturn most of what we thought we knew about the quantum world (spoiler alert: there is no such thing), and in the process prompt a reappraisal of long-held assumptions about explanation, causation and other core scientific concepts. Quantum theory "is a new kind of science" (p.8) that "is simply not in the business of representing what happens in the physical world" (p.3); our recognizing this fact "should prompt a reassessment of a variety of views in the philosophy of science, metaphysics, and philosophy more generally" (p.9).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Extraordinary claims require extraordinary arguments, and these are a little thin on the ground in... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-quantum-revolution-in-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p>