tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2019-05-16T19:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-hiddenness-of-god/ 2019-05-16T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-16T19:00:00-0400 The Hiddenness of God Michael C. Rea <p>2019.05.14 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-hiddenness-of-god/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Michael C. Rea, <em>The Hiddenness of God</em>,<em> </em>Oxford University Press, 2018, 198pp., $30.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198826019.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Charity Anderson, Baylor University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Some people seek God, but seem not to find him. To others, God seems distant or absent. In one way or another, God seems hidden to many people. This is unexpected if there is a God who wants us to know that he exists, and even more puzzling if there is a God that loves us. Not only is the situation puzzling, but it causes some people significant pain. In various ways, divine hiddenness has been thought to pose a challenge to traditional Christian theism. Michael C. Rea's book offers a multifaceted response to phenomena related to God's apparent hiddenness and the family of philosophical problems it raises.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The version of the hiddenness problem most... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-hiddenness-of-god/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/foucault-feminism-and-sex-crimes-an-anti-carceral-analysis/ 2019-05-15T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-15T19:00:00-0400 Foucault, Feminism, and Sex Crimes: An Anti-Carceral Analysis Chloë Taylor <p>2019.05.13 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/foucault-feminism-and-sex-crimes-an-anti-carceral-analysis/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Chloë Taylor, <em>Foucault, Feminism, and Sex Crimes: An Anti-Carceral Analysis</em>, Routledge, 2019, 272pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138367319.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jemima Repo, Newcastle University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a rich, rigorously argued, and provocative volume that makes a distinctive new contribution to the Foucauldian feminist literature on sex crimes. In addition to its core work of bringing together Michel Foucault's writings on rape and other sexual 'deviancies' with abolitionist perspectives on crime and punishment, readers of Foucault will welcome the inclusion of the full 1868 medical legal report on Charles Jouy, both in its original French and an English translation by Chloë Taylor and James Merleau. The book's main offerings, however, extend well beyond Foucault; it staunchly argues for a non-pathologising, abolitionist feminism through engagement with issues such as rape, child sexual abuse, and sex work that are at the forefront of current feminist debates.</p> <p... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/foucault-feminism-and-sex-crimes-an-anti-carceral-analysis/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/in-our-best-interest-a-defense-of-paternalism/ 2019-05-14T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-14T19:00:00-0400 In Our Best Interest: A Defense of Paternalism Jason Hanna <p>2019.05.12 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/in-our-best-interest-a-defense-of-paternalism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jason Hanna, <em>In Our Best Interest: </em><em>A Defense of Paternalism</em>,<em> </em>Oxford University Press, 2018, 271pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190877132.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Andrew I. Cohen, Georgia State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Liberals typically treat freedom as a fundamental value in political morality. They then often argue that paternalism is an unjustified restriction on liberty. Paternalism is interference with a person's choices against or without her endorsement in order to protect her from harm. Liberal critics sometimes object to paternalism because it gives power over our choices to persons who seldom deserve it, often abuse it, and rarely apply it correctly. Even if paternalism can be effective, liberal critics often complain it disrespects us as persons. It infantilizes by usurping a person's authority over her life and denying her the opportunity to be a full arbiter of her destiny.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">On Jason Hanna's account, such complaints about paternalism... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/in-our-best-interest-a-defense-of-paternalism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/socially-extended-epistemology/ 2019-05-13T21:00:00-0400 2019-05-13T21:00:00-0400 Socially Extended Epistemology J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos, and Duncan Pritchard (eds.) <p>2019.05.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/socially-extended-epistemology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos, and Duncan Pritchard (eds.), <em>Socially Extended Epistemology</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 318pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198801764.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Joseph Shieber, Lafayette College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">I know the way from my house in the suburbs of Philadelphia to Carnegie Hall in New York City. Okay, yes: <em>practice</em> (very amusing). The more promising route for me, however, is the one encoded in the GPS-enabled maps app included on my cell phone. I also know that the Seleucid Empire once stretched roughly from what is now present-day Turkey to Pakistan and Turkmenistan. I know that because I read it . . . somewhere, although I no longer recall where.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">If you're like me, you know information like those little tidbits not because of information stored "inside your head" -- or at least not <em>solely</em> because of the information stored there -- but... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/socially-extended-epistemology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/reading-wittgenstein-with-anscombe-going-on-to-ethics/ 2019-05-12T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-12T19:00:00-0400 Reading Wittgenstein with Anscombe, Going On to Ethics Cora Diamond <p>2019.05.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/reading-wittgenstein-with-anscombe-going-on-to-ethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Cora Diamond, <em>Reading Wittgenstein with Anscombe, Going On to Ethics</em>, Harvard University Press, 2019, 331pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674051683.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Duncan Richter, Virginia Military Institute</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The title of this book is slightly unusual, which gives a clue to the nature of the book itself. It reflects quite literally what the book is about -- there are five essays on Wittgenstein, with special reference to what can be learned from Anscombe about his work, followed by two on ethics. However, it also reflects the history of Diamond's work: she studied the <em>Tractatus </em>with help from Anscombe's book on it early in her career, and has since gone on to do important work in ethics, of a notably Wittgensteinian, though undeniably original, kind. It is also appropriate that the title describes activity and movement. This book is not primarily an account or even a defense, although it... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/reading-wittgenstein-with-anscombe-going-on-to-ethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/capabilities-in-a-just-society-a-theory-of-navigational-agency/ 2019-05-09T21:00:00-0400 2019-05-09T21:00:00-0400 Capabilities in a Just Society: A Theory of Navigational Agency Rutger Claassen <p>2019.05.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/capabilities-in-a-just-society-a-theory-of-navigational-agency/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Rutger Claassen, <em>Capabilities in a Just Society: A Theory of Navigational Agency,</em> Cambridge University Press, 2018, 264pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781108473262.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen, Copenhagen University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This well-argued and thought-provoking book will be of particular interest to philosophers working in the fields of social or political justice, the capability approach (whether pro or contra), political liberalism or public reason, and the perfectionism/neutrality and liberal/communitarian discussions.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Rutger Claassen aims to develop an account of political justice situated in the capability approach but more sensitive to the aims and values of liberalism than the standard capability approach. He characterizes his position as "moderately perfectionist liberal" -- less perfectionist than Martha Nussbaum's influential account, but more perfectionist than (e.g., Rawlsian) political liberalism. Roughly, Claassen endorses perfectionism insofar as the values of freedom and autonomy are built into the core of his theory of justice;... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/capabilities-in-a-just-society-a-theory-of-navigational-agency/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/from-psychology-to-morality-essays-in-ethical-naturalism/ 2019-05-08T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-08T19:00:00-0400 From Psychology to Morality: Essays in Ethical Naturalism John Deigh <p>2019.05.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/from-psychology-to-morality-essays-in-ethical-naturalism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John Deigh, <em>From Psychology to Morality: Essays in Ethical Naturalism</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 275pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190878597.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Karsten R. Stueber, College of the Holy Cross</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Since ancient times, philosophers have wondered how exactly to account for the status of morality in the lives of human beings. Ancient philosophers were very much concerned with understanding how our moral lives are grounded in the structure of our psyche and how its various parts, specifically reason and emotions, contribute to making us moral agents who feel bound by the demands of virtue and justice. Yet merely integrating psychological considerations within the context of one's moral philosophy is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for counting as an ethical naturalist. Plato certainly had some interesting things to say about moral psychology, but he argued that the objectivity of moral judgments and the authority of moral norms are ultimately... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/from-psychology-to-morality-essays-in-ethical-naturalism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/for-the-love-of-metaphysics-nihilism-and-the-conflict-of-reason-from-kant-to-rosenzweig/ 2019-05-07T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-07T19:00:00-0400 For the Love of Metaphysics: Nihilism and the Conflict of Reason from Kant to Rosenzweig Karin Nisenbaum <p>2019.05.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/for-the-love-of-metaphysics-nihilism-and-the-conflict-of-reason-from-kant-to-rosenzweig/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Karin Nisenbaum, <em>For the Love of Metaphysics: Nihilism and the Conflict of Reason from Kant to Rosenzweig</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 280pp., $85.00 (hbk), <span style="background:white">ISBN 9780190680640.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Peter Thielke, Pomona College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">While nihilist attitudes have always lurked in the dark corners of philosophy, the term 'nihilism' did not enter the lexicon until the 1780s, when it was coined by the German philosopher F.H. Jacobi to describe what he saw as the inevitable descent of rationalism into a denial of the world. That might seem like an obscure and musty historical curiosity, but Karin Nisenbaum, in her excellent book, makes the provocative -- and compelling -- case that Jacobi's nihilist challenge both informs much of the path of German Idealism and remains a pressing concern for contemporary philosophy. Beginning with Jacobi and the 'rational skepticism' of Jacobi's contemporary Salomon Maimon, Nisembaum explores the ways in which Kant, Fichte, Schelling and Rosenzweig attempt... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/for-the-love-of-metaphysics-nihilism-and-the-conflict-of-reason-from-kant-to-rosenzweig/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-problem-of-evil-eight-views-in-dialogue/ 2019-05-06T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-06T19:00:00-0400 The Problem of Evil: Eight Views in Dialogue N. N. Trakakis (ed.) <p>2019.05.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-problem-of-evil-eight-views-in-dialogue/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">N. N. Trakakis (ed.), <em>The Problem of Evil: Eight Views in Dialogue</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 233pp., $58.50 (hbk), ISBN 9780198821625.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Daniel M. Johnson, Shawnee State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book consists of eight essays, each summarizing an approach to the problem of evil, together with exchanges among the contributors. The authors are arranged in two groups. The first includes Eleonore Stump, John Bishop, Graham Oppy, and N. N. Trakakis; the second, Beverly Clack, Yujin Nagasawa, Terrence W. Tilley, and Andrew Gleeson. Each article is followed by responses from the other three members of the group and a final response by the original contributor.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">In his introduction, the editor (N. N. Trakakis) indicates that his goal for the volume is to bring attention to approaches to the problem of evil which break out of the usual dialectic, which he characterizes as a kind of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-problem-of-evil-eight-views-in-dialogue/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/seeing-knowing-understanding/ 2019-05-05T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-05T19:00:00-0400 Seeing, Knowing, Understanding Barry Stroud <p>2019.05.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/seeing-knowing-understanding/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Barry Stroud, <em>Seeing, Knowing, Understanding</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 277pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198809753.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Catherine Z. Elgin, Harvard University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The book consists of a series of articles written between 2001 and 2017. Most were previously published. Apart from a couple of autobiographical pieces, they concern topics in epistemology and related fields that have preoccupied Barry Stroud for many years -- skepticism, perceptual knowledge, color, judgment. Several are his contributions to ongoing debates. Stroud's epistemological position is complex. The papers on seemingly diverse topics are mutually illuminating and mutually reinforcing. Here I will focus on a line of argument that runs through the papers.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Stroud recognizes that Cartesian skepticism is a deep philosophical problem. Many epistemologists disagree. They think that the skeptic's argument suffers from an easily identifiable, easily correctible flaw. Perhaps Descartes set his... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/seeing-knowing-understanding/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/philosophy-of-finitude-heidegger-levinas-and-nietzsche/ 2019-05-02T21:00:00-0400 2019-05-02T21:00:00-0400 Philosophy of Finitude: Heidegger, Levinas, and Nietzsche Rafael Winkler <p>2019.05.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/philosophy-of-finitude-heidegger-levinas-and-nietzsche/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Rafael Winkler, <em>Philosophy of Finitude: Heidegger, Levinas, and Nietzsche</em>, Bloomsbury, 2018, 151pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350059368.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Ingo Farin, University of Tasmania</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The book explores crucial themes in Heidegger, Levinas and Nietzsche, primarily centred around the problem of death and dying (chapter one), self and other (chapter two), figurations of being (chapter three), dwelling (chapter four), truth and error (chapter five), and the concept of substance (chapter six). With the exception of the last chapter, Rafael Winkler shows how Heidegger, Levinas, and Nietzsche, as well as Derrida and Ricoeur (not mentioned in the subtitle, but very present throughout the book) are key-players in the still ongoing debate about: (1) the nature of the subject, (2) the limits of thought and experience, and (3) the human dependence on and responsibility for the earth on which we dwell as mortals, neighbours, strangers and guest... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/philosophy-of-finitude-heidegger-levinas-and-nietzsche/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/why-we-disagree-about-human-nature/ 2019-05-02T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-02T19:00:00-0400 Why We Disagree About Human Nature Elizabeth Hannon and Tim Lewens (eds.) <p>2019.05.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/why-we-disagree-about-human-nature/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Elizabeth Hannon and Tim Lewens (eds.), <em>Why We Disagree About Human Nature</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 214pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198823650.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Tim Ingold, University of Aberdeen</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Why are scientists and philosophers so unable to let go of the concept of human nature? They have shown, repeatedly, why there can be no such thing, how the idea of a universal essence at the core of our humanity flies in the face of what we know of the evolution of species, our own included, namely that it depends on a variability intrinsic to all living organisms. Yet here are a bunch of philosophers and scientists <em>still</em> arguing about it. Half are for, half against, yet all are broadly agreed on the rejection of any strong form of essentialism. No single paper is cited more often in this volume than an essay, 'On human nature', published by the philosopher... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/why-we-disagree-about-human-nature/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/fellow-creatures-our-obligations-to-the-other-animals/ 2019-05-01T21:00:00-0400 2019-05-01T21:00:00-0400 Fellow Creatures: Our Obligations to the Other Animals Christine M. Korsgaard <p>2019.05.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/fellow-creatures-our-obligations-to-the-other-animals/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Christine M. Korsgaard, <em>Fellow Creatures: Our Obligations to the Other Animals</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 252pp., $24.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198753858</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mark H. Bernstein, Purdue University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-weight:normal">Christine Korsgaard has written an admirable book, accessible, cogently-argued, and thoughtful. She writes with bravery and humility, and perhaps most notably, with passion. It is evident that Korsgaard <em>cares</em> about the plight of animals, and yet the work is void of mawkish sentimentalism. All philosophers would benefit from a close reading; for any who are even remotely interested in animal ethics, reading <em>Fellow Creatures</em><em> </em>is obligatory.</span></strong></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The monograph is a defense of the claim that "we human beings are obligated to treat all sentient animals, that is, all animals who have subjective experiences that are pleasant or painful, as what Kant called "ends-in-themselves", in at least one sense of that notion" (xi). That... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/fellow-creatures-our-obligations-to-the-other-animals/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/agents-and-goals-in-evolution/ 2019-05-01T19:00:00-0400 2019-05-01T19:00:00-0400 Agents and Goals in Evolution Samir Okasha <p>2019.05.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/agents-and-goals-in-evolution/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Samir Okasha, <em>Agents and Goals in Evolution</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 254pp., $40.00 (hbk), <span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">ISBN </span><span style="background:white">9780198815082</span><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robert A. Wilson, La Trobe University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Samir Okasha's focus in<em> </em>this book<em> </em>is a pervasive way of describing and explaining organismic traits, including behaviours, what he calls, with a nod to Godfrey-Smith (2009), <em>agential thinking</em>. This is to think of evolved entities -- paradigmatically but not only organisms -- as agents with certain kinds of interests or goals that are pursued through strategies. Here explaining why organisms and other evolved entities have the phenotypic traits they do involves drawing on a subset of intentional idioms that ascribe psychological states to organisms, as Okasha says, "usually in an extended or metaphorical sense" (p.230).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">In <em>Genes and the Agents of Life</em> (2005), I referred to this aspect of agential thinking as a reliance... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/agents-and-goals-in-evolution/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-inconspicuous-god-heidegger-french-phenomenology-and-the-theological-turn/ 2019-04-30T21:00:00-0400 2019-05-02T00:23:47-0400 The Inconspicuous God: Heidegger, French Phenomenology, and the Theological Turn Jason W. Alvis <p>2019.04.37 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-inconspicuous-god-heidegger-french-phenomenology-and-the-theological-turn/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jason W. Alvis, <em>The Inconspicuous God: Heidegger, French Phenomenology, and the Theological Turn</em>, Indiana University Press, 2018, 249pp. $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253033321.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Bernard Prusak, King's College, Pennsylvania</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">We seem to live in an age, at least in the so-called Global North, from which God has withdrawn or is fast withdrawing. Consider, for example, that slightly more than half of U.S. adults raised as Catholics have left the church at some point. About one in five of those adults returned to the church, but two-thirds no longer consider themselves Catholic in any way, and half became disaffiliated from religion altogether. That is, they joined the growing number of "nones," currently nearing one quarter of U.S. adults, which is around the same number of U.S. Catholics in a population of 325 million. The trend toward disaffiliation is most pronounced among millennials, people who reached adulthood after 2000. All told,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-inconspicuous-god-heidegger-french-phenomenology-and-the-theological-turn/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/hobbes-and-modern-political-thought/ 2019-04-30T19:00:00-0400 2019-04-30T19:00:00-0400 Hobbes and Modern Political Thought Yves Charles Zarka <p>2019.04.36 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hobbes-and-modern-political-thought/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Yves Charles Zarka, <em>Hobbes and Modern Political Thought</em>, James Griffith (tr.), Edinburgh University Press, 2018, 257pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781474433464.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Ioannis D. Evrigenis, Tufts University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">As Thomas Hobbes welcomes the reader to <em>Leviathan</em>, he signals his intention to highlight the perils and promise of the meaning of words. In one striking early example, he notes that the purpose of reading his book is to teach one how to read human beings, beginning with oneself. Taking issue with those who overuse but fail to grasp the importance of "nosce teipsum," Hobbes takes the liberty of translating the command as "read thyself," before moving on to pronounce the reading of mankind an activity "harder than to learn any Language, or Science." Heeding the call to focus on the reading of both books and human beings, commentators have devoted considerable attention to that aspect of Hobbes's political theory,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hobbes-and-modern-political-thought/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/liberty-and-the-pursuit-of-knowledge-charles-renouviers-political-philosophy-of-science/ 2019-04-29T21:00:00-0400 2019-04-29T21:00:00-0400 Liberty and the Pursuit of Knowledge: Charles Renouvier's Political Philosophy of Science Warren Schmaus <p>2019.04.35 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/liberty-and-the-pursuit-of-knowledge-charles-renouviers-political-philosophy-of-science/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Warren Schmaus, <em>Liberty and the Pursuit of Knowledge: Charles Renouvier's Political Philosophy of Science</em>, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018, 154pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780822945352.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jeremy Dunham, University of Durham</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">French philosophy in the nineteenth-century remains a hugely under-researched and rich area of the history of philosophy. Few book-length English language studies of it exist. A recently published anthology on nineteenth-century philosophy makes reference only to Bergson,<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> a philosopher who flourished only at the very tail end of this era. Nonetheless, slowly but surely a number of articles and translations are starting to appear. French philosophers, such as Maine de Biran (1766-1824), Félix Ravaisson (1813-1900), and Clarisse Coignet (1823-1918) are being studied again -- and it is clear that they have important and interesting philosophical things to say on a broad range of issues. Perhaps the most profound and exciting of all the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/liberty-and-the-pursuit-of-knowledge-charles-renouviers-political-philosophy-of-science/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/feelings-transformed-philosophical-theories-of-the-emotions-1270-1670/ 2019-04-29T19:00:00-0400 2019-04-29T19:00:00-0400 Feelings Transformed: Philosophical Theories of the Emotions, 1270-1670 Dominik Perler <p>2019.04.34 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/feelings-transformed-philosophical-theories-of-the-emotions-1270-1670/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Dominik Perler, <em>Feelings Transformed: Philosophical Theories of the Emotions, 1270-1670</em>, Tony Crawford (tr.), Oxford University Press, 2018, 350pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199383481.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by  Simo Knuuttila, University of Helsinki</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is a translation of Dominik Perler's <em>Transformationen der Gefühle</em> (S. Fischer, 2011). In five chapters, Perler describes and analyzes theories of emotions and their conceptual background structures in influential late medieval and early modern authors: 1. Thomas Aquinas: Emotions as Sensual Movements, 2. John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham: Emotions in the Will, 3. Michel de Montaigne: A Skeptical View of Emotions, 4. René Descartes: A Dualist View of Emotions, and 5. Baruch de Spinoza: Emotions as Psychophysical Units. The main chapters are preceded by an Introduction that discusses the philosophical study of emotions in general and the analysis of emotions in the history of philosophy. The concluding chapter is about the theories discussed and their metaphysical biases... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/feelings-transformed-philosophical-theories-of-the-emotions-1270-1670/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/disability-in-practice-attitudes-policies-and-relationships/ 2019-04-28T19:00:00-0400 2019-04-28T19:00:00-0400 Disability in Practice: Attitudes, Policies, and Relationships Adam Cureton and Thomas E. Hill, Jr. (eds) <p>2019.04.33 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/disability-in-practice-attitudes-policies-and-relationships/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Adam Cureton and Thomas E. Hill, Jr. (eds), <em>Disability in Practice: Attitudes, Policies, and Relationships</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 249pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198812876.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Linda Barclay, Monash University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">As the editors, Adam Cureton and Thomas E. Hill, Jr. suggest, the highlights of this excellent collection are the essays that deal explicitly with our complex attitudes to disability and how they affect our relationships and our medical, reproductive and parenting practices. These essays make up the first two sections of the book. The essays in the third section move beyond this theme, addressing more established debates about justice and moral status: Lawrence C. Becker extends his existing theory of habilitation to disability; Samuel Freeman defends Rawls's contractarian framework from well-known criticisms that it does not include or respect people with severe cognitive disabilities; Richard Galvin engages with debates about moral status; and Virginia L. Warren discusses the 'moral disabilities'... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/disability-in-practice-attitudes-policies-and-relationships/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/hippocrates-oath-and-asclepius-snake-the-birth-of-the-medical-profession/ 2019-04-25T21:00:00-0400 2019-04-25T21:00:00-0400 Hippocrates' Oath and Asclepius' Snake: The Birth of the Medical Profession T. A. Cavanaugh <p>2019.04.32 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hippocrates-oath-and-asclepius-snake-the-birth-of-the-medical-profession/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">T. A. Cavanaugh, <em>Hippocrates' Oath and Asclepius' Snake: The Birth of the Medical Profession</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 177pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190673673.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Marquis Berrey, University of Iowa</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">T.A. Cavanaugh aims to recapture the two essential therapeutic aims at the heart of medical practice with the philosophical claim that both beneficence and iatrogenic harm are central to our experience of medical practice. His book about the Hippocratic <em>Oath</em> discusses a set of symbols and professional documents about healing that generate the prescriptive tradition of Western medicine "to help, or not to harm" (Hippocrates, <em>Epidemics </em>1.11).<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> Cavanaugh's main interest in iatrogenic harm lies with the physician killing the patient. He collects historical and contemporary materials about physicians' involvement in euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and capital punishment (elective abortion receives only a passing glance) to argue that (74) "the desire to involve physicians in... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hippocrates-oath-and-asclepius-snake-the-birth-of-the-medical-profession/" >Read More</a> </p>