tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2018-04-19T21:00:00-0400 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/kant-and-the-question-of-theology/ 2018-04-19T21:00:00-0400 2018-04-19T21:00:00-0400 Kant and the Question of Theology Chris L. Firestone, Nathan A. Jacobs, and James H. Joiner (eds.) <p>2018.04.19 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kant-and-the-question-of-theology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Chris L. Firestone, Nathan A. Jacobs, and James H. Joiner (eds.), <em>Kant and the Question of Theology</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, pp.260, $99.99, ISBN 9781107116818.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Stephen R. Palmquist, Hong Kong Baptist University/Sogang University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This collection of twelve essays on various themes relating to Kant's theology and theory of religion is the latest contribution to a welcome trend in Kant-scholarship that has been steadily increasing for 25 years: to treat Kant's philosophical theology as seriously as Kant himself treated it. Before 1993 the number of books on this theme each decade could be counted on one hand; since the mid-1990s, multiple books have appeared each year. Chris L. Firestone and Nathan A. Jacobs have contributed significantly to this trend during the past twelve years, (co-)producing four volumes since 2006. The editors thus portray the trend as having significantly increased after Firestone and Jacobs 2008 (hereafter <em>IDKR</em>) appeared: <em>IDKR </em>"led to a new flood of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kant-and-the-question-of-theology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/peirces-speculative-grammar-logic-as-semiotics/ 2018-04-19T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-19T19:00:00-0400 Peirce's Speculative Grammar: Logic as Semiotics Francesco Bellucci <p>2018.04.18 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/peirces-speculative-grammar-logic-as-semiotics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Francesco Bellucci, <a name="_Hlk509580479"><em>Peirce's Speculative Grammar</em></a><em>: Logic as Semiotics</em>, Routledge, 2018, 388 pp., $150.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415793506.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mats Bergman, University of Helsinki</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Francesco Bellucci offers an erudite exposition of the fundaments of Charles S. Peirce's philosophical theory of signs. His study is both highly ambitious and rigorously delimited, seeking to reconstruct the logical character and systematic development of Peirce's semiotic grammar by means of close readings of the original texts. The book is organised chronologically, setting out from Peirce's first explicit references to "general grammar" in the mid-1860s and closing with his final observations on the theory of signs around 1910. This is thus a distinctly exegetical undertaking, which ought to be of interest for theoretical semioticians and historians of logic, but which is primarily geared towards seasoned Peirce scholars.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Bellucci is clear about the boundaries of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/peirces-speculative-grammar-logic-as-semiotics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/scientific-collaboration-and-collaborative-knowledge-new-essays/ 2018-04-18T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-18T19:00:00-0400 Scientific Collaboration and Collaborative Knowledge: New Essays Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson, Michael Weisberg (eds.) <p>2018.04.17 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/scientific-collaboration-and-collaborative-knowledge-new-essays/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson, Michael Weisberg (eds.), <em>Scientific Collaboration and Collaborative Knowledge: New Essays</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 214 pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190680534.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by P.D. Magnus, University at Albany SUNY</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is an aptly-titled volume of new essays in philosophy of science on the theme of scientific collaboration. Many of the papers provide formal models, some concern the details of science as it is actually practiced, and some do both.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Despite the formal nature of some of the papers, I found them all to be readable. A few have appendices which elaborate on the mathematics or prove lemmas and which I confess skipping over. I am not an expert in the specific methods or models, but I was able to follow the papers.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">A general worry about formal methods is that they can fail to connect with science as it... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/scientific-collaboration-and-collaborative-knowledge-new-essays/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/radical-skepticism-and-the-shadow-of-doubt-a-philosophical-dialogue/ 2018-04-17T21:00:00-0400 2018-04-17T21:00:00-0400 Radical Skepticism and the Shadow of Doubt: A Philosophical Dialogue Eli Hirsch <p>2018.04.16 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/radical-skepticism-and-the-shadow-of-doubt-a-philosophical-dialogue/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Eli Hirsch, <em>Radical Skepticism and the Shadow of Doubt: A Philosophical Dialogue</em>, Bloomsbury, 2018, 238pp., $24.95, ISBN 9781350033856.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Samuel Lebens, University of Haifa</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The best dialogues avoid pitting strong intellects against yes-men. Instead, they present a real clash between diverse voices, forcing one another to refine their position in light of each other's criticisms. This allows the reader to see to the heart of the issues that divide the protagonists. Hirsch's dialogue does just that, and with wonderful theatricality.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:8pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Hirsch's richly conceived characters have just stepped outside of the study-hall of a rabbinical seminary (a <em>Yeshiva</em>), to discuss epistemology in the bathroom. At one point, the fourth-wall is broken, and the characters express their awareness that they are characters of Hirsch's creation. In this text, therefore, we find the cutting philosophical dialogue of a George Berkeley, a dash... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/radical-skepticism-and-the-shadow-of-doubt-a-philosophical-dialogue/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/abortion-rights-for-and-against/ 2018-04-17T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-17T19:00:00-0400 Abortion Rights: For and Against Kate Greasley and Christopher Kaczor <p>2018.04.15 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/abortion-rights-for-and-against/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Kate Greasley and Christopher Kaczor, <em>Abortion Rights: For and Against</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 260pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 9781316621851.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by M. T. Lu, University of St. Thomas (Minnesota)</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The editorial front matter in this volume claims that the book "gives readers a window into how moral philosophers argue about the contention issue of abortion rights." As a descriptive claim this strikes me as largely true. Unfortunately, how many "moral philosophers" actually do argue about this issue is not how they should.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The book consists of two essays written (apparently independently) by Kate Greasley (pro-abortion) and by Christopher Kaczor (anti-abortion), followed by a response from each author to the other, and finally a short reply to each response. Greasley begins the central argumentative part of her essay in favor of abortion rights by conceding what she calls the "silver bullet," namely that "if the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/abortion-rights-for-and-against/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-philosopher-a-history-in-six-types/ 2018-04-16T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-16T19:00:00-0400 The Philosopher: A History in Six Types Justin E.H. Smith <p>2018.04.14 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosopher-a-history-in-six-types/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Justin E.H. Smith, <em>The Philosopher: A History in Six Types</em>, Princeton University Press, 2016, 272pp. $27.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163277.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Christopher Hamilton, King's College London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">When I first went to university to read philosophy, I arrived full of burning existential questions about life, its confusions and meaning, and was pleased when my teachers assured me that philosophy was, as I had read before I arrived, the love of wisdom, and that philosophers made the question 'What is philosophy?' part of their very subject matter. But it seemed to me that they forgot about wisdom on day one of teaching and none of them engaged the students in any serious reflection on the nature of philosophy. On the contrary, they seemed content to work within a particular understanding of it, and I remained dismayed that in, for example, my ethics classes the novels, plays and poems... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosopher-a-history-in-six-types/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/true-enough/ 2018-04-15T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-15T19:00:00-0400 True Enough Catherine Z. Elgin <p>2018.04.13 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/true-enough/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Catherine Z. Elgin, <em>True Enough</em>, MIT Press, 2017, 337pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262036535.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Henk W. de Regt, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This new book by Catherine Elgin demonstrates her versatility as a philosopher and reflects the broad spectrum of her philosophical interests and expertise. First and foremost, it presents an original, fruitful blend of epistemology and philosophy of science. But it also contains excursions into aesthetics, ethics and the philosophy of history. Elgin weaves these strands together in a way that both impresses and enlightens the reader. One of the book's central topics is the nature of understanding, and here Elgin has played a major role in bridging the divide between epistemology and philosophy of science. Her 1996 book <em>Considered Judgment</em> already demonstrated that she likes to cross boundaries between philosophical disciplines, developing ideas that transcend specialist discourse. In her new... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/true-enough/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/vital-forces-teleology-and-organization-philosophy-of-nature-and-the-rise-of-biology-in-germany/ 2018-04-12T21:00:00-0400 2018-04-12T21:00:00-0400 Vital Forces, Teleology and Organization: Philosophy of Nature and the Rise of Biology in Germany Andrea Gambarotto <p>2018.04.12 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/vital-forces-teleology-and-organization-philosophy-of-nature-and-the-rise-of-biology-in-germany/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Andrea Gambarotto, <em>Vital Forces, Teleology and Organization: Philosophy of Nature and the Rise of Biology in Germany</em>, Springer, 2018, 137 pp., $109.99, ISBN 9783319654140.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Georg Toepfer, Center for Literary and Cultural Research Berlin</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The book offers a detailed reconstruction of the decisive phase of biology in the German context at the turn of the nineteenth century. In his foreword, François Duchesneau calls the monograph "an important milestone for understanding how biology came about as an independent science" (p. v). The book emerged out of a dissertation and has a clear narrative for the "rise of biology", with the decisive ingredients mentioned in the book's title: vital forces, teleology and organization. The hypothesis of "vital forces", not in the sense of metaphysical but of physical factors specific to living beings, prepared the ground by allowing for an account of life-defining processes such as nutrition, growth and reproduction that depend on the nature of the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/vital-forces-teleology-and-organization-philosophy-of-nature-and-the-rise-of-biology-in-germany/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/language-and-being-heideggers-linguistics/ 2018-04-12T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-12T19:00:00-0400 Language and Being: Heidegger's Linguistics Duane Williams <p>2018.04.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/language-and-being-heideggers-linguistics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Duane Williams, <em>Language and Being: Heidegger's Linguistics</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 218pp., $114.00, ISBN 9781472573155.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by William McNeill, DePaul University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="background:white">This book provides a useful exploration of Heidegger's understanding of language in relation to his thinking of Being, arguing that these two, language and Being, are inextricably intertwined. Although Being is not reducible to language, the disclosure of something as being (and thus standing in Being) occurs only by way of language. Language is thus, in Heidegger's famous phrase from his "Letter on 'Humanism'" that serves as the foundation of this present study, "the house of Being," creating a dwelling site or abode in which humans and all things can be. Heidegger's reflections on language are not only notoriously difficult and complicated, but also appear "scattered in an assortment of essays," as the author puts it, and the stated... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/language-and-being-heideggers-linguistics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/chinese-and-buddhist-philosophy-in-early-twentieth-century-german-thought/ 2018-04-11T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-11T19:00:00-0400 Chinese and Buddhist Philosophy in Early Twentieth-Century German Thought Eric Nelson <p>2018.04.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/chinese-and-buddhist-philosophy-in-early-twentieth-century-german-thought/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Eric Nelson, <em>Chinese and Buddhist Philosophy in Early Twentieth-Century German Thought</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 344 pp., $114.00, ISBN 9781350002555.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Kwok-ying Lau, The Chinese University of Hong Kong</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In our present age of globalization, more and more people identify themselves as global citizens. To them, intercultural experience seems evident. Yet intercultural encounter in philosophy is still not yet a widely shared experience. This is particularly true in the West, where teaching and research in philosophy are organized basically in the same institutional setting as a century ago in which non-Western philosophies can hardly find their place. Seen in this context, Eric Nelson's book has the great merit of drawing our attention to the experiences of some great forerunners in intercultural philosophy in Weimar Germany from the end of World War I to the rise of National Socialism in 1933. Nelson's book is not merely a work on some... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/chinese-and-buddhist-philosophy-in-early-twentieth-century-german-thought/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/phenomenology-of-plurality-hannah-arendt-on-political-intersubjectivity/ 2018-04-10T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-10T19:00:00-0400 Phenomenology of Plurality: Hannah Arendt on Political Intersubjectivity Sophie Loidolt <p>2018.04.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/phenomenology-of-plurality-hannah-arendt-on-political-intersubjectivity/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Sophie Loidolt, <em>Phenomenology of Plurality: Hannah Arendt on Political Intersubjectivity</em>, Routledge, 2018, 290pp., $140.00, ISBN: 9781138631892.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Robert Sinnerbrink, Macquarie University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Sophie Loidolt's book is timely and impressive. It makes a significant contribution to the critical reception of Arendt's work, not only as a political philosopher but also as a member of the second wave of phenomenological thinkers (such as Merleau-Ponty and Sartre) who brought insights from 'classical' phenomenology (Husserl and Heidegger) to a range of ethical and political concerns. Loidolt's task is twofold: to rescue Arendt from critical theory and poststructuralist critiques, and to show how Arendt's work offers a phenomenologically grounded account of plurality, intersubjectivity, and politics. Her book is a great example of reconstructive critical interpretation that challenges prevailing interpretations and develops anew Arendt's phenomenological approach to political intersubjectivity.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The book has two... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/phenomenology-of-plurality-hannah-arendt-on-political-intersubjectivity/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/how-to-be-good-the-possibility-of-moral-enhancement/ 2018-04-09T21:00:00-0400 2018-04-09T21:00:00-0400 How to be Good: The Possibility of Moral Enhancement John Harris <p>2018.04.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-to-be-good-the-possibility-of-moral-enhancement/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John Harris, <em>How to be Good: The Possibility of Moral Enhancement</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 195pp., $40.00, ISBN 9780198707592.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Daniel Moseley, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill</strong></p> <p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">John Harris's influential work on human enhancement has strongly advocated the development, use, and exchange of human enhancement technologies. The types of enhancement that are of interest are biomedical interventions, including gene therapies, pharmaceuticals, and robotic neural implants, that are used to improve human capacities beyond what is necessary to achieve or maintain health or "normal functioning". For over thirty years, Harris has defended human enhancement projects in four books and over a hundred articles. The present volume is unique in this body of work in that it takes a more cautious stance regarding moral enhancements than he has taken toward other forms of human enhancement, such as cognitive enhancements.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Although the book purports to... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-to-be-good-the-possibility-of-moral-enhancement/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/ature-and-normativity-biology-teleology-and-meaning/ 2018-04-09T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-09T19:00:00-0400 Nature and Normativity: Biology, Teleology, and Meaning Mark Okrent <p>2018.04.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/ature-and-normativity-biology-teleology-and-meaning/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Mark Okrent, <em>Nature and Normativity: Biology, Teleology, and Meaning</em>, Routledge, 2018, 237pp., $140.00, ISBN 9781138244665.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Justin Garson, Hunter College, The City University of New York</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The purpose of Okrent's book is to pose and answer two questions: what is a norm (an <em>ought</em>, a <em>should</em>, a <em>supposed to</em>)? And how can there be creatures that are responsive to norms? That is, how can there be creatures that act as they do <em>because</em> that's what they're supposed to do? Okrent's thesis, as indicated by the title, is that norms are rooted in biology; specifically, they're grounded in the organism's need to perpetuate its own existence. Once we understand how norms are grounded in biology, we can understand normative aspects of social roles, tools, and language.<br> <br> If this project sounds vaguely familiar, it should. Philosophers have been laboring for decades to give a naturalistic account of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/ature-and-normativity-biology-teleology-and-meaning/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/imagination-and-social-perspectives-approaches-from-phenomenology-and-psychopathology/ 2018-04-08T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-08T19:00:00-0400 Imagination and Social Perspectives: Approaches from Phenomenology and Psychopathology Michela Summa, Thomas Fuchs and Luca Vanzago (eds.) <p>2018.04.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/imagination-and-social-perspectives-approaches-from-phenomenology-and-psychopathology/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Michela Summa, Thomas Fuchs and Luca Vanzago (eds.), <em>Imagination and Social Perspectives: Approaches from Phenomenology and Psychopathology</em>,<em> </em>Routledge, 2018, 358pp., $150.00, ISBN 9781138221000.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Kenneth Williford, University of Texas at Arlington</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This is an impressive and useful collection of seventeen "cross-pollinating", thematically overlapping, original papers of manageable length mainly devoted to some intersection of these topics: imagination, intersubjectivity (including here empathy, theory of mind, and simulation theory), perspective-taking, social intentionality (including "we-intentionality" and "collective imagining"), and aesthetics. As is appropriate for a volume in the recently inaugurated Routledge series, Research in Phenomenology, the papers are rooted in or at least make some contact with the phenomenological tradition. Husserl's treatments of imagination, perception, and intersubjectivity, among other matters, are very lucidly discussed throughout. And there are papers entirely or substantially devoted to Scheler, Stein, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and Levinas. As the subtitle indicates, the orientation is enriched by contributions (two of them by... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/imagination-and-social-perspectives-approaches-from-phenomenology-and-psychopathology/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/for-foucault-against-normative-political-theory/ 2018-04-05T21:00:00-0400 2018-04-05T21:00:00-0400 For Foucault: Against Normative Political Theory, Mark G. E. Kelly, <p>2018.04.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/for-foucault-against-normative-political-theory/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Mark G. E. Kelly, <em>For Foucault: Against Normative Political Theory</em>, State University of New York Press, 2018, 202pp., $80.00, ISBN 9781438467610.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Frieder Vogelmann, Bremen University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Mark Kelly's book is original, thought-provoking and at times infuriating. Its originality lies in Kelly's overall thesis that political thinking should follow Michel Foucault's model of a strictly non-normative critique. It is thought-provoking because Kelly combines his thesis with sharp criticism against all forms of normative political theory, be they (Rawlsian) analytic political philosophy or critical theory. Yet the book is infuriating because Kelly sometimes deliberately refuses to argue for his far-reaching claims.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Kelly sets the scene in his introduction with the stark opposition between normative political theory and Foucault's non-normative critique, understanding "normativity" as a synonym for "prescription." Political theory is normative if (and only if) it tells us what to do and how... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/for-foucault-against-normative-political-theory/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-philosophy-of-ontological-lateness-merleau-ponty-and-the-task-of-thinking/ 2018-04-05T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-05T19:00:00-0400 The Philosophy of Ontological Lateness: Merleau-Ponty and the Task of Thinking Keith Whitmoyer <p>2018.04.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosophy-of-ontological-lateness-merleau-ponty-and-the-task-of-thinking/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Keith Whitmoyer, <em>The Philosophy of Ontological Lateness: Merleau-Ponty and the Task of Thinking</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 224 pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350003972.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Michael R. Kelly, University of San Diego</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">As the work's title suggests, its target audience is scholars who work on Merleau-Ponty's philosophy in relation to twentieth- and twenty-first-century Continental philosophy. The book contains many fine (and fine-grained) analyses of major texts and themes in Merleau-Ponty's philosophy. Whitmoyer puts these analyses in dialogue with reflections on the history of philosophy and classical phenomenology (these seemingly read through the lenses of late Heideggerian and post-Heideggerian French philosophy) as well with figures such as Marcel Proust, Quentin Meillassoux, and Jean Luc Nancy. Though scholars who engage Merleau-Ponty from the tradition of classical phenomenology or analytical philosophy may find the book less approachable, this is an impassioned work in which most readers with an interest in Merleau-Ponty will find much to... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosophy-of-ontological-lateness-merleau-ponty-and-the-task-of-thinking/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/toleration-and-freedom-from-harm-liberalism-reconceived/ 2018-04-04T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-04T19:00:00-0400 Toleration and Freedom from Harm: Liberalism Reconceived Andrew Jason Cohen <p>2018.04.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/toleration-and-freedom-from-harm-liberalism-reconceived/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Andrew Jason Cohen, <em>Toleration and Freedom from Harm: Liberalism Reconceived</em>, Routledge, 2018, 217 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138631588.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Peter de Marneffe, Arizona State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number is self-protection. . . . The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">You might recognize this passage. It is from the first chapter of Mill's <em>On Liberty</em>. Andrew Jason Cohen agrees with it. He presents it four times in his book as a block quote (3, 48, 83, 103).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The principle stated by Mill's passage is known as the <em>harm principle</em>. Cohen accepts this principle. He believes it,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/toleration-and-freedom-from-harm-liberalism-reconceived/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/welfare-meaning-and-worth/ 2018-04-03T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-03T19:00:00-0400 Welfare, Meaning, and Worth Aaron Smuts <p>2018.04.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/welfare-meaning-and-worth/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Aaron Smuts, <em>Welfare, Meaning, and Worth</em>, Routledge, 2017, 160pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 97811382166224.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Andrew Moore, University of Otago</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Smuts states his mains goals as the development of his favored distinctions among worth, meaning and welfare, plus good theories of these three matters. This review outlines and assesses the book in terms of these goals.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Ch. 1 presents an overview of the book, and introduces its distinctions amongst worth, welfare, and meaning. The monograph focuses on life as a whole, and Ch. 2 appraises historically influential tests for lives worth living, and argues for appeal to what a benevolent caretaker would or wouldn't allow. Smuts takes the book's core theoretical contributions to be its accounts of life's worth (Ch. 3), welfare (Ch. 4), and meaning (Ch. 5). Ch. 6 adds arguments against welfarism in... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/welfare-meaning-and-worth/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/as-if-idealization-and-ideals/ 2018-04-02T19:00:00-0400 2018-04-16T11:32:19-0400 As If: Idealization and Ideals Kwame Anthony Appiah <p>2018.04.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/as-if-idealization-and-ideals/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Kwame Anthony Appiah, <em>As If: Idealization and Ideals</em>, Harvard University Press, 2017, 218 pp., $27.95, ISBN 9780674975002.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Thomas Kelly, Princeton University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">The topic of the latest stimulating book from Kwame Anthony Appiah is <em>idealization</em>: the kind of thing that we do when we theorize about human beings as though they were perfectly rational expected utility maximizers, or when we offer physical explanations that treat smooth surfaces as though they were frictionless -- all while knowing full well that human being are <em>not</em> perfectly rational expected utility maximizers, and that no actual surface is frictionless. The book grew out of a series of three Carus Lectures that Appiah delivered at the 2013 Eastern Division Meetings of the American Philosophical Association. As one would expect of a book based on public lectures intended for a general philosophical audience, it is... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/as-if-idealization-and-ideals/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/wealth-commerce-and-philosophy-foundational-thinkers-and-business-ethics/ 2018-03-29T19:00:00-0400 2018-03-29T19:00:00-0400 Wealth, Commerce and Philosophy: Foundational Thinkers and Business Ethics Eugene Heath and Byron Kaldis (eds.) <p>2018.03.25 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/wealth-commerce-and-philosophy-foundational-thinkers-and-business-ethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Eugene Heath and Byron Kaldis (eds.), <em>Wealth, Commerce and Philosophy: Foundational Thinkers and Business Ethics</em>, University of Chicago Press, 2017, 437 pp., $45.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780226443850.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jeffrey Moriarty, Bentley University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The purpose of this book is to show how the insights of historically important philosophers (construed broadly) can illuminate issues in business ethics (also construed broadly). It is a welcome addition to the literature: it calls our attention to many ideas and arguments that are underappreciated in, or absent from, current discussions. But it is uneven: some chapters are outstanding, others less so. The book also covers some views better than others. There is more argument in favor of the pursuit of wealth than against it; there is more argument in favor of free markets than against them. For this reason, readers interested in the historical sources of "pro" views about wealth and markets will find this volume especially useful.</p>... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/wealth-commerce-and-philosophy-foundational-thinkers-and-business-ethics/" >Read More</a> </p>