tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2018-01-18T20:00:00-0500 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/aristotles-concept-of-mind/ 2018-01-18T20:00:00-0500 2018-01-18T20:00:00-0500 Aristotle's Concept of Mind Erick Raphael Jiménez <p>2018.01.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aristotles-concept-of-mind/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Erick Raphael Jiménez, <em>Aristotle's Concept of Mind</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 265pp., $99.99, ISBN 9781108151825.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Matthew D. Walker, Yale-NUS College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Erick Raphael Jiménez articulates a systematic account of Aristotle's view of mind (<em>nous</em>). He translates the Greek <em>nous</em> as "mind" on the grounds that other translations, such as "intellect," portray <em>nous</em> as a faculty (p. 12). Jiménez rejects this portrayal:<em> nous</em> is "not simply a naturally given faculty for the perception of a certain sort of perceptible" (p. 16), and "not possessed simply 'by nature'" (p. 44). On the contrary, Jiménez holds -- as his book's first main thesis -- that mind is a "virtue rather than a natural capacity" (p. 7), "a state of intellectual excellence, and not a potentiality like sensation" (p. 33). <em>Nous</em> is attained through actively coming to understand: "Mind and understanding are not potentialities predating... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/aristotles-concept-of-mind/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/ddeleuze-and-ancient-greek-physics-the-image-of-nature/ 2018-01-17T20:35:00-0500 2018-01-17T20:35:00-0500 Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature Michael James Bennett <p>2018.01.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/ddeleuze-and-ancient-greek-physics-the-image-of-nature/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Michael James Bennett, <em>Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature</em>, Bloomsbury, 2017, 288pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474284677.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brent Adkins, Roanoke College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The scholarship that examines Deleuze's use of and relation to Hellenic philosophy is rich and growing. Recent works include Sean Bowden's <em>The Priority of Events</em> and Ryan Johnson's <em>The Deleuze-Lucretius Encounter</em>. Michael James Bennett's book is a new and important contribution to this conversation. Not only does it give new insight into Deleuze's sources and arguments, but, in the spirit of Deleuze's history of philosophy, Bennett also allows us to see what the Stoics and Epicureans (and Deleuze with them) are creating in their thought.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Chief among these creations, according to Bennett, is a new "image of nature." "Image of nature" is deployed here with technical specificity, meant to invoke Deleuze's use of the phrase... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/ddeleuze-and-ancient-greek-physics-the-image-of-nature/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-vindication-of-nothingness/ 2018-01-16T20:00:00-0500 2018-01-16T20:00:00-0500 The Vindication of Nothingness Marco Simionato <p>2018.01.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-vindication-of-nothingness/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Marco Simionato, <em>The Vindication of Nothingness, </em><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Editiones Scholasticae</span>, 2017, 210pp., <span lang="EN-GB" style="background:white">$106.00</span>, ISBN <span style="background:white">9783868385878.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Frederick Kroon, University of Auckland</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Analytic philosophers and classically trained logicians will probably remember chuckling at the passage in <em>Alice Through the Looking Glass </em>about Alice's failure to see the White King's Messenger (asked whether she could see the Messenger, Alice replied: "I see nobody on the road!" To which the King replied: "I only wish I had such eyes. To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance too!"). To many of us, this was the kind of nonsense produced by failing to attend to the logic of language, in this case the fact that words like 'nothing' and 'nobody' are quantifiers rather than noun phrases. The confusion seemed to have philosophical resonances as well. Heidegger was the philosopher who garnered special opprobrium... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-vindication-of-nothingness/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/nature-and-experience-phenomenology-and-the-environment/ 2018-01-15T20:00:00-0500 2018-01-15T20:00:00-0500 Nature and Experience: Phenomenology and the Environment Bryan E. Bannon (ed.) <p>2018.01.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/nature-and-experience-phenomenology-and-the-environment/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Bryan E. Bannon (ed.), <em>Nature and Experience: Phenomenology and the Environment</em>, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016, 242 pp., $127.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781783485208.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Jonathan Maskit, Denison University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Environmental philosophy, like much of philosophy, is methodologically fractured. For many years the dominant strain has been environmental ethics, an approach that seeks to provide the normative grounding for environmental concern. Many environmental ethicists have debated how best to conceive of nature -- holistically, ecosystemically, as species, as individuals, etc. -- as well as what it is about nature conceived in this way that makes it morally considerable. A number of assumptions lie in the background of this approach. First is that there is a meaningful distinction to be drawn between human moral subjects and nature as an object, or set of objects, that may be deserving of moral consideration, even if incapable of reciprocal moral agency. Second is that... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/nature-and-experience-phenomenology-and-the-environment/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/thinking-about-the-emotions-a-philosophical-history/ 2018-01-14T21:00:00-0500 2018-01-14T21:00:00-0500 Thinking about the Emotions: A Philosophical History Alix Cohen and Robert Stern (eds.) <p>2018.01.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/thinking-about-the-emotions-a-philosophical-history/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Alix Cohen and Robert Stern (eds.), <em>Thinking about the Emotions: A Philosophical History</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 321pp., $70.00, ISBN 9780198766858.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Simo Knuuttila, University of Helsinki</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The editors write that "the volume proposes to investigate the philosophical history of the emotions by bringing together leading historians of philosophy and covering a wide spectrum of schools of thought and epochs, from ancient philosophy up to twentieth-century accounts" (1). The work contains one paper on Aristotle, one on Aquinas and Ockham, three on seventeenth-century philosophers (Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Malebranche), four on eighteenth-century philosophers (Shaftesbury and Hutcheson, Kant, Hume, Schiller) and five on post-Kantian philosophy (Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, the Brentano school, Heidegger, Sartre, and analytic philosophy). It is hence mostly a study of the emotions in modern and contemporary Western philosophy.</p> <p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">A more encompassing "philosophical history" would involve chapters on Stoicism, Augustine and Augustinianism,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/thinking-about-the-emotions-a-philosophical-history/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/excessive-subjectivity-kant-hegel-lacan-and-the-foundations-of-ethics/ 2018-01-11T21:00:00-0500 2018-01-11T21:00:00-0500 Excessive Subjectivity: Kant, Hegel, Lacan, and the Foundations of Ethics Dominik Finkelde <p>2018.01.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/excessive-subjectivity-kant-hegel-lacan-and-the-foundations-of-ethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Dominik Finkelde, <em>Excessive Subjectivity -- Kant, Hegel, Lacan, and the Foundations of Ethics</em>, Deva Kemmis and Astrid Weigert (trs.), Columbia University Press, 2017, 340pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780231173186.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Klas Roth, Stockholm University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Dominik Finkelde argues that "there are no 'excessive subjects' but only 'excessive subjectivity'" (76). The latter is, for him, a structural force "that breaks with the context of established ethical life" (5) and cannot be assimilated, either with "the Kantian/formalistic [sense of excessive subjects] nor . . . the Hegelian/pragmatic tradition of ethics" (5). In his opinion it exceeds their work, and is on "a more solid footing" (6) with psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan's work, which in turn is inspired by the work of Kant and Hegel. Finkelde also believes that representatives of excessive subjectivity make change possible, and that an apostle of excessive subjectivity makes <em>desirable</em> change possible.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This is a bold and remarkable book.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/excessive-subjectivity-kant-hegel-lacan-and-the-foundations-of-ethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-problem-of-universals-in-early-modern-philosophy/ 2018-01-11T18:00:00-0500 2018-01-11T18:00:00-0500 The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy Stefano Di Bella and Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.) <p>2018.01.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-problem-of-universals-in-early-modern-philosophy/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Stefano Di Bella and Tad M. Schmaltz<em> </em>(eds.), <em>The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 352pp., $99.00, ISBN 9780190608040.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Benjamin Hill, Western University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">There was a time, not long ago, when no one would have dared publish a book on early modern treatments of the problem of universals. "The early moderns never considered the problem of universals! They were epistemologists, not metaphysicians. They were the ones who rid philosophy of extravagancies and pseudo-problems such as universals. Hume, remember, nicely expressed their hostility toward such abstruse things: 'When we run over libraries, persuaded of these principles, what havoc must we make? If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, <em>Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? </em>No. <em>Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence?</em> No. Commit... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-problem-of-universals-in-early-modern-philosophy/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/nietzsches-constructivism-a-metaphysics-of-material-objects/ 2018-01-10T20:00:00-0500 2018-01-10T20:00:00-0500 Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects Justin Remhof <p>2018.01.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/nietzsches-constructivism-a-metaphysics-of-material-objects/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Justin Remhof, <em>Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects</em>, Routledge, 2018, 175 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138221567.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Matthew Meyer, University of Scranton</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Do ordinary tables and chairs really exist? This will seem like a silly question to many, but a number of contemporary philosophers are taking this question quite seriously. Arguments against the existence of ordinary objects have ranged "from naturalist inclinations to accept only the ontology yielded by our best physical theories to pure a priori arguments based on apparent contradictions in our ordinary concepts."<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[1]</span></span></a> In response to these arguments, philosophers such as Amie Thomasson and Daniel Korman have taken on the task of making reflective sense of "our unreflective common sense worldview"<a href="#_edn2" name="_ednref2" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super">[2]</span></span></a> to assure us that "things are more or less the way they seem" with... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/nietzsches-constructivism-a-metaphysics-of-material-objects/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/irtues-of-freedom-selected-essays-on-kant/ 2018-01-09T21:00:00-0500 2018-01-09T21:00:00-0500 Virtues of Freedom: Selected Essays on Kant Paul Guyer <p>2018.01.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/irtues-of-freedom-selected-essays-on-kant/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Paul Guyer, <em>Virtues of Freedom: Selected Essays on Kant</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 314 pp., $40.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780198755654.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Anne Margaret Baxley, Washington University in St. Louis</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book comprises sixteen essays on Kant's ethics by Paul Guyer. Three are previously unpublished; two of the previously published essays were originally published in German and appear here in English for the first time; a number of the previously published essays have been expanded and revised. The volume is helpfully organized into three parts, concerning, respectively, Kant's views concerning the <em>value</em> of freedom, the <em>actualization</em> of freedom, and the <em>realization</em> of freedom. Although each plays an integral role in Guyer's sustained treatment of the specific notion of freedom at the heart of Kant's ethics, the three divisions could fruitfully be read as independent monographs, each covering a core aspect of Kant's mature account of freedom of choice and its... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/irtues-of-freedom-selected-essays-on-kant/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/changing-the-subject-philosophy-from-socrates-to-adorno/ 2018-01-09T18:00:00-0500 2018-01-09T18:00:00-0500 Changing the Subject: Philosophy from Socrates to Adorno Raymond Geuss <p>2018.01.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/changing-the-subject-philosophy-from-socrates-to-adorno/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Raymond Geuss, <em>Changing the Subject: Philosophy from Socrates to Adorno</em>, Harvard University Press, 2017, 334 pp., $29.95, ISBN 9780674545724.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Frederick Neuhouser, Barnard College, Columbia University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This volume<em> </em>belongs to the genre of works that aim to tell us something about what Western philosophy is -- or, in this case perhaps, about what it was -- by recounting its history from ancient Greece to today (which here means, roughly, two decades after World War II). If this genre is familiar enough, the specific story Raymond Geuss tells is probably not the one you will have encountered in college survey courses or in more standard accounts of the history of philosophy. While the appearance of Geuss's book -- relatively slender compared to other such histories -- is not a reason to throw out the multiple volumes of Copleston on your bookshelf, it is an exceptionally engaging and... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/changing-the-subject-philosophy-from-socrates-to-adorno/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/finding-meaning-in-an-imperfect-world/ 2017-12-21T20:00:00-0500 2017-12-21T20:00:00-0500 Finding Meaning in an Imperfect World Iddo Landau <p>2017.12.25 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/finding-meaning-in-an-imperfect-world/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Iddo Landau, <em>Finding Meaning in an Imperfect World</em>, Oxford University Press, 297pp., $24.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190657666.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Stephen M. Campbell, Bentley University, and Sven Nyholm, Eindhoven University of Technology</strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>THIS IS NDPR'S LAST REVIEW FOR 2017.</strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>WE WILL RESUME PUBLICATION ON JANUARY 9, 2018</strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND A MERRY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR READERS!</strong></p> <p class="image-default">                                                 <img alt="Imgres 2" src="/assets/151881/imgres_2.jpg"></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"> </p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">A noteworthy feature of much ancient philosophy -- especially during the Hellenistic period -- is that it viewed philosophical reasoning as a practical tool with a real potential for helping human beings to lead better lives. For example, Epicurus presented ideas and arguments to help us deal with the fear of death and other threats to happiness,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/finding-meaning-in-an-imperfect-world/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/hegels-political-philosophy-on-the-normative-significance-of-method-and-system/ 2017-12-21T18:00:00-0500 2017-12-21T18:00:00-0500 Hegel's Political Philosophy: On the Normative Significance of Method and System Thom Brooks and Sebastian Stein (eds.) <p>2017.12.24 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hegels-political-philosophy-on-the-normative-significance-of-method-and-system/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Thom Brooks and Sebastian Stein (eds.), <em>Hegel's Political Philosophy: On the Normative Significance of Method and System</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 282pp., $65.00, ISBN 9780198778165.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Timothy L. Brownlee, Xavier University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="background:white">This volume collects thirteen essays that address the question: to what extent does Hegel's political philosophy, especially his <em>Philosophy of Right</em> (<em>PR</em>), depend on the other elements of his philosophical system, and on his dialectical and speculative method? Some of the most significant English-language studies of <em>PR</em> to appear in the past thirty years have worked to challenge the claim that Hegel's practical philosophy depends essentially on his broader philosophical system, in particular on his logic. The contributors include some of the most prominent contemporary scholars writing on Hegel's practical philosophy, and, with some notable exceptions, they tend to defend the importance of method and system for understanding Hegel's political philosophy (though questions about systematic connections loom much larger... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hegels-political-philosophy-on-the-normative-significance-of-method-and-system/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/knowledge-dexterity-and-attention-a-theory-of-epistemic-agency/ 2017-12-20T20:00:00-0500 2017-12-20T20:58:13-0500 Knowledge, Dexterity, and Attention: A Theory of Epistemic Agency Abrol Fairweather and Carlos Montemayor <p>2017.12.23 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-dexterity-and-attention-a-theory-of-epistemic-agency/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Abrol Fairweather and Carlos Montemayor, <em>Knowledge, Dexterity, and Attention: A Theory of Epistemic Agency</em>,<em> </em>Cambridge University Press, 2017, 196 pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107089822.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Mohan Matthen, University of Toronto</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Mika examines a urine sample under a microscope and reports that she has found a high level of red blood cells. Does she <em>know </em>that the patient has microscopic haematuria? Which is more fundamental for deciding this: that Mika is a competent<em> </em>technician who is well-trained and possesses acute eyesight, good technique, and long experience of her specialty and that she acts accordingly, or that her observation of <em>this</em> sample was meticulous? Traditionally, most epistemologists found it natural to choose the latter option. Mika's examination produced knowledge because it was well suited to find out the truth. Her disposition to observe well on <em>other</em> occasions is irrelevant to whether she knows on this occasion -- though, of course, it might... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/knowledge-dexterity-and-attention-a-theory-of-epistemic-agency/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/understanding-scientific-understanding/ 2017-12-20T18:00:00-0500 2017-12-20T18:00:00-0500 Understanding Scientific Understanding Henk W. de Regt <p>2017.12.22 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/understanding-scientific-understanding/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Henk W. de Regt, <em>Understanding Scientific Understanding</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 301pp., $74.00 (hbk), <span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">ISBN: 9780190652913.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Kareem Khalifa, Middlebury College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The sciences seek to enhance our understanding of empirical phenomena. But what does this understanding involve? Arguably, Henk de Regt is the foremost philosopher of science to have underscored this question's importance. So, this book -- which creatively synthesizes two decades of his work into an elegant and provocative account of scientific understanding -- is a much anticipated and welcome addition to the literature.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">De Regt's book makes two central claims. First, the aims of science require intelligible theories (Chapter 2). De Regt argues as follows: (P1) providing correct explanations is an epistemic aim of science; (P2) correct explanations require scientists to use intelligible theories; so, (C) the epistemic aims of science require intelligible theories.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/understanding-scientific-understanding/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/truth-in-husserl-heidegger-and-the-frankfurt-school-critical-retrieval/ 2017-12-19T22:00:00-0500 2017-12-19T22:00:00-0500 Truth in Husserl, Heidegger, and the Frankfurt School: Critical Retrieval Lambert Zuidervaart <p>2017.12.21 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/truth-in-husserl-heidegger-and-the-frankfurt-school-critical-retrieval/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Lambert Zuidervaart, <em>Truth in Husserl, Heidegger, and the Frankfurt School: Critical Retrieval</em>, MIT Press, 2017, 256 pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262036283.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Patrick Murray, Creighton University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Lambert Zuidervaart delivers a clear, compact, and analytically ordered book with an engaging narrative spine. What can some key twentieth-century German philosophers teach us about how best to conceive of truth? It is a rewarding read. Much of the material has appeared previously, but it benefits from the book’s aiming for a comprehensive conception of truth. Zuidervaart’s previous books set the context, as do two more in progress, a companion volume on analytic theories of truth and a culminating work: " “Articulating the details of such a comprehensive conception of truth is the ultimate aim of my decades-long research project” (ix). Going against the current, Zuidervaart has passionately explored nonpropositional truth since his graduate studies. It is no wonder that... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/truth-in-husserl-heidegger-and-the-frankfurt-school-critical-retrieval/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/how-much-regulation-do-we-need/ 2017-12-19T20:00:00-0500 2017-12-19T22:27:51-0500 Debating Gun Control: How Much Regulation Do We Need? David DeGrazia and Lester Hunt <p>2017.12.20 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-much-regulation-do-we-need/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">David DeGrazia and Lester Hunt, </strong><strong><em>Debating Gun Control:</em></strong><strong> </strong><strong style="font-weight:bold"><em>How Much Regulation Do We Need?</em> Oxford University Press, 2016, 290pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190251260.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Firmin DeBrabander, Maryland Institute College of Art</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Few topics in US politics are as divisive as the debate over gun rights. We are living at a high tide in the gun rights movement; never has it been so politically dominant. Twenty years ago, the chief gun lobby, the National Rifle Association (NRA), agreed to modest gun control measures, such as universal background checks.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><strong><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><strong>[1]</strong></span></strong></span></a> No longer. Now the NRA pushes for Permitless Carry, legal in 11 states, whereby gun owners can carry their guns in public without a permit -- and no safety training.<a href="#_edn2" name="_ednref2" title=""><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><strong><span class="MsoEndnoteReference" style="vertical-align:super"><strong>[2]</strong></span></strong></span></a> Since 2006, gun rights advocates have prodded 11 states to legalize Campus Carry, which allows people to carry guns on... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/how-much-regulation-do-we-need/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/representation-and-scepticism-from-aquinas-to-descartes/ 2017-12-19T18:00:00-0500 2017-12-19T18:00:00-0500 Representation and Scepticism from Aquinas to Descartes Han Thomas Adriaenssen <p>2017.12.19 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/representation-and-scepticism-from-aquinas-to-descartes/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Han Thomas Adriaenssen, <em>Representation and Scepticism from Aquinas to Descartes</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 279pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107181625.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Dominik Perler, Humbolt-Universität zu Berlin</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">It has often been argued that many early modern philosophers were deeply concerned about the "veil of ideas" problem. How can we ever have cognitive access to things in the material world if the only objects we immediately apprehend are ideas in our mind? Aren't material things hidden behind this veil of ideas? Medieval philosophers seem to have discussed a similar problem, which might be called the "veil of species" problem. How can we ever cognize material things if the only objects we immediately apprehend are intelligible species in our intellect? Can we ever go beyond species and grasp the material things themselves? At first sight, it looks as if early modern authors simply rephrased the medieval problem. It is... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/representation-and-scepticism-from-aquinas-to-descartes/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/rights-forfeiture-and-punishment/ 2017-12-18T22:00:00-0500 2017-12-18T22:00:00-0500 Rights Forfeiture and Punishment Christopher Heath Wellman <p>2017.12.18 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/rights-forfeiture-and-punishment/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong>Christopher Heath Wellman, <em>Rights Forfeiture and Punishment</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 228pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190274764.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David Dolinko, University of California, Los Angeles</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Convicted criminals are punished by "hard treatment" -- restrictions and deprivations that would ordinarily be viewed as flagrant moral wrongs, such as loss of property, of liberty, and even of life. Scholars have fought for centuries over what makes such punishment morally permissible, if indeed it is. Christopher Heath Wellman addresses this perennial problem of the "justification of punishment" and contends that the vast majority of proposed answers have been fundamentally misconceived.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Those answers traditionally take punishment to be morally legitimated by the crucial importance of the purposes it serves, such as deterrence, retribution, rehabilitation, and reprobation. Wellman, however, asserts that neither these nor any other purposes can make punishment morally acceptable. Describing the intended... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/rights-forfeiture-and-punishment/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-philosophy-of-trust/ 2017-12-18T18:00:00-0500 2017-12-18T18:00:00-0500 The Philosophy of Trust Paul Faulkner and Thomas Simpson (eds.) <p>2017.12.17 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosophy-of-trust/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Paul Faulkner and Thomas Simpson (eds.), <em>The Philosophy of Trust</em>, Oxford University Press, 2016, 336pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198732549.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Sanford C. Goldberg, Northwestern University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Paul Faulkner and Thomas Simpson are to be congratulated on an excellent volume on the timely (and increasingly discussed) topic of trust. The book covers the gamut, from the social and political aspects of trust, to the ethics of trust, to the epistemology of trust. It brings together some of the leading figures on the topic, as well as some who are not as well known. I would recommend it highly for anyone with even a passing interest in the nature of trust.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">In their helpful introduction, Faulkner and Simpson identify three main themes that emerge in the volume: trust and cooperation, trust and knowledge, and trust and social philosophy. But this level of abstraction... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-philosophy-of-trust/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/leibniz-on-causation-and-agency/ 2017-12-17T22:00:00-0500 2017-12-17T22:00:00-0500 Leibniz on Causation and Agency Julia Jorati <p>2017.12.16 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/leibniz-on-causation-and-agency/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Julia Jorati, <em>Leibniz on Causation and Agency</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 224pp., $99.99, ISBN 9781107192676.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Marc Bobro, Santa Barbara City College</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Works in the history of philosophy, including book-length interpretations of Leibniz's thought, typically adopt one of two approaches. At one extreme is the "fossil bed" approach whose sole aim is to determine what a dead philosopher thought. There is no real attempt to judge its philosophical merits nor, especially, to relate its ideas to current developments. This is <em>historical</em> history of philosophy. Daniel Garber's books come to mind. At the other extreme, there is <em>philosophical</em> history of philosophy. Such works are not especially concerned with getting a philosopher right, but to determine whether that philosopher was right. Jonathan Bennett's books represent this tendency. Julia Jorati's book seems a perfect blend of these two approaches: history with philosophy. To my mind,... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/leibniz-on-causation-and-agency/" >Read More</a> </p>