tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/feedburner-feed/ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News 2018-12-11T19:00:00-0500 tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-elements-and-patterns-of-being-essays-in-metaphysics/ 2018-12-11T19:00:00-0500 2018-12-11T19:00:00-0500 The Elements and Patterns of Being: Essays in Metaphysics D. C. Williams <p>2018.12.11 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-elements-and-patterns-of-being-essays-in-metaphysics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">D. C. Williams, <em>The Elements and Patterns of Being: Essays in Metaphysics</em>, A. R. J. Fischer (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2018, 239pp., $67.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198810384.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Anna-Sofia Maurin, University of Gothenburg</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Donald Cary Williams studied at Harvard, where he received his PhD in 1924. After a stint at UCLA (1930-1939), he went on to spend the majority of his pre-retirement work-life at his alma mater (1939-1967). In spite of the fact that most of his active career took place in an environment characterized by thoroughly anti-metaphysical, anti-realist sentiments, Williams persisted in promoting the sorts of theories popular before the age of ordinary language philosophy and logical positivism. He was a stern realist and a naturalist, convinced that we can know things about the (mind-independent) fundamental constituents of (spatiotemporal) reality. His preferred method was 'scientistic' in that he thought that the way we know these things is through induction coupled with inference... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-elements-and-patterns-of-being-essays-in-metaphysics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/concern-respect-and-cooperation/ 2018-12-10T21:00:00-0500 2018-12-10T21:00:00-0500 Concern, Respect, and Cooperation Garrett Cullity <p>2018.12.10 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/concern-respect-and-cooperation/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong>Garrett Cullity, <em>Concern, Respect, and Cooperation</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 311pp., </strong><strong>$67.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198807841.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Thomas Hurka, University of Toronto</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This book gives a comprehensive account of morality, both its deontic part, about what we ought or have reason to do, and its evaluative part, about what's desirable or good, and it does so in the general style of W.D. Ross. Garrett Cullity doesn't give verdicts on particular acts or outcomes, nor state principles that can yield them directly. Instead he identifies a number of moral factors that, like Ross's prima facie duties, can contribute to such verdicts, and he describes the mechanisms by which they do so. His too, then, is a version of moral pluralism. But he departs from Ross in two directions. He gives further foundations for some of Ross's basic factors, which makes for more underlying... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/concern-respect-and-cooperation/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/efficient-cognition-the-evolution-of-representational-decision-making/ 2018-12-10T19:00:00-0500 2018-12-10T19:00:00-0500 Efficient Cognition: The Evolution of Representational Decision Making Armin W. Schulz <p>2018.12.09 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/efficient-cognition-the-evolution-of-representational-decision-making/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Armin W. Schulz, <em>Efficient Cognition: The Evolution of Representational Decision Making</em>, MIT Press, 2018, 267pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262037600.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Zoe Drayson, University of California, Davis</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Much human behavior is stimulus-free. While plants and many non-human animals respond reflexively to their present environment, our own actions are mediated by our ability to represent how the world has been and how it could be, and how we might alter it to achieve our goals. Philosophers who have explored the evolutionary pressures giving rise to representational cognition, such as Godfrey-Smith (1996) and Sterelny (2003), have emphasized the role played by environmental complexity. Armin Schulz suggests that an important part of this evolutionary story has been overlooked. He argues that representationally mediated behavior is adaptive because it is more cognitively efficient than reflex-driven behavior, under certain conditions.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">When Schulz argues for the efficiency of... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/efficient-cognition-the-evolution-of-representational-decision-making/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/defending-biodiversity-environmental-science-and-ethics/ 2018-12-09T22:00:00-0500 2018-12-09T22:46:48-0500 Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics Jonathan A. Newman, Gary Varner, and Stefan Linquist <p>2018.12.08 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/defending-biodiversity-environmental-science-and-ethics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">Jonathan A. Newman, Gary Varner, and Stefan Linquist, <em>Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 441pp., $47.99 (pbk), ISBN </span><span style="background:white">9780521146203</span><span lang="EN-AU" style="background:white">.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Alkistis Elliott-Graves, University of Helsinki</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">"Imagine that you are an environmentalist who passionately believes that it is wrong to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. How do you convince someone that a decision to drill is wrong?" This quote from the blurb accurately sums up the motivation, content and approach of Newman, Varner and Linquist's book. The authors, self-proclaimed environmentalists, go over the existing defences of biodiversity conservation with a critical fine-toothed comb, searching for the ones that can best withstand the critics' scrutiny. The book is an exemplar of accessible philosophical writing that can be applied to real-world problems by academics and non-academics alike.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">If this book had been written twenty or thirty years earlier, it... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/defending-biodiversity-environmental-science-and-ethics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/proto-phenomenology-and-the-nature-of-language-dwelling-in-speech-i/ 2018-12-05T21:00:00-0500 2018-12-05T21:13:28-0500 Proto-Phenomenology and the Nature of Language: Dwelling in Speech I Lawrence J. Hatab <p>2018.12.07 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/proto-phenomenology-and-the-nature-of-language-dwelling-in-speech-i/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Lawrence J. Hatab, <em>Proto-Phenomenology and the Nature of Language: Dwelling in Speech I,</em> Rowman and Littlefield, 2017, 260pp., $42.00 (pbk), ISBN 9781783488193.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Carolyn Culbertson, Florida Gulf Coast University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Lawrence J. Hatab's book is a welcome addition to current philosophical conversations about phenomenology and language alike. In the first half of the book, phenomenology, is the focal point. In the sections entitled "Proto-Phenomenology and the Lived World" and "Disclosure, Interpretation, and Philosophy," Hatab takes his readers through what it means that phenomenology grants priority to the lived world and argues persuasively on behalf of this as a philosophical approach. He argues that philosophy goes astray when it tries to get behind the understanding that we have by virtue of our immersion in the lived, social world, as, for instance, reductive forms of naturalism attempt to do. The topic of language emerges as the focal point only in the second... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/proto-phenomenology-and-the-nature-of-language-dwelling-in-speech-i/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/visual-experience-a-semantic-approach/ 2018-12-05T19:00:00-0500 2018-12-05T19:00:00-0500 Visual Experience: A Semantic Approach Wylie Breckenridge <p>2018.12.06 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/visual-experience-a-semantic-approach/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Wylie Breckenridge, <em>Visual Experience: A Semantic Approach, </em>Oxford University Press, 2018, 165pp., $54.00 (hbk), I</strong><strong>SBN 9780199600465.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Christopher Gauker, Universität Salzburg</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The purpose of this short book is to provide a semantic analysis of sentences of the form "X looks F to S". Breckenridge says that his purpose is to explain what it means for a visual experience to have a certain character (p. 7), but the focus is really on a semantic analysis. The example that Breckenridge works with throughout is the sentence,</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">(1) The patch looks grey to you.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The analysis that Breckenridge arrives at is, to a first approximation, this:</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:40px; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">(2) You have a visual experience of the patch that is occurring in way f(greyness, looking).</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">(Here I... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/visual-experience-a-semantic-approach/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/evil-in-aristotle/ 2018-12-04T21:00:00-0500 2018-12-04T21:00:00-0500 Evil in Aristotle Pavlos Kontos (ed.) <p>2018.12.05 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/evil-in-aristotle/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Pavlos Kontos (ed.), <em>Evil in Aristotle</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 277pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107161979.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Sophia M. Connell, Birkbeck, University of London</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In Aristotle's philosophy, there is no source or principle of evil as there is of good (<em>Metaphysics</em> IX.9, 1051a19-21). Badness does not exist in the category of substance, whereas the supreme god is existence <em>par excellence</em>. Furthermore, there is no contrary to this 'primary being' (<em>Metaphysics</em> XII.10, 1075b20-24). How then, does evil get a foothold? Extreme badness is for Aristotle not something substantial or a source or principle in its own right but rather the absence or privation of good.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">This collection constitutes the first focused treatment of Aristotle on evil. In the past, most have assumed that since he has neither an evil intelligence, like Satan, nor a source of everything bad, such as... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/evil-in-aristotle/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/epistemic-consequentialism/ 2018-12-04T19:00:00-0500 2018-12-04T19:00:00-0500 Epistemic Consequentialism Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij and Jeffrey Dunn (eds.) <p>2018.12.04 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/epistemic-consequentialism/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij and Jeffrey Dunn (eds.),<em> </em><em>Epistemic Consequentialism</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 335pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198779681.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Brian Talbot, University of Colorado, Boulder</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">The book is an anthology of previously unpublished papers about whether epistemic norms can be explained in terms of epistemic value, and if so, which epistemic norms, which epistemic values, and how the explanation would work. Overall, I found the book engaging and fruitful. It shows that now is an exciting time to be an epistemologist. The papers contribute to a number of important debates and point towards further needed debates.</span></strong></p> <p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-weight:normal">Who is the book for? A significant chunk is or engages with "formal" epistemology, and eight chapters out of thirteen have some formalisms in them. But almost all will be of interest to both "traditional" and formal epistemologists, and... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/epistemic-consequentialism/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/early-modern-women-on-metaphysics/ 2018-12-03T21:00:00-0500 2018-12-03T21:00:00-0500 Early Modern Women on Metaphysics Emily Thomas (ed.) <p>2018.12.03 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/early-modern-women-on-metaphysics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p><strong style="font-weight:bold">Emily Thomas (ed.), <em>Early Modern Women on Metaphysics, </em>Cambridge University Press, 2018, 295pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN <span style="background:white">9781107178687.</span></strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Julia Borcherding, New York University, University of Cambridge</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">In recent decades, scholars of early modern philosophy have increasingly striven to write a more inclusive history of the period, and, as part of that effort, to recover the writings of early modern women philosophers. In showing these writings to be both original and insightful, their scholarship underscores not only the historical importance of early modern women’s writings. It also — given the crucial role of the early modern period in shaping our present philosophical concerns — highlights their importance to our understanding of philosophy as we now practice it. In engaging with the work of early modern women philosophers, we may thus hope not only to arrive at a fuller history of our discipline, but also at a richer... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/early-modern-women-on-metaphysics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/moral-philosophy-in-eighteenth-century-britain-god-self-and-other/ 2018-12-03T19:00:00-0500 2018-12-03T19:00:00-0500 Moral Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain: God, Self, and Other Colin Heydt <p>2018.12.02 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moral-philosophy-in-eighteenth-century-britain-god-self-and-other/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Colin Heydt, <em>Moral Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain: God, Self, and Other</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 289pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108421096.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David McNaughton, Florida State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Anyone familiar with eighteenth century British moral philosophy will have come across a tri-partite division of duties into those we owe to God, to others, and to ourselves. The widespread and unremarked acceptance of this division reflects, Colin Heydt claims, the entrenchment of a theory of rights and duties, a Protestant natural law theory if you will, that is found in the writings of Pufendorf and, to a lesser degree, Grotius. Not only would this theory be familiar to all writers in Britain (and, significantly, the American colonies) but Heydt further claims it became 'the default position by being propagated in the university, especially through the curriculum, and through textbooks' (p. 5). This historical claim is backed up with an... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/moral-philosophy-in-eighteenth-century-britain-god-self-and-other/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/narrow-content/ 2018-12-02T19:00:00-0500 2018-12-02T19:00:00-0500 Narrow Content Juhani Yli-Vakkuri and John Hawthorne <p>2018.12.01 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/narrow-content/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Juhani Yli-Vakkuri and John Hawthorne, <em>Narrow Content, </em>Oxford University Press, 2018, 213pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198785965.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by David J. Chalmers, New York University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This important book on narrow content is presented as a third act in what might be called the Twin Earth Wars. At the start of the first act (a long time ago, around 1970) the internalist empire slumbers in dogmatic confidence that the meanings of our words and the contents of our thoughts depend only on what is in the head. In the first act the externalist rebels Hilary Putnam and Tyler Burge deploy Twin Earth thought experiments to argue that meaning and content often depend on matters outside the head. The rebels succeed so well that at this point the externalists become the empire. In the second act, internalist rebels strike back: David Lewis, Frank Jackson, and others argue... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/narrow-content/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-many-futures-of-a-decision/ 2018-11-29T21:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T21:00:00-0500 The Many Futures of a Decision Jay Lampert <p>2018.11.29 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-many-futures-of-a-decision/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jay Lampert, <em>The Many Futures of a Decision</em>, Bloomsbury, 2018, 332pp., $94.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350047785.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by James Williams, Deakin University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">I couldn't help flinching when the email arrived asking for a review of Jay Lampert's excellent new book. Its title is perhaps a little too topical, in Scotland, in 2018. We are certainly wrestling with the many futures of a decision. So long as you are not among the lab rats, the Brexit referendum result is the perfect experiment for reflecting on the salient questions. Who decided? Which futures? How did they decide? Was it irreversible?</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">The central question of Lampert's investigation is more theoretical. The point is not to analyse the idea of a decision or an intention, but rather to see what the phenomenology of decisions tell us about the future. The object... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-many-futures-of-a-decision/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/being-freedom-and-method-themes-from-the-philosophy-of-peter-van-inwagen/ 2018-11-29T19:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T19:00:00-0500 Being, Freedom, and Method: Themes from the Philosophy of Peter van Inwagen John A. Keller (ed.) <p>2018.11.28 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/being-freedom-and-method-themes-from-the-philosophy-of-peter-van-inwagen/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John A. Keller (ed.), <em>Being, Freedom, and Method: Themes from the Philosophy of Peter van Inwagen</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 402pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198715702.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by John Schwenkler, Florida State University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span lang="EN-AU" style="font-weight:normal">Among philosophers today, Peter van Inwagen's reputation for failure to understand things stands out in much the same way, if not quite to the same degree, as Socrates' self-proclaimed ignorance was known among the Athenians. In each case the deficit in question is arguably overstated. Socrates was certainly wiser than his fellow citizens, and not only in the knowledge of his limits. Likewise, van Inwagen might in fact understand more things than he believes he does -- and it is a near certainty that he understands many more things than the average philosopher.</span></strong></p> <p class="NDPR3Reviewer" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold"><span style="font-weight:normal">An important difference, however, is that whereas Socrates expressed his ignorance in the confidence that, at least... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/being-freedom-and-method-themes-from-the-philosophy-of-peter-van-inwagen/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/hegels-metaphysics-and-the-philosophy-of-politics/ 2018-11-28T19:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 Hegel's Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Politics Michael J. Thompson (ed.) <p>2018.11.27 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hegels-metaphysics-and-the-philosophy-of-politics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Michael J. Thompson<em> </em>(ed.),<em> Hegel's Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Politics</em>, Routledge, 2018, 333pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138288515.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by  Dean Moyar, Johns Hopkins University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">One of the tasks of those working on the history of political philosophy is to connect the writings of the past to the problems and theories of the present. This is naturally thought of as step two in a process, the first step of which is to understand the original text on its own terms. Only once we have the interpretation right will we be in a position to say how the claims in the historical text -- specified in step one -- relate to today's issues. Seems pretty simple. But in the case of Hegel several factors complicate this process. Hegel's main work of political philosophy, known by its abbreviated title as the <em>Philosophy of Right</em>, is explicitly based... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/hegels-metaphysics-and-the-philosophy-of-politics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-buddhist-roots-of-zhu-xis-philosophical-thought/ 2018-11-27T21:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 The Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi's Philosophical Thought John Makeham (ed.) <p>2018.11.26 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-buddhist-roots-of-zhu-xis-philosophical-thought/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><span style="page:WordSection1"><strong style="font-weight:bold">John Makeham (ed.), <em>The Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi's Philosophical Thought</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 354pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190878559.</strong></span></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Philip J. Ivanhoe, Sungkyunkwan University</strong></p> <div class="WordSection1"> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in"><span style="page:WordSection1">This volume aims at answering important questions about the historical sources of Zhu Xi's philosophical system; it includes a wealth of information about earlier, Buddhist philosophical writings and makes clear how some of these appear to have informed and influenced the development of Zhu's philosophical system. I will very briefly describe the contents of the volume, highlighting some of the ways in which the various chapters fill out our understanding of how Chinese Buddhist philosophy provided sources and context for the development of Zhu's thought. I then will consider what the volume aims to and does achieve.</span></p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><span style="page:WordSection1">The volume begins with an Introduction that is a substantial scholarly contribution in itself.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-buddhist-roots-of-zhu-xis-philosophical-thought/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/neuroexistentialism-meaning-morals-and-purpose-in-the-age-of-neuroscience/ 2018-11-27T19:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience Gregg D. Caruso and Owen Flanagan (eds.) <p>2018.11.25 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/neuroexistentialism-meaning-morals-and-purpose-in-the-age-of-neuroscience/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Gregg D. Caruso and Owen Flanagan (eds.), <em>Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 368pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190460730.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Markus Gabriel, University of Bonn</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">The present volume is very ambitious in its thematic scope and covers four dimensions of the implications of neuroscience, or rather, of philosophical interpretations of the role that neuroscience might play for our self-understanding as agents and thinkers. It is based on a sweeping historical claim according to which we live in "the age of neuroscience", which is supposed to lead to a crisis in the human self-conception worthy of a third wave of existentialism.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">As a matter of fact, the papers collected  are clearly not all written in order to substantiate the claims of the editors and so make a rather disparate impression. For this reason, I will focus only on some of the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/neuroexistentialism-meaning-morals-and-purpose-in-the-age-of-neuroscience/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/absolute-time-rifts-in-early-modern-british-metaphysics/ 2018-11-26T21:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics Emily Thomas <p>2018.11.24 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/absolute-time-rifts-in-early-modern-british-metaphysics/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Emily Thomas, <em>Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics</em>, Oxford University Press, 2018, 236pp., $61.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198807933.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Douglas Jesseph, University of South Florida</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Philosophers have long been concerned with the nature of time, and quite a number of seventeenth-century British thinkers theorized on the subject in some detail. Emily Thomas proposes to guide the reader through "the development of absolute time during one of Britain's richest and most creative metaphysical periods, from the 1640s to the 1730s" (p. 1). The result is a book that contains some significant insights into the philosophy of time in Early Modern Britain, but is ultimately unsatisfying. Part of the problem lies with the scope of authors and doctrines considered. Newton's <em>Principia</em> is scarcely considered (although his enigmatic unpublished essay "De Gravitatione et Equiponderatione Fluidorum" merits a chapter). Further, the views of Thomas Hobbes and George Berkeley are... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/absolute-time-rifts-in-early-modern-british-metaphysics/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/kant-and-the-faculty-of-feeling/ 2018-11-26T19:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 Kant and the Faculty of Feeling Kelly Sorensen and Diane Williamson (eds.) <p>2018.11.23 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kant-and-the-faculty-of-feeling/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong>Kelly Sorensen and Diane Williamson (eds.), <em>Kant and the Faculty of Feeling</em>, Cambridge University Press, 2018, 276pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107178229.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Tim Jankowiak, Towson University</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">This excellent volume marks an important contribution to the growing body of literature on Kant's heretofore underappreciated account of the "faculty of feeling." The essays address a wide range of topics related to Kant's systematic account of the structure of mind, the relevance of feeling to moral cognition, aesthetic experience, and the points of contact between theoretical and practical philosophy. The book will be rewarding for anyone concerned with any of these issues. Before jumping into my remarks about the individual contributions to the volume, I'll do a little stage-setting.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">Kant divides the mind into three main faculties: cognition, desire, and feeling. Each of these faculties is characterized first and foremost in terms of the... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/kant-and-the-faculty-of-feeling/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/attention-not-self/ 2018-11-20T21:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 Attention, Not Self Jonardon Ganeri <p>2018.11.22 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/attention-not-self/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Jonardon Ganeri, <em>Attention, Not Self</em>, Oxford University Press, 2017, 392pp., $40.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780198757405.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Sebastian Watzl, University of Oslo</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">Why should we study the philosophical ideas of someone who lived many centuries ago, in a far-away part of the world, and in a highly different cultural context? One reason is to expand one's philosophical horizon: to move beyond the narrow confinements of one's own little neighborhood of the vast philosophical city (Priest 2011), and thus to approach the contemporary philosophical scene with newly gained humility on account of its limitations.</p> <p class="NDPRBodyTexT" style="margin-bottom:0.0001pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt">One educated in contemporary cognitive science and philosophy may have expected in Jonardon Ganeri's book a confrontation with such a marvelously strange new neighborhood. It is, after all, a book largely on the philosophical ideas of the 6<sup>th</sup> century Indian philosopher Buddhaghosa, writing in... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/attention-not-self/" >Read More</a> </p> tag:ndpr.nd.edu,2005:/news/the-imagination-in-humes-philosophy-the-canvas-of-the-mind/ 2018-11-20T19:00:00-0500 2018-11-29T13:13:52-0500 The Imagination in Hume's Philosophy: The Canvas of the Mind Timothy M. Costelloe <p>2018.11.21 : <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-imagination-in-humes-philosophy-the-canvas-of-the-mind/" >View this Review Online</a> | <a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu//news" >View Recent NDPR Reviews</a></p> <p><strong><p class="NDPR2Bibliographic" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:12pt"><strong style="font-weight:bold">Timothy M. Costelloe, <em>The Imagination in Hume's Philosophy: </em><em>The Canvas of the Mind</em>, Edinburgh University Press, 2018, 312pp., $125.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474436397.</strong></p></strong></p> <p><strong>Reviewed by Christopher Williams, University of Nevada, Reno</strong></p> <p class="NDPR1JournalTitle" style="margin-bottom:10pt; margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-top:0in">If we ask what the imagination is for Hume, there are two ways of taking the question. We could be asking about the <em>objects</em> of a mental faculty, and the answer would be "ideas" (entertainable thoughts, which contrast with the impressions of sense as well as the recollections of memory). Or we could be asking about the <em>actions</em> that the faculty performs, and here the answer, assuming a different shape, would be "the association of ideas," with easy transitions between, and completions of unions among, the objects of the faculty. Both ways of addressing the question are needed for understanding Hume, who calls upon the imagination to do a lot of work, and work of different kinds, in his philosophy.... <br /> <p><a href="https://ndpr.nd.edu/news/the-imagination-in-humes-philosophy-the-canvas-of-the-mind/" >Read More</a> </p>